Surprise! You brought the kids to D&D night!

26 posts / 0 new
Last post
First let me state this not a thread to rip on kids or parents.  I love kids I just haven't been blessed with any.  What I am seeking is advice/ tactics/ strategy for when a player or DM brings kids to a scheduled game night at the last second.

Okay so it's D&D night.   Suddenly a few small children appear beside the game table.  Maybe someone's scheduling was changed and no baby sitter could be found.  Perhaps the parents can't afford a baby sitter and since everyone is friends just brought the little people along (the economy is tough after all).  What about when you play at the home where they have small children?  What if the DM has children and it's either he brings them or you don't play?  Kids are curious and excited to interact with adults but can also be a distraction.  The nights game changes from one of exploring ancient ruins to switching shows on Netflix and potty break interruptions.  I don't blame the kids.  They like to be included, they want snacks, they don't understand.  In time they may take their places at the gaming table as the next generation of players and DM's.  But right now these children want to sit on laps, use the tablet you brought to "show you" a cool game, ask why you never have juice when they visit or tell you stories about 2nd grade.

I'm looking for advice on keeping kids entertained so you and your friends can play D&D.

Side note:  My inspiration for this thread occurred after our DM brought a 5 year old Rogue to game night who discovered my candy dish full of Hershey Kisses.  The Rogue not only covertly ate all the Kisses but then hid the evidence by secreting the foil wrappers throughout my house.  I had to laugh as I discovered tin foil wrappers hidden under the sofa, behind a plant, and between books on a shelf.  I guess candy is monitored closely at the Rogue's house so she went for broke when she discovered my "treasure trove".
perhaps suggest that parents bring entertainment for their kids? Finding stuff on Netflix can be time consuming but if they have 3-4 DVD's they should be set. Most parents I know do this already (and I am neither a parent or a D&D player). Unfortunately, I think it's just part of being a non parent with friends who are parents: just part of life I guess...

EDH decks I play:

 

Prossh: http://community.wizards.com/forum/commander-edh/threads/4101381

 

Derevi: http://community.wizards.com/forum/commander-edh/threads/4115936

 

Kaalia (the beats)

 

Zur (disgusting combo)

 

Damia (Bug Elf deck)

 

Numot (Stax)

 

Griselbrand (French)

 

Ghave (Uber combo)

 

Muzzio (Oops, Blightsteel)

I, in fact, play/run with a group at a house where there is a 1-year-old child.  Most of the time, she is upstairs with her mom, watching TV, eating, napping, etc.  But every so often Mommy needs a break and brings the child downstairs and hands her to her Daddy.

As she is a year old and not really communicative yet, she sits in Daddy's lap, she walks around the basement, we have huge dice that we give her to play with, and we keep playing, no harm no foul. 

Sometimes the game gets sidetracked because the child is doing something that most of the table finds cute or interesting or "scary."  So, you stop playing for a while, again no harm no foul.

Another player has a strict schedule, we play from 12 noon to 5:30pm.  At 5:30 he has to leave because he has a wife and baby daughter waiting for him.  We are unable to modify the game time because it is the time that he and his wife have agreed upon for gaming.  So basically, we watch the clock and when 5pm rolls around we wrap up the session.

In short, my advice to you is to simply be adaptive and flexible - do not worry about keeping the kids entertained, that's their parents' task, but do not be overly concerned when a game session ends up being mostly about keeping the kids happy.  S*** happens, you deal with it, life goes on .

 

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/19.jpg)

Are you really "entitled to your opinion"?
RedSiegfried wrote:
The cool thing is, you don't even NEED a reason to say yes.  Just stop looking for a reason to say no.
I'm looking for advice on keeping kids entertained so you and your friends can play D&D.

TV

(preferably one connected to a Lego Star Wars video game)

A Netflix account, a pizza, and a Wii loaded with Super Smash Bros. Brawl will keep most kids (and adults) entertained for a quite a while.  Or, at least, it works on me.  At-Will MLP and Adventure Time?  You guys have fun being elves, I'm good here.
Thinking about creating a race for 4e? Make things a lil' easier on yourself by reading my Race Mechanic Creation Guide first.
Hey, some slightly different questions for you guys, still involving kids.

How would you deal with kids at the gaming table when they are there to play? For example how do you keep them engaged and interested in the encounter when they're not swinging their sword at stuff? During other players turns and outside of combat.

Last week I started running encounters sessions for my local game store and I have only DM'd 2-3 times before, heck i'd showed up to play but we needed another DM and i was handed the encounters packet and some maps. The group consisted of a man about 40yrs old with his 10yr old son, my 17yr old friend, and another pair of kids age 8 and 10 with their mom silently reading a book as they played.

So between reading the encounters for the first time as I ran them and trying to keep the pace quick so my younger players didn't get too bored it went pretty horribly. I could tell the disinterest in the younger players especially and although i'd rather not have a group of very young players at my table i'm not really able to refuse to let them play.
Hey, some slightly different questions for you guys, still involving kids.

How would you deal with kids at the gaming table when they are there to play? For example how do you keep them engaged and interested in the encounter when they're not swinging their sword at stuff? During other players turns and outside of combat.

Last week I started running encounters sessions for my local game store and I have only DM'd 2-3 times before, heck i'd showed up to play but we needed another DM and i was handed the encounters packet and some maps. The group consisted of a man about 40yrs old with his 10yr old son, my 17yr old friend, and another pair of kids age 8 and 10 with their mom silently reading a book as they played.

So between reading the encounters for the first time as I ran them and trying to keep the pace quick so my younger players didn't get too bored it went pretty horribly. I could tell the disinterest in the younger players especially and although i'd rather not have a group of very young players at my table i'm not really able to refuse to let them play.

I've had to game with kids on more than one occassion. My usual approach is to keep things pretty non-rigorous with them. I don't bother trying to teach them the rules, or the setting or anything, and I try to make anything they want to try work. This gets them excited and involved. If its been a while since they've been asked for input, I'll ask them what something in the game looks or sounds like. I make an effort to be enthusiastic about their ideas and suggestions. Works for older players, too.

What was the problem with keeping the pace quick? Just your inexperience with the module? Was there a lot of rules discussion on the other players' turns?

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

One word: Bribery.
"Here is one candy each. If you sit quietly until spongebob is finished, you get another candy."
Rinse. repeat.
Its not a way to raise kids, but its a way to keep them quiet. And it teaches them valuable lessons about cause and affect and the value of work.
 
Here's an idea:

How about asking the kids for help with the adventure?  It could be as simple as having the kids watch you and have them take turns in rolling dice, or if they're the talkative sort they could help tell the story or even provide dream sequences where some crazy stuff can happen during their turn.

Consider the fact that TRPGs are supposed to be a storytelling medium, where mechanics interact with each other to create crazy fun stories.  Combine that with kids who have a crazy amount of imagination that makes up for their complete lack of experience and knowledge about the game rules (or much about everything in life, as a whole).

If your kid is particularly keen on inventing stories, perhaps you could teach them a simplified version of the TRPG you're using, or even introducing everyone to a low-complexity TRPG that even a 5-year old who watches Dora the Explorer can run

Show

I was suddenly reminded of a little thing posted in Google+ related to this somewhat; a guy picked up a Kindergarten math sheet with the challenge of crafting game rules based on the given "character sheet".  I wrote the last set of rules posted in the link, copy-pasted for the benefit of all:

All About The Number
Pick a number from 1 to 10.


  • during your turn, any physical actions that don't involve another creature will require you to roll below this number, while mental actions (including the casting of spells) that don't involve another creature require you to roll above this number

  • during another creature's turn, physical actions against you will require them to roll above this number, while mental actions against you require them to roll below this number

  • if your roll results in exactly the number you wrote on your sheet, that action is a fumble

  • if your roll results in exactly the number on your opponent's sheet, that action is a crit

  • if your number is exactly the same as the number on your opponent's sheet, reroll to determine if it is a fumble or a crit


NOTE: Fumbles by default have no real effect other than to initiate a comical scenario that explains why you (hilariously) failed to hit the target number.

Dot It
This represents your physical constitution. Each time you take damage, fill a dot. If the number of dots filled equals that of your chosen number, you suffer a defeat (which may or may not lead to death).

Whenever an attack that hits you is a crit, fill an additional dot.

Write It
Write here your signature move/spell/attack/ability/feature.

Draw It
Draw your character's signature equipment. If it's a wand, a sword, a dagger, a tree, a cannonball, a dragon scale, or even a halfling, feel free to draw it here.

Tally It
This helps monitor your immediate physical strain. For spellcasters, this is where you tally the number of times you have casted spells during a turn before strain kicks in. If you're into physical combat, you can choose to strain yourself by making additional attacks. Tally the attacks as follows:

normal attack: +0
one extra attack: +1
two extra attacks: +2
three extra attacks: +3
four extra attacks: +4
five extra attacks: +5

If the total tally (for both magic and physical combat) is greater than or equal to your chosen number, in addition to the normal punishment for casting under strain, any attempts to make additional attacks or cast additional spells causes you to fill a dot.

Color It
This represents how powerful your magic is versus how often you can cast magic. It doesn't matter what color you use to represent this, as long as you use two different colors. The primary color determines the number of spells you can cast in a fight without strain, while the secondary color determines how much power you can allocate in a spell per cast without strain. Fill a number of squares equal to your chosen number with your primary color, then fill the remaining squares with your secondary color.

A spell's power is determined by two factors:



  1. 1. Number of targets

  2. 2. Intensity of effect


Harmful spells cause targets to fill a dot, while helpful spells cause targets to clear a dot. Each target increases the spell's power requirement by one. A spellcaster may choose to intensify a spell, causing more dots to be filled or cleared, but the power requirement is increased by one for each target and for each additional point; for example, a spell that affects three PCs and clears two dots requires a total of 3 x 2 = 6 spell power points.

Whenever you experience strain from casting, fill a dot for each spell power point in excess of the given boundaries; for example, if you can only cast 5 times per fight without strain, then cast a spell in the 6th round that costs 2 points of spell power, fill 2 dots (even though you can normally cast a spell that is worth 5 spell power points). Another example: if you can only safely cast a spell worth 5 spell power points, and you cast a spell that's worth 6 power points, fill 1 dot.

Additional spell effects (especially those of the utilitarian variety) are to be discussed between you and the GM.

Circle It
This represents long-term physical strain. At the end of each fight, circle the next number in the sequence, then clear all dots, but leave a number of tallies equal to the encircled number. For instance, if you accumulated 7 tallies and it is your first fight of the day, at the end of the fight, encircle "1" and then remove all but one tally. Then if you accumulated a total of 4 tallies the next fight, encircle "2" and then remove all but two tallies.


At the end of each session, upon the group's discretion or when the group reaches a certain milestone as determined by the GM (usually 4-5 fights, or when a cinematic event occurs), clear all encircled numbers, dots and tallies. However, note that if the group chooses to initiate a "heal up" prematurely, they should remember that complications may occur as a result.




So in this TRPG, the chosen number serves as your physique, limiter on number of attacks/spells per turn, and overall endurance (HP, number of fights you can go through without issue).  Magic is open-ended, powerful yet limited by your own physique, which makes it fairly deadly yet rewarding at the same time.  Also, you could easily tweak this to have this work on any sort of die, so regardless if you go for d6s or percentile dice, the mechanics still work exactly the same way (although you may have to scale up the "Write This" part for percentiles into intervals of 10s [+0, +10, +20, +30, +40] and for d20 into intervals of 2s [+0, +2, +4, +6, +8], to limit the number of attacks).

But the best part is, the mechanics should be simple enough that even a 5-year old can at least play, so long as he remembers the bit where he and the GM talk how their spells could work.

To clarify on the spellcasting bit:

If a spellcaster wrote "7" on his character sheet, he can choose to cast up to four times (0 + 1 + 2 + 3 = 6) per turn, with spells that are at intensity 1-3; maybe he has a lot of cantrip-like spells, maybe he can heal 1 dot from four PCs or 4 dots from one PC... or he can even cast one healing spell to one PC that removes one dot, attack with his fist with his second attack, then face-grab the enemy he just punched (3rd attack) and throw him at the nearest enemy (4th attack), dealing two damage to the enemy he punched and threw to the other enemy, who takes one damage.

Meanwhile, if he wrote "1" on his character sheet, he can only cast once per turn, and only one spell per fight, but that can easily be a death ray that insta-gibs anything that is unlucky enough to be in the way, or a missile massacre that dishes out one dot's worth of damage to up to ten enemies.

Obviously this game didn't take monster stats into consideration, since it was made merely as a theoretical exercise, but I see no harm in monsters using a different set of mechanics, or even introducing a leveling system, wherein you all start off with d4s or even d2s (coin flip) and end up with d10s or even d12s, gaining +2 to the chosen number per "level", allowing groups to use monsters that share the same character sheets as PCs, so there's a feeling of mechanical growth, without having to add excessively complex mechanics.
 
Show

You are Red/Blue!
Take The Magic Dual Colour Test - Beta today!
Created with Rum and Monkey's Personality Test Generator.

You are both rational and emotional. You value creation and discovery, and feel strongly about what you create. At best, you're innovative and intuitive. At worst, you're scattered and unpredictable.

D&D Home Page - What Monster Are You? - D&D Compendium

57047238 wrote:
If you're crossing the street and see a city bus barreling straight toward you with 'GIVE ME YOUR WALLET!' painted across its windshield, you probably won't be reaching for your wallet.
I Don't Always Play Strikers...But When I Do, I Prefer Vampire Stay Thirsty, My Friends
This is what I believe is the spirit of D&D 4E, and my deal breaker for D&D Next: equal opportunities, with distinct specializations, in areas where conflict happens the most often, without having to worry about heavy micromanagement or system mastery. What I hope to be my most useful contributions to the D&D Community: DM Idea: Collaborative Mapping, Classless 4E (homebrew system, that hopefully helps in D&D Next development), Gamma World 7E random character generator (by yours truly), and the Concept of Perfect Imbalance (for D&D Next and other TRPGs in development) Pre-3E D&D should be recognized for what they were: simulation wargames where people could tell stories with The Best Answer to "Why 4E?" Fun vs. Engaging
I am a DM who regularly brings my kids to game day.  They watch a lot of Dora, and my daughter's pretty crafty so we bring a lot of projects for her to work on.  A lot of time I'm wearing one of the kids while we game and they nap.  Other than that, I think it's the parent's job to treat gaming like the set of time you set aside for chores, or dinner with friends, or whatever.  You set up something for them to do, you keep on eye on them, and you expect of them the ability to let you do mommy or daddy's thing for a bit.  I think it's the non-parent's responsibility to understand that kids mean more frequent short breaks and some background noise, though you don't necessarily have to sacrifice focus for these.  

And bribery works great. 
Outstanding suggestions and advice!  Big thanks!  I have tried letting the 5 year old Rogue draw on the white board while we play.  That lasts about an hour.  Helping role dice is good for awhile but sometimes evolves into the desire to role "everyone's" dice.  I'm considering buying a few kids DVDs to keep on hand for these last second surprises.  We have "Bolt", "Cinderella" and "Cats and Dogs 2" but those aren't popular.

Keep the ideas coming! 
I'm considering buying a few kids DVDs to keep on hand for these last second surprises.  We have "Bolt", "Cinderella" and "Cats and Dogs 2" but those aren't popular.

Keep the ideas coming! 



I hate to say it, but buying DVDs is not all that cost effective.  Decent movies run at least $20 a pop. Both of my next suggestions require a streaming only Netflix and/or Hulu account and/or an iTunes account.

For the cost of five or six good movies you can pick up an Apple TV (they retail for $100) and then you can access your Netflix and/or Hulu accounts (among others) on your TV and have umpteen thousand movies and TV shows kids can watch.  Not to mention all the content YOU can watch when not gaming .  Further, if you have an iTunes account (even on a Windows PC), the Apple TV connects wirelessly to that as well and you can watch movies you have on your computer through the Apple TV (as long as you have iTunes installed on that computer).

I actually have this setup - I have an Apple TV in my living room, my Windows 8 computer with iTunes is in a different room (on a different floor).  I have ripped all the DVDs I own to my computer's hard drive.  So long as I have iTunes running on my Windows 8 PC I can watch all my movies on my living room TV.

OR

connect a laptop to a TV and run movies through the laptop.  Most LCD/LED TVs today have a VGA or DVI connector.  The resolution probably won't be 1080p but it should be good enough that the kids won't care.  Login to whatever account you have and stream movies through the laptop.

This is what I used to do before I got my Apple TV .

 

IMAGE(http://www.nodiatis.com/pub/19.jpg)

Are you really "entitled to your opinion"?
RedSiegfried wrote:
The cool thing is, you don't even NEED a reason to say yes.  Just stop looking for a reason to say no.
The big struggle is that no single activity will occupy the kids for the entirety of a good gaming session.  Your plan to come up with multiple activities is a good one.  If the rogue wants to get involved, you can ask that s/he draw pictures of each of your characters, or monsters, or even what the temples, dungeons look like from the outside.  Again, I'm a big fan of crafts and making kids clean up after themselves, so there's a good amount of time that can be eaten up there.  If rogue is doing math already, the DM can ask him to secretly roll dice, add modifiers and give those numbers to the DM for the next few attack rolls.  If there are spare minis, rogue can do a Hero Quest style adventure with spare maps or battle mats and doing a simple anything over a 10 is a hit, each monster can take 2 hits, heroes can take 5 thing.

As for DVDs, variety is the spice of life.  Until they find a favorite.  And then that's all they want to watch.  If you have Netflix there is a ton of kids shows to choose from on the streaming side, enough to turn them into mush for a long time.   
I'll preface by saying I have a 6 year old daughter who's been frequenting my sessions as both a player and a dam since she was 1. I think the best advice is be patient. Streaming tv shows and movies can usually occupy big chunks of time as well. But bottom line is, the mom/dad is going to have split their time. Just be adaptable and play around it. If that character is not doing anything essential, just keep the game moving and fill them back in. Let the other players take the spotlight for a bit.

The big struggle is that no single activity will occupy the kids for the entirety of a good gaming session.  Your plan to come up with multiple activities is a good one.  If the rogue wants to get involved, you can ask that s/he draw pictures of each of your characters, or monsters, or even what the temples, dungeons look like from the outside.  Again, I'm a big fan of crafts and making kids clean up after themselves, so there's a good amount of time that can be eaten up there.  If rogue is doing math already, the DM can ask him to secretly roll dice, add modifiers and give those numbers to the DM for the next few attack rolls.  If there are spare minis, rogue can do a Hero Quest style adventure with spare maps or battle mats and doing a simple anything over a 10 is a hit, each monster can take 2 hits, heroes can take 5 thing.

As for DVDs, variety is the spice of life.  Until they find a favorite.  And then that's all they want to watch.  If you have Netflix there is a ton of kids shows to choose from on the streaming side, enough to turn them into mush for a long time.   



Crafts?   Now that's a clever idea!  I can pick up some markers and activity books.  You are correct that no single activity does seem to keep the attention of the child.
I'll preface by saying I have a 6 year old daughter who's been frequenting my sessions as both a player and a dam since she was 1. I think the best advice is be patient. Streaming tv shows and movies can usually occupy big chunks of time as well. But bottom line is, the mom/dad is going to have split their time. Just be adaptable and play around it. If that character is not doing anything essential, just keep the game moving and fill them back in. Let the other players take the spotlight for a bit.




Since we play a more adult themed game I doubt it would be a good intro for a 6 year old.  That said I am certain others can adapt campaigns to fit with a child Player.

Parents must be prepared to take some time off during the night to work with kids is a given.  I suppose the rest of the Players must also adjust expectations to deal with a tiny guest(s). 
Crafts?   Now that's a clever idea!  I can pick up some markers and activity books.

Maybe paint and unpainted miniatures? Scissors and paper terrain?

Crafts?   Now that's a clever idea!  I can pick up some markers and activity books.

Maybe paint and unpainted miniatures? Scissors and paper terrain?




Now that's productive thinking!
RIP George! 4-21-11 RIP Abie! 1-2-13
Funny Forum Quotes
[quote author=82733368 post=532127449]
58115148 wrote:
"You notice a large piece of mold clinging to your toothbrush. What do you do?" "I cast Fireball." "I run like hell!
63797881 wrote:
The standard d4 is somewhat (SOMEWHAT) rounded on the top, the older models are even flat. The Lego is shaped in such a way that in an emergency, you can use one as a makeshift surgical knife.
147742801 wrote:
57457938 wrote:
My wife asked me if her pants made her look fat. What do you think I said?
Wife: Do these pants make me look fat? RedSiegfried: I just killed a bunch of orc women and children.
63797881 wrote:
82733368 wrote:
28.) Making a "Drunken Master" style character (Monk or otherwise) does not require my character to be completely shitfaced, no matter what the name (and fun interpretation) implies.
29.) Making a "Drunken Master" style character does not require ME to be completely tanked, no matter how "in-character" I want to be..
My 8 year old boy and 12 year old daughter are 2 of my players. Suprisingly my 8 year old roleplays his butt off. I say suprisingly because he is a video game freak and I never would have dreamed he would go for the non-visual stimulation. My 3 year old is usally around but he is happy watching his Caiou (sp?). He slips in every now and then to steal some of our chips and dip but he does it quietly.
Crafts?   Now that's a clever idea!  I can pick up some markers and activity books.

Maybe paint and unpainted miniatures? Scissors and paper terrain?


I concur.  +1

Can't wait until my daughter is old enough for that kind of fun. 
Depends on how old they are.
Younger kids might be able to be "babysat" by the TV but might get bored more easily and require more supervision.  

5 Minute WorkdayMy Webcomic Updated Tue & Thur

The compilation of my Worldbuilding blog series is now available: 

Jester David's How-To Guide to Fantasy Worldbuilding.

I am a DM and a father of 2 children (1-10 yr/old, 1-6 yr/old) and I would NEVER bring them both to game night. No offense, but I think it's unfair to the other players in the group to have to put up with that disruption. The guy who owns the house that my group plays D&D in has 2 kids who are incredibly well-behaved and they don't interfere, but that's not typical. I, myself, had to wait until my youngest was moderately independent and section off that time for myself. I started with Encounters and met some people with with whom I formed a group. Game night is Daddy's time and that's that. A parent owes their child/children their full attention. I don't mean to come off as a self-righteous prick, but, you gotta do what you gotta do. 


D&D Home Page - What Class Are You? - Build A Character - D&D Compendium

src="http://www.wizards.com/dnd/monster/images/banners/13.jpg"/>
D&D Home Page - What Monster Are You? - D&D Compendium

 

I am a DM and a father of 2 children (1-10 yr/old, 1-6 yr/old) and I would NEVER bring them both to game night. No offense, but I think it's unfair to the other players in the group to have to put up with that disruption. The guy who owns the house that my group plays D&D in has 2 kids who are incredibly well-behaved and they don't interfere, but that's not typical. I, myself, had to wait until my youngest was moderately independent and section off that time for myself. I started with Encounters and met some people with with whom I formed a group. Game night is Daddy's time and that's that. A parent owes their child/children their full attention. I don't mean to come off as a self-righteous prick, but, you gotta do what you gotta do. 

I don't think you come off self-righteous at all, and I'm the one advocating bringing kids along.  You've got to do what's best for your kids and your sanity.  What works for me may not work for you.

You are a better person than I am ;) If a friend of mine would show up unexpectedly with a child at a game in my house, I would actually be very irritated. It is not that I don't trust the person in question to keep their children entertained without disrupting the game, but in the fact that my house is not particular child friendly and a small child would require constant supervision. Also even if my house was child friendly, I would expect the parents to provide the enterainment for the childeren. Don't expect me to buy toys, especially not when the childeren have boxes filled with toys at home - my house is cluttered enough as it is ;)

Of course, RL can happen. When it does though, we usually relocate our game to the house of the parents, continue without the parent or cancel the session (potentially doing something else that is more child friendly). It is certainly easier to keep a child entertained at their own house, and nobody is going to have fun if a child constantly disrupts the game. I will admit though that with a weekly session, we are usually not too bothered when one session is missed.

I am a DM and a father of 2 children (1-10 yr/old, 1-6 yr/old) and I would NEVER bring them both to game night. No offense, but I think it's unfair to the other players in the group to have to put up with that disruption. The guy who owns the house that my group plays D&D in has 2 kids who are incredibly well-behaved and they don't interfere, but that's not typical. I, myself, had to wait until my youngest was moderately independent and section off that time for myself. I started with Encounters and met some people with with whom I formed a group. Game night is Daddy's time and that's that. A parent owes their child/children their full attention. I don't mean to come off as a self-righteous prick, but, you gotta do what you gotta do. 



You are not being self-righteous.  I started this thread because I could sense some grumbling among the other players and wanted to see if I could find some other techniques to help my group.  Honestly the disruptions are frequent and timed almost 15 minutes apart.  I can be a pain when suddenly I have to micro wave dinner for the little rogue and miss my turn or don't over hear that the Cleric just gave me a bonus to all attacks and saves.

You are a better person than I am ;) If a friend of mine would show up unexpectedly with a child at a game in my house, I would actually be very irritated. It is not that I don't trust the person in question to keep their children entertained without disrupting the game, but in the fact that my house is not particular child friendly and a small child would require constant supervision. Also even if my house was child friendly, I would expect the parents to provide the enterainment for the childeren. Don't expect me to buy toys, especially not when the childeren have boxes filled with toys at home - my house is cluttered enough as it is ;)

Of course, RL can happen. When it does though, we usually relocate our game to the house of the parents, continue without the parent or cancel the session (potentially doing something else that is more child friendly). It is certainly easier to keep a child entertained at their own house, and nobody is going to have fun if a child constantly disrupts the game. I will admit though that with a weekly session, we are usually not too bothered when one session is missed.




I agree with you.  It's an uneasy feeling knowing a small person, who is very curious, might be exploring the house while you play.  My wife owns some rare collectables "Lilliput Lane" that look like toys to a child.  The rogue who randomly visits game night is very curious about them and not the most gentle.

Sign In to post comments