Cost of living

Hi all,
         just wondering how much it would cost for room and board and such at various level of status. i know older editions had stuff but money has changed between editions 
Just use one of the other editions for now. Or search around online. They do not have rules for this
It should be based off what the plot needs, not off of what a table says.

Stop the H4TE

Hi all,
         just wondering how much it would cost for room and board and such at various level of status. i know older editions had stuff but money has changed between editions 



Without trying to sound adversarial or obtuse, why would cost of living vary based upon level?  
Hi all,
         just wondering how much it would cost for room and board and such at various level of status. i know older editions had stuff but money has changed between editions 



Without trying to sound adversarial or obtuse, why would cost of living vary based upon level?  



Not level (1st, 5th, 12th etc) .  Level of status (commoner, upper class, royalty, etc).
Level =/= status


Without trying to sound adversarial or obtuse, why would cost of living vary based upon level?  



The OP said level of status, not level of character.

For example, Commoner - 1 cp/week, Merchant - 1 sp/week, Noble - 1 gp/week.



I generally assume that an average daily wage for a reasonably well-off commoner (they're well-fed, they can buy new clothes when they need them, they go drinking at the inn once or twice a week) is about 1 sp.  Taxes and such apply so their take-home weekly wage is about 4-6 sp.  I find if the average commoner has less to work with than that, too many things end up with a price between 1-4 cp because otherwise they'd all starve to death.
The difference between madness and genius is determined only by degrees of success.
It should be based off what the plot needs, not off of what a table says.

Some people obviously disagree with that. Some people want things in the plot to work by predetermined rules for the world, not the world to work for the sake of the plot.

Anki, that's a good analysis. I seem to remember in 2nd there was a rule of thumb that an average skilled craftsman (journeyman) would make roughly a gold (2 sp a day, 5 days of work - even d&d has days off and holy days) a week if they had work at the time.
Hi all,
         just wondering how much it would cost for room and board and such at various level of status. i know older editions had stuff but money has changed between editions 



In 2E, the DMG shows the cost of living as:

Lifestyle:..........Cost per Month:

Squalid......................3 GP
Poor..........................5 GP
Middle-Class...........50 GP per level
Wealthy....................200 GP per level

In 2E, the exhange rate was:

10 CP for 1 SP
5 SP for 1 EP
2 EP for 1 GP
5 GP for 1 PP

3 GP per month would be 30 SP, so squalid living conditions would cost about 1 SP per day.
5 GP per month would be 50 SP, so poor living conditions would cost about 1 SP, 6 CP per day.
Middle-class living conditions would cost about 1 GP, 5 SP per day.
Wealthy living conditions would cost about 6 GP, 5 SP per day.

Of course, all of the above are give-or-take prices that will fluctuate wildly from area to area.

"The world is indeed comic, but the joke is on mankind." - H.P. Lovecraft
thanks for responses, that is good to hear. how has the value of money changed over edition? i know 4e money was very important for character levelling but now it isn't with no market for magic items. is it closest to second edition?
With the philosophy of money and game design, 2e would seem to be a decent estimate

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thanks for responses, that is good to hear. how has the value of money changed over edition? i know 4e money was very important for character levelling but now it isn't with no market for magic items. is it closest to second edition?


Side-by-side exchange info:

BECMI:
10 CP for 1 SP
10 SP for 1 GP
5 GP for 1 PP

1E:
10 CP for 1 SP
20 SP for 1 GP
5 GP for 1 PP

2E:
10 CP for 1 SP
10 SP for 1 GP
5 GP for 1 PP

3.5:
10 CP for 1 SP
10 SP for 1 GP
10 GP for 1 PP

4E:
10 CP for 1 SP
10 SP for 1 GP
100 GP for 1 PP

DDN:
10 CP for 1 SP
10 SP for 1 GP
10 GP for 1 PP

With the exception of 1E, the only time it gets swingy is when you get higher than GP. As far as what the cost of living would be, it would seem that, between editions, it wouldn't really be that different.
"The world is indeed comic, but the joke is on mankind." - H.P. Lovecraft

Side-by-side exchange info:

(snipped)

With the exception of 1E, the only time it gets swingy is when you get higher than GP. As far as what the cost of living would be, it would seem that, between editions, it wouldn't really be that different.



The actual value of differing coins relative to each other, and the value of 1 GP to a player character, are very different things.


For example, in 2E, you can buy the most powerful items in the game (assuming you could actually find someone selling them) for about 100,000 gp.  (that is, they have a GP value listed of about 100k).  In 3E, that same level of power would cost you 200,000.  In 4E, 3.125 million.  (The fact that 4E goes stock up to level 30, however, might reasonably alter this.  A level 20 item in 4E costs 125,000 gp.  The question of whether or not level 20 = level 20 is one that I'm ignoring for now.)
The difference between madness and genius is determined only by degrees of success.
Some people obviously disagree with that. Some people want things in the plot to work by predetermined rules for the world, not the world to work for the sake of the plot.

But if not for the plot, nothing in the world needs to work at all.

I've always gone by the rough idea that a commoner makes about 1sp a month, altho they have a small garden and probably sew/repair most of their own clothing and household items. With approximate averages based upon wages worked, etc, you can guesstimate a copper piece being about $2.50 in modern USD.

This disintegrates quickly when you realize most mid-level characters in previous editions could absolutely wreck a whole economy (and be able to comfortably retire by level 5); it also doesn't hold up well as far as "Save us from the undead hordes! Here is 350gp (which is about how much you need for your level for this to even matter) that we don't even know how we afford!".

And all of this can vary wildly based upon your campaign. 1gp in Dark Sun is not 1gp in Forgotten Realms is not 1gp in Eberron.

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This is somthing that would depends on campaign setting.
 
That's the main reason that it's probably better to not think about it too much, especially when dealing with such small numbers as 10 SP. Trying to relate a fantasy economy where things like magic swords and armor that sell for thousands of GP exist to any kind of real-world, historical economy is a headache in the making, not to mention a thought process doomed to failure. The first time a small village offers to pay the PC's 1,000 GP to save them from the goblin attackers, any kind of real-world correlation goes straight out the window. Same thing if you give a shop-keep 5,000 GP for an item. He just became the wealthiest person in the kingdom if you try to relate that economy to any kind of real-world alternative.

The D&D economy has basically always existed in a vacuum. It is there solely for the PCs. It's just another game mechanic to facilitate earned rewards vs. items wanted. Trying to dig too much more into it makes the whole thing look ridiculous from any angle. The PCs could technically retire by level 5. Along that same vein, every time a PC buys something after about level 3 or 4, whoever they bought it from could, themselves, retire. So, like I said, better to not dwell on it and just think of money as another resource to manage while playing a game.

"The world is indeed comic, but the joke is on mankind." - H.P. Lovecraft
But if not for the plot, nothing in the world needs to work at all.

Some people disgree with that, too. For some of us, if a tree falls in the forest and the players aren't there to hear it, not only does it make a sound, it might land on an elf and kill them.

And it may never even impact the plot.
In the end this tread is about fantasy economy.

What is the avarage income ?
Under what income are you considerd poor ?

what does the  150 Gp starting funds represent ?
is it selling everything you owned before coming a adventurer, or is it a amount that a avarage person could save up in a few years ? 
1d6
1-2: Poor quality inn (cost's copper)
3-4: decent quality inn (cost's silver)
5-6: decent quality inn (cost's gold) 

1d6 for cost per day in copper/silver/gold. The better quality the inn the more likely they are to give a discount in bulk buys. There you go. 

Stop the H4TE

I used the same methodology as others in here. The conversion rate between the tiers of currency is the same as originally intended, so I just use AD&D 2nd edition prices to buy other items that aren't listed yet.   
1d6
1-2: Poor quality inn (cost's copper)
3-4: decent quality inn (cost's silver)
5-6: decent quality inn (cost's gold) 

1d6 for cost per day in copper/silver/gold. The better quality the inn the more likely they are to give a discount in bulk buys. There you go. 



is an order of magnitude increase in prices really justfied. is the worst hotel 10% of the price of a decent hotel.

i more wondering about goods and inflation, apparently differen campaign settings have different goods and so different economies (i can totally understand that as eberron has tech available while water is scarce in dark sun) and economies can easily be broken. so no drama's, just use 2ed when i need unspecified guidelines seems right to me
cheers



Without trying to sound adversarial or obtuse, why would cost of living vary based upon level?  



The OP said level of status, not level of character.

For example, Commoner - 1 cp/week, Merchant - 1 sp/week, Noble - 1 gp/week.



I generally assume that an average daily wage for a reasonably well-off commoner (they're well-fed, they can buy new clothes when they need them, they go drinking at the inn once or twice a week) is about 1 sp.  Taxes and such apply so their take-home weekly wage is about 4-6 sp.  I find if the average commoner has less to work with than that, too many things end up with a price between 1-4 cp because otherwise they'd all starve to death.




D'oh, I'm sorry about that.  Reading fail
Wel if the avarage wage would be 1 sp per day this would that a character would have to have spent at least 4 years working a avarage job and spending nothing to afford his 150 Gp starting gear.
Asuming 50% would be spend on food shelter and other living expenses it it is more realistic it would take him about 8 years to get his 150 Gp. starting equipment.

so each character should have a background story about how he gained such wealth.
 
Hi all,
         just wondering how much it would cost for room and board and such at various level of status. i know older editions had stuff but money has changed between editions 



3e/PF says this:








































Inn stay, good (per night)2 gpCRB
Inn stay, common (per night)5 spCRB
Inn stay, poor (per night)2 spCRB
Inn suite, small4 gpUE
Inn suite, average16 gpUE
Inn suite, luxurious32 gp+UE


As has been mentioned, 1sp is the daily wage of a poor untrained labourer. They pull in close to a gold every couple weeks after taxes. A single successful adventure (50gp) is like earning two-year's worth of pay. 

Think of that as a shift working pulling in minumum wage. That's about $50 a day. That's a good wealth baseline for how much things might concievably cost. That same 50gp adventure is like earning $25,000. It's nice but you can't retire. 

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Keep in mind the peasant also would hopefully be farming and there would be lots of barter.
If you really want to trip look at the price of Platemail. 4e was the only edition that game close.

I handle it like this
A mat in the barn is almost free. A good cha score on a friendly chap will get you that.

30 gp and you can plop down in the King's castle.

10 gp and you get the best room in a town for a week

Everying else is in silver with at most one gold a night at the best locals.  

Wel if the avarage wage would be 1 sp per day this would that a character would have to have spent at least 4 years working a avarage job and spending nothing to afford his 150 Gp starting gear.
Asuming 50% would be spend on food shelter and other living expenses it it is more realistic it would take him about 8 years to get his 150 Gp. starting equipment.

so each character should have a background story about how he gained such wealth.
 



Correction:  4 years of saving at a reasonably well-off commoner's wage.

A reasonably well-off commoner is just barely above the poverty line.  A guard, merchant, journeyman craftsmen, alchemist, wizard, or just about any other job would pay an amount more ranging from 'somewhat more' to 'massively more'.
The difference between madness and genius is determined only by degrees of success.