Sea Sickness

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Hail,

I am preparing to run an adventure where we open on a boat. Does D&D have any effects on sea sickness penalities?

-J. 
An easy improv would be fort save DC 15 or be nauseated for x amount of time.  Usually irl people who get seasick get it really bad once, get over it, and are fine.  If there are rules, and you are using 3.5, then check Stormwrack.
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If you're dealing with 4E, seasickness probably wouldn't be a factor unless someone wants it to be a factor for their character (and for most people, it isn't much of one). You'd be more likely to see DCs adjusted based on external circumstances (a storm-tossed deck is going to raise the DC for most Acrobatics or Athletics checks, for example).
Hail,

I am preparing to run an adventure where we open on a boat. Does D&D have any effects on sea sickness penalities?

-J. 

Before you start the adventure and slap penalties on the PCs just because they're there, you should think about whether your players will think that starting the adventure with an unavoidable penalty, or even a penalty that may or may not happen based on a random die roll, would add fun to the game for them.  

Also, if the group likes stuff like this, you should consider whether or not there should be some way they can avoid the penalty or even gain a bonus instead, which is a fair way of doing it instead of a situation that can only result in penalties or nothing.  IOW, some sort of skill challenge would be the way to go.

Don't just say "Okay, you're on a boat, everyone roll to see if you're seasick."  That would be pretty lame. 

OD&D, 1E and 2E challenged the player. 3E challenged the character, not the player. Now 4E takes it a step further by challenging a GROUP OF PLAYERS to work together as a TEAM. That's why I love 4E.

"Your ability to summon a horde of celestial superbeings at will is making my ... BMX skills look a bit redundant."

"People treat their lack of imagination as if it's the measure of what's silly. Which is silly." - Noon

"Challenge" is overrated.  "Immersion" is usually just a more pretentious way of saying "having fun playing D&D."

"Falling down is how you grow.  Staying down is how you die.  It's not what happens to you, it's what you do after it happens.”

Hail,

I am preparing to run an adventure where we open on a boat. Does D&D have any effects on sea sickness penalities?

-J. 

Before you start the adventure and slap penalties on the PCs just because they're there, you should think about whether your players will think that starting the adventure with an unavoidable penalty, or even a penalty that may or may not happen based on a random die roll, would add fun to the game for them.  

Also, if the group likes stuff like this, you should consider whether or not there should be some way they can avoid the penalty or even gain a bonus instead, which is a fair way of doing it instead of a situation that can only result in penalties or nothing.  IOW, some sort of skill challenge would be the way to go.

Don't just say "Okay, you're on a boat, everyone roll to see if you're seasick."  That would be pretty lame. 



this was kind of what I was thinking, it doesn't sound "fun"

what might be more fun is to do things with terrain, its slick, maybe add 1 to all pushes/slides
maybe let a player add a push to his attack on a roll of 18+

Idunno, but puke doesn't sound fun, unless it makes for an improvised breath weapon... hmm...
Hail,

I am preparing to run an adventure where we open on a boat. Does D&D have any effects on sea sickness penalities?

-J. 

Before you start the adventure and slap penalties on the PCs just because they're there, you should think about whether your players will think that starting the adventure with an unavoidable penalty, or even a penalty that may or may not happen based on a random die roll, would add fun to the game for them.  

Also, if the group likes stuff like this, you should consider whether or not there should be some way they can avoid the penalty or even gain a bonus instead, which is a fair way of doing it instead of a situation that can only result in penalties or nothing.  IOW, some sort of skill challenge would be the way to go.

Don't just say "Okay, you're on a boat, everyone roll to see if you're seasick."  That would be pretty lame. 



this was kind of what I was thinking, it doesn't sound "fun"

what might be more fun is to do things with terrain, its slick, maybe add 1 to all pushes/slides
maybe let a player add a push to his attack on a roll of 18+

Idunno, but puke doesn't sound fun, unless it makes for an improvised breath weapon... hmm...


Penalties should be the exception, not the norm.  Ask the players if any of their characters have particularly weak sea stomachs, and if those seasick PCs would be willing to fight under penalty — usually players are fine with such penalties provided they were inflicted with their consent, usually with the "well, it makes sense" — or do something else to contribute to the scene.

As for terrain features on the high seas, I highly recommend that you look at AKAN2-01: Set Adrift. Lots of ideas there
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57047238 wrote:
If you're crossing the street and see a city bus barreling straight toward you with 'GIVE ME YOUR WALLET!' painted across its windshield, you probably won't be reaching for your wallet.
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it completely depends on your group.  The group I play for would relish in role-playing seasickness.  So making that DC 15 Fort save makes sense for my group...even if it would be a penalty.

As a matter of fact, I recently ran a session where that party was on a river boat and they ran into a storm with heavy wind and driving rain.  My assumption was that on this particular river boat - that ran back and forth on a narrow and shallow tributary - that the crew might also be affected by seasickness.  So the party and the crew rolled that DC 15 fort save and while the whole party made that save, two crew members failed.  This resulted in the boat having to slow down - to give the remaining crew more time to make course corrections and the like - and gave the encounter I had planned a better chance of success, although it was still a rout due to good use of spells and abilities by the players.

 

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The cool thing is, you don't even NEED a reason to say yes.  Just stop looking for a reason to say no.
Roleplay it, don't require rolls or impose actual penalties. Being hit with sea sickness is pretty deprotagonizing, so let players decide for themselves if it would be funny, and allow them to roleplay it. It would make a good scapegoat for any ones the player rolls.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

While I don't think DMing is about alway making things hard for the PC's a little bit of rough water is fair game every now and then. So to all the people saying that being sea sick wouldn't be fun for the players so you shouldn't do it I so screw that noise. To me tossing in an unenjoyable situation here and there is totally acceptable and makes victory all the sweeter. If you spoon feed everything to your players and don't make them eat their vegtibals they are never going to feel like they really earned anything and it wont be as enjoyable. But I think that using things that are "unfun" should be kept pretty low. If the PC's are going from one unfun thing to the next unfun thing they are going to burn out pretty quick.
While I don't think DMing is about alway making things hard for the PC's a little bit of rough water is fair game every now and then. So to all the people saying that being sea sick wouldn't be fun for the players so you shouldn't do it I so screw that noise. To me tossing in an unenjoyable situation here and there is totally acceptable and makes victory all the sweeter. If you spoon feed everything to your players and don't make them eat their vegtibals they are never going to feel like they really earned anything and it wont be as enjoyable. But I think that using things that are "unfun" should be kept pretty low. If the PC's are going from one unfun thing to the next unfun thing they are going to burn out pretty quick.

You're conflating "unfun" with "challenging." Something can be challenging, yet also fun and heroic. Fighting on a pitching, wave-swept deck could be very challenging, yet also fun and heroic. Fighting while trying not to barf is challenging, but also ridiculous. Some players like that, so they'll choose that. Great. Some players don't like that, and there's little benefit to forcing that challenge on them. That doesn't mean don't challenge them, that just means challenge them in a way they find interesting and heroic. If you can't think of what way that might be, talk to them.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

Given the choice between challenges that are fun and challenges that are not fun, always choose the former. There is absolutely no reason to spend even one second of game time on things that are not fun. I can't even believe people would suggest that.

Seasickness may be fun for your group, but to me, it's lame and unheroic. These are heroic adventurers facing the challenges threatening the world, not a bunch of tourists in Florida who can't hack a day cruise. Challenge them in other ways.

If, however, your group finds such a thing fun, I'd still make it fictional and not mechanical, and good for a few laughs before moving on to the real challenges. 

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Like I mentioned in my "annoying rules" thread, rules that force players to act silly even if the players don't want to act silly is just begging to result in a rage-fest, or at least a really un-fun session to say the least.  Sure, social contract could fix it, but by having a social contract in the first place means that the players agreeing to acting silly, so technically that's already the "want to act silly" part right there.

Like I said before, talk it over with the players, see if any of them don't mind having sea sickness barfing etc.  Forcing the issue — especially if done without their consent — can lead to some very unhappy gaming. 
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57047238 wrote:
If you're crossing the street and see a city bus barreling straight toward you with 'GIVE ME YOUR WALLET!' painted across its windshield, you probably won't be reaching for your wallet.
I Don't Always Play Strikers...But When I Do, I Prefer Vampire Stay Thirsty, My Friends
This is what I believe is the spirit of D&D 4E, and my deal breaker for D&D Next: equal opportunities, with distinct specializations, in areas where conflict happens the most often, without having to worry about heavy micromanagement or system mastery. What I hope to be my most useful contributions to the D&D Community: DM Idea: Collaborative Mapping, Classless 4E (homebrew system, that hopefully helps in D&D Next development), Gamma World 7E random character generator (by yours truly), and the Concept of Perfect Imbalance (for D&D Next and other TRPGs in development) Pre-3E D&D should be recognized for what they were: simulation wargames where people could tell stories with The Best Answer to "Why 4E?" Fun vs. Engaging
By the way, JimSeals, do you own an Auto Farm?

(If you get that reference, then you get that reference, I guess.)  ;)

OD&D, 1E and 2E challenged the player. 3E challenged the character, not the player. Now 4E takes it a step further by challenging a GROUP OF PLAYERS to work together as a TEAM. That's why I love 4E.

"Your ability to summon a horde of celestial superbeings at will is making my ... BMX skills look a bit redundant."

"People treat their lack of imagination as if it's the measure of what's silly. Which is silly." - Noon

"Challenge" is overrated.  "Immersion" is usually just a more pretentious way of saying "having fun playing D&D."

"Falling down is how you grow.  Staying down is how you die.  It's not what happens to you, it's what you do after it happens.”

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