New (homebrew) Oath for paladins. Meet the Justicar!

Hey all,

Well I'm not enamored of the paladin so far. I think it has a lot of sameness to the Cleric and there isn't much that distinguishes itself from the Cleric. That being said, I still get the creative jucies flowing from time to time and when I read the Write-UP of the Warden, I liked what I saw but didn't think the idea of a LG or LN alignment fit the concept. That, to me, just isn't how a Warden operates. So I created my own LN variant that strives to seek order between both Cavalier (LG) and Blackguard/Anti-Paladin (LE). Thus, the Justicar or Gray Guard / Gray Knight is born. Obviously the concept already exists and has been done before in previous editions and I think that the LN alignment works well for its intended purpose. I'll post my option first then go into the reason of how and why I came up with it.


Oath of the Justicar


Sometimes referred to as the Gray Knight or Gray Guard, a Justicar is the embodiment of law and order. They are not swayed by the moral principles of what society deems right or wrong as there is only law and people of both good and evil can break it. Justicars are the arbiters of edicts between the people and the bureaucracy and strive to maintain order in a chaotic world.  



Alignment (Optional): You must be lawful neutral.
Channel Divinity: You gain the Brand of Justice (see below), Divine Smite, and Turn Undead options.
Justicar Spells: Add the following spells to your spell list.

Spell
Level              Domain Spell
1                      Cause Fear
2                      Hold Person
3                      Speak with Dead
4                      Freedom of Movement
5                      True Seeing


Brand of Justice
When you hit a creature with a melee attack using a weapon with which you have proficiency, you can expend the use of your Channel Divinity to brand your enemies. When you do, each creature you choose within 10 ft. of you must make a Wisdom saving throw (DC equals your spell save DC). Creatures that fail the save only deal half damage with any successful weapon-based attack they make. In addition, they cannot move more than 10 ft. away from you for 1 minute. On its turn a branded creature can use its action to make a Wisdom check (DC equals your spell save DC) to end the effects.  

Level 8: Mount


Benefit: You can call a special mount, the form of which depends on your oath. A Justicar calls a Great Hound to his service. This beast often takes the form of a domesticated dog such as a Mastiff, Rotweiler, or even a Shepard. You have an empathic link with your mount and can sense the direction and distance to it, provided that both of you are on the same plane. You can telepathically communicate simple concepts and ideas to your mount, which can return thoughts through the same link.  While you are riding your mount, attack rolls against it have disadvantage.  If your mount is killed, you must call another one.

Great Hound
Large Beast
Armor Class
16 (scale barding)
Hit Points 60 (8d10 + 16); resistance to damage from non-magical weapons
Speed 60 ft.
Str 17 (+3)                   Dex 14 (+2)                 Con 14 (+2)
Int 10 (+0)                   Wis 12 (+1)                 Cha 10 (+0)
Alignment lawful neutral
Languages —

TRAITS                                                                                                                       
Keen Senses: The great hound gains a +5 bonus to all checks to detect hidden creatures.

Magic Resistance: The great hound has advantage on saving throws against magical effcts.

Enduring Pursuit: A great hound can move triple its speed while hustling.

ACTONS                                                                                                                      
Multiattack: The great hound makes two bite attacks.

Melee Attack—Bite: +5 to hit (reach 5 ft.; one creature)
Hit: 10 (2d6 + 3) piercing damage. If the attack deals maximum damage, the great hound also knocks the target prone.

ENCOUNTER BUILDING                                                                                              
Level 6              XP 875
 

 
Ok, so first the name. The term Justicar is the arbiter of Law. The enforcer of order. They strive to maintain balance and uphold the peace. They're gray because their not shining paragons of virtue such as the White Knight and they're not ruthless tyrants like the Black Knight. They often encompass both to maintain a strong sense of authority and power. 

Second, the alignment restriction. Anyone who's seen me post on the Paladin threads knows I'm against restrictions almost instantly. This is why I put the restriction (Optional) there. Its there for Players and DM to discuss how strong of an option is should be or be in the game in the first place.

Third, Channel Divinity Options. I figured Divine Smite was a good option because Justicars often have to dole out justice and fight, thus smites are often invoked. Also, many undead are against the natural order of things and as such, Turn Undead is a better solution to an unruly creature. Third, I created myself because I wasn't thrilled with the other two options.

Fourth, Domain Spells. 1st level is Cause Fear and I chose this because a Justicar should be making law-breakes quiver with fear of retribution and punishment. It's a good way to make criminals wet themselves. 2nd level is Hold Person and I chose this because there are times when Criminal will attempt to escape. This spell helps hold them in place for manticles or swift justic (ie, Execution). 3rd level is Speak with Dead. I chose this because often times Justicars are local law enforcement and assigned cases that involve victims. Speaking with these dead souls helps solve their crimes and bring those people to justice. 4th level is Freedom of Movement. I chose this because Criminal are crafty and they might want to make their escape better (or just outright stop a Justiar) by placing spells or hampering their movement. This spell helps allow a chase to continue. 5th level is True Seeing and I chose this because the guilty should not be able to hide. Plus it helps weed out those who might not appear who they are and help with crime scenes.


Well there ya go. I'm sure I'll get people who'll shoot these options full of holes but thats OK. I like constructive criticism. I like talking about how I an make this option better. So feel free to discuss and dismantle the Gray Knight and let me know if you like it, hate it, or even if you just feel "Meh" about it. But I do ask that any criticism is also followed by a suggestion to make it better. 

Thanks!            


EDIT: Just finished with the Great Hound mount. I made the description vague so that each individual Justicar has some room for adaptation for what they preceive their Great Hound to be. Some picture a large Mastiff while another might enjoy something like a St. Bernard or German Shepard or Great Dane (GIANT SCOOBY!). Anyways, the point is that the domesticated canine is something that I feel best embodies a companion of law enforcement, which is something of a staple point for Justicars. Obviously this might not suit everyone, which is why I'm also trying to create alternatives such as a Phantom Steed or even a Bulette (the idea is still something i think it cool, lol). Oh well, I hope you enjoy it!

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Looks pretty neat to me. The one little thing is that, unless you left it out on purpose, the oath should have a unique mount associated with it. (It's the one oath-based feature that's listed separately.)
Dwarves invented beer so they could toast to their axes. Dwarves invented axes to kill people and take their beer. Swanmay Syndrome: Despite the percentages given in the Monster Manual, in reality 100% of groups of swans contain a Swanmay, because otherwise the DM would not have put any swans in the game.
Heh, totally forgot about that. Nice catch. Well im open for ideas. Maybe a regal Dire Lion or a loyal Dire Wolf. What say you?
I like this build - it seems more appealing to me than any of the Paladin options in the official packet. Makes me think of Samara from Mass Effect. I like your Domain Spells, and Brand of Justice seems perfect for such a character.

The mount seems an issue. A Griffon could work, but flying might be too powerful an ability. There's always some sort of "grey" version of the standard horse.
Make the Justicar's mount a Medium or Light War Horse (as opposed to the Heavy Warhorse a "Cavalier" should get) for the extra speed.

EDIT: I like the Justicar better for the Lawful Neutral Paladin. I would make the Warden a True Neutral Paladin. 
I like this build - it seems more appealing to me than any of the Paladin options in the official packet. Makes me think of Samara from Mass Effect. I like your Domain Spells, and Brand of Justice seems perfect for such a character.

The mount seems an issue. A Griffon could work, but flying might be too powerful an ability. There's always some sort of "grey" version of the standard horse.



I too liked either the Griffon or Pegasus but flight does cause some concerns. I'm not sure that such an abiliy is too powerful since the Wizard gains access to Fly with a 3rd level spell at 5th level, 3 whole levels prior to a flying mount. But I see what your saying. The entire Justicar element reminds me of a gritty Police officer who's looking for trouble on his beat. I think of him as a person who delves in the every day problems and makes sure that when someone breaks the law he's there to stop him. IRL police associate with the K-9 and they share a very strong relationship. To me, a Dire Wolf makes a great asset to a Justicar to sniff out and track criminals.  

I'll write one up and see how it works.
Great hound vs Dire Wolf.

Like the difference between a huntsman and a predator.

Justice looks to find the quarry in service of that justice. Predator looks to hunt and kill for food or sport.


An interesting thought. Does it, however, break a bit of immersion to see a paladin riding Clifford the Big Red Dog into combat, lol? I prefer an extreamly large German Shepard or is there no distinction between breeds of a Great Hound you think? To me, the term Great Hound resonates this image. 
 
  
















Though I'd much rather prefer something like this



or 


     

Oh I agree.

Only "hound" is already statted in the Druid section - where they encompass anything from coyote to dog to wolf. And hounds are used for hunting.

But yeah, amp up the cool-factor.
Nice idea.  I like the warden "Green Knight" idea in the packet, but I think there is room for (and even a need for) a Grey Knight as well.

For a mount, I'm envisioning something like a giant war mastiff more than a dire wolf.  Wolves are symbols of the wild, whereas dogs/hounds are their opposite number, symbols of order and civilization, embodying loyalty and obedience but also strength.  The stats could be similar (even the same) as a dire wolf, but I think defining it as a "hound" is significant, if only from a flavor standpoint.

"I want 'punch magic in the face' to be a maneuver." -- wrecan

Nice idea.  I like the warden "Green Knight" idea in the packet, but I think there is room for (and even a need for) a Grey Knight as well.



Thanks. I don't really have anything against the Green Knight and think he fills a specific niche though the Warden name is a bit.....well Odd if you ask me. But that's neither here nor there. 


For a mount, I'm envisioning something like a giant war mastiff more than a dire wolf.  Wolves are symbols of the wild, whereas dogs/hounds are their opposite number, symbols of order and civilization, embodying loyalty and obedience but also strength.  The stats could be similar (even the same) as a dire wolf, but I think defining it as a "hound" is significant, if only from a flavor standpoint.



I like the idea of keeping the stats relatively close, though a Special Mount is going to have it's stats raised a bit and probably given something like Magical Resistance and some Mobility ability. I realize that a Wolf is very primal and wild, so it's not a good representation of what a Justicar might use to carry himself into battle. I like the idea of a large Mastiff or perhaps Rotweiler. Is there any way to distinguish the difference between a Giant German Shepard-style dog and that of a Dire Wolf? Or it could be more vague and just have Dire/Giant Hound and leave the specifics and imagry up to the individual player.
I like the idea of keeping the stats relatively close, though a Special Mount is going to have it's stats raised a bit and probably given something like Magical Resistance and some Mobility ability. I realize that a Wolf is very primal and wild, so it's not a good representation of what a Justicar might use to carry himself into battle. I like the idea of a large Mastiff or perhaps Rotweiler. Is there any way to distinguish the difference between a Giant German Shepard-style dog and that of a Dire Wolf? Or it could be more vague and just have Dire/Giant Hound and leave the specifics and imagry up to the individual player.

Just modify the Worg sidebar to:

Variant: Great Hound


Great Hounds are Lawful Neutral dire wolves with exeptional intelligence (INT 7-9). Thay can understand Common and their Paladin's (Justicar's) native language; and, they can communicate with their Paladin (Justicar) reliably, through some form of bark and/or paw signaling.

You could go as far as allowing them to speak (or use telepathy), if you so desire.

EDIT: Although, technically, the German Shephard is not a hound dog; it is a herding dog. Mastiffs are the base group that includes hounds though; so perhaps a Large sized mastiff or bull-mastiff would be a better imagery.

Gotta wonder why this option wasn't in the playtest.  The justicar-style character that only cares about law and order and will even puruse questionable acts to maintain it, is such an iconic character archetype.  

Almost every fantasy setting has a deity and a major organization/insitution like this.  In any setting with a single dominant deity/religion/government, this pretty much IS the standard. The majority of LG Paladin characters that I've seen fall did so because the player was going in this direction.

   If there is to be a Paladin class, it needs this option alongside anything else.  It should have been introduced before the Blackgaurd and definately before the Warden.
I definitely like the idea of a mount that has some sort of tracking ability, but agree that wolves read as a little too nature-y and large dogs read as a little too silly. (The archetype is, I think, very urban and not at all whimsical.)

One sort of extreme might be to invent a new creature based on the Zelekhut - fully equine rather than centauroid, wingless and probably less mechanical-looking, but drawing from the same well and thematically related to Zelekhuts. Zelekhuts have the right thematics - they're about hunting down people who would otherwise escape justice - and they're horselike. Perhaps you could call the new creature the beast that inspired the construction of Zelekhuts in the first place.
Dwarves invented beer so they could toast to their axes. Dwarves invented axes to kill people and take their beer. Swanmay Syndrome: Despite the percentages given in the Monster Manual, in reality 100% of groups of swans contain a Swanmay, because otherwise the DM would not have put any swans in the game.
  Why not just give the Justicar a Warhorse?  The Cavalier gets a Celestial Charger and the Blackguard gets a Bound Nightmare.
For some reason this discussion made me think of something like the Jim Butcher's depiction of the Erl King. Maybe the Justicar could ride a spirit Horse. The image of a paladin riding a ghostly dark horse that manifest hunting spirits that join him on his hunt sounds kind of awesome.

Cavalier = Celestial charger; Justicar = Spirit Steed; Blackguard = Nightmare. 

Reality Refracted: Social Contracts

My blog of Random Stuff 

Dreaming the Impossible Dream
Imagine a world where the first-time D&D player rolls stats, picks a race, picks a class, picks an alignment, and buys gear to create a character. Imagine if an experienced player, maybe the person helping our theoretical player learn the ropes, could also make a character by rolling ability scores and picking a race, class, feat, skills, class features, spells or powers, and so on. Those two players used different paths to build characters, but the system design allows them to play at the same table. -Mearl

"It is a general popular error to suppose the loudest complainers for the publick to be the most anxious for its welfare." - Edmund Burke

Back to Product and General D&D Discussions -- because the mobile site is bad. (Fixed!)

Hey all,

Well I'm not enamored of the paladin so far. I think it has a lot of sameness to the Cleric and there isn't much that distinguishes itself from the Cleric. That being said, I still get the creative jucies flowing from time to time and when I read the Write-UP of the Warden, I liked what I saw but didn't think the idea of a LG or LN alignment fit the concept. That, to me, just isn't how a Warden operates. So I created my own LN variant that strives to seek order between both Cavalier (LG) and Blackguard/Anti-Paladin (LE). Thus, the Justicar or Gray Guard / Gray Knight is born. Obviously the concept already exists and has been done before in previous editions and I think that the LN alignment works well for its intended purpose. I'll post my option first then go into the reason of how and why I came up with it.


Oath of the Justicar


Sometimes referred to as the Gray Knight or Gray Guard, a Justicar is the embodiment of law and order. They are not swayed by the moral principles of what society deems right or wrong as there is only law and people of both good and evil can break it. Justicars are the arbiters of edicts between the people and the bureaucracy and strive to maintain order in a chaotic world.  



Alignment (Optional): You must be lawful neutral.
Channel Divinity: You gain the Brand of Justice (see below), Divine Smite, and Turn Undead options.
Justicar Spells: Add the following spells to your spell list.

Spell
Level              Domain Spell
1                      Cause Fear
2                      Hold Person
3                      Speak with Dead
4                      Freedom of Movement
5                      True Seeing


Brand of Justice
When you hit a creature with a melee attack using a weapon with which you have proficiency, you can expend the use of your Channel Divinity to brand your enemies. When you do, each creature you choose within 10 ft. of you must make a Wisdom saving throw (DC equals your spell save DC). Creatures that fail the save only deal half damage with any successful weapon-based attack they make. In addition, they cannot move more than 10 ft. away from you for 1 minute. On its turn a branded creature can use its action to make a Wisdom check (DC equals your spell save DC) to end the effects.  

Ok, so first the name. The term Justicar is the arbiter of Law. The enforcer of order. They strive to maintain balance and uphold the peace. They're gray because their not shining paragons of virtue such as the White Knight and they're not ruthless tyrants like the Black Knight. They often encompass both to maintain a strong sense of authority and power. 

Second, the alignment restriction. Anyone who's seen me post on the Paladin threads knows I'm against restrictions almost instantly. This is why I put the restriction (Optional) there. Its there for Players and DM to discuss how strong of an option is should be or be in the game in the first place.

Third, Channel Divinity Options. I figured Divine Smite was a good option because Justicars often have to dole out justice and fight, thus smites are often invoked. Also, many undead are against the natural order of things and as such, Turn Undead is a better solution to an unruly creature. Third, I created myself because I wasn't thrilled with the other two options.

Fourth, Domain Spells. 1st level is Cause Fear and I chose this because a Justicar should be making law-breakes quiver with fear of retribution and punishment. It's a good way to make criminals wet themselves. 2nd level is Hold Person and I chose this because there are times when Criminal will attempt to escape. This spell helps hold them in place for manticles or swift justic (ie, Execution). 3rd level is Speak with Dead. I chose this because often times Justicars are local law enforcement and assigned cases that involve victims. Speaking with these dead souls helps solve their crimes and bring those people to justice. 4th level is Freedom of Movement. I chose this because Criminal are crafty and they might want to make their escape better (or just outright stop a Justiar) by placing spells or hampering their movement. This spell helps allow a chase to continue. 5th level is True Seeing and I chose this because the guilty should not be able to hide. Plus it helps weed out those who might not appear who they are and help with crime scenes.


Well there ya go. I'm sure I'll get people who'll shoot these options full of holes but thats OK. I like constructive criticism. I like talking about how I an make this option better. So feel free to discuss and dismantle the Gray Knight and let me know if you like it, hate it, or even if you just feel "Meh" about it. But I do ask that any criticism is also followed by a suggestion to make it better. 

Thanks!            




Awesome! I am probably going to allow use of this if I ever get a player interested in the Paladin. 

Are you planning on drafting any other homebrew oaths? I would really like to see a Knight in Sour Armor trope version (Maybe called Templar), and a lets adventure and kill evil cuz its fun version (which I would have called Cavalier... Not particularly Paladin-esque in flavor but Next has no other mounted combatant so I think it belongs there more so than anywhere else right now). 


Awesome! I am probably going to allow use of this if I ever get a player interested in the Paladin. 

Are you planning on drafting any other homebrew oaths? I would really like to see a Knight in Sour Armor trope version (Maybe called Templar), and a lets adventure and kill evil cuz its fun version (which I would have called Cavalier... Not particularly Paladin-esque in flavor but Next has no other mounted combatant so I think it belongs there more so than anywhere else right now). 



I could see a Cavalier as a paladin of a love goddess think courtly love or D'artagnian in the 3 musketeers or of the god of aristocracy, it would be fun to play.



Awesome! I am probably going to allow use of this if I ever get a player interested in the Paladin. 

Are you planning on drafting any other homebrew oaths? I would really like to see a Knight in Sour Armor trope version (Maybe called Templar), and a lets adventure and kill evil cuz its fun version (which I would have called Cavalier... Not particularly Paladin-esque in flavor but Next has no other mounted combatant so I think it belongs there more so than anywhere else right now). 



I could see a Cavalier as a paladin of a love goddess think courtly love or D'artagnian in the 3 musketeers or of the god of aristocracy, it would be fun to play.




Agreed! Thats great flavor and I hope I get a chance to use it.
Thanks for the responses, all of which are interesting suggestions. I currently hadn't planned on creating more Oaths but I'm not opposed to creating more. As for the mount, we have quite a few ideas floating around

1. Hound/Riding Dog 
2. Warhorse
3. Zelekhut (of a equine form)
4. Phantom/Spirit Steed
5. I also like the idea of a Bulette (it would just look cool, lacks a bit of reasoning though).

What I think it comes down to is what helps fuel the iconic Gray Knght image (reasonably any mount can do I suppose) but also has some reasoning as to why a Justicar would choose that over a Celestial Charger or Nightmare? I like the idea of it being the only option that has a flying mount, but that poses problems of balance (or does it?).    
          
Thanks for the responses, all of which are interesting suggestions. I currently hadn't planned on creating more Oaths but I'm not opposed to creating more. As for the mount, we have quite a few ideas floating around

1. Hound/Riding Dog 
2. Warhorse
3. Zelekhut (of a equine form)
4. Phantom/Spirit Steed
5. I also like the idea of a Bulette (it would just look cool, lacks a bit of reasoning though).

What I think it comes down to is what helps fuel the iconic Gray Knght image (reasonably any mount can do I suppose) but also has some reasoning as to why a Justicar would choose that over a Celestial Charger or Nightmare? I like the idea of it being the only option that has a flying mount, but that poses problems of balance (or does it?).    
          


It going to sound weird, but its two unrealated things. One is the Great Hunt lead by the Erl King in Dresdan Novels. Basically he is the leader of the great hunt and the reason for the hunt is for the joy of the hunt. They would be aggressively perserve the balance between good and evil and answer the call of the wild (what amounts to a hunting licences to restore the balance.) So they would be different from warden, because warden protect the natural world from unatural corruption, where as Justicar would peserve the natural balance of the natural world.
 

Reality Refracted: Social Contracts

My blog of Random Stuff 

Dreaming the Impossible Dream
Imagine a world where the first-time D&D player rolls stats, picks a race, picks a class, picks an alignment, and buys gear to create a character. Imagine if an experienced player, maybe the person helping our theoretical player learn the ropes, could also make a character by rolling ability scores and picking a race, class, feat, skills, class features, spells or powers, and so on. Those two players used different paths to build characters, but the system design allows them to play at the same table. -Mearl

"It is a general popular error to suppose the loudest complainers for the publick to be the most anxious for its welfare." - Edmund Burke

Back to Product and General D&D Discussions -- because the mobile site is bad. (Fixed!)

What I think it comes down to is what helps fuel the iconic Gray Knght image (reasonably any mount can do I suppose) but also has some reasoning as to why a Justicar would choose that over a Celestial Charger or Nightmare? I like the idea of it being the only option that has a flying mount, but that poses problems of balance (or does it?).

I find a dog/hound to be the most thematically appropriate.  A hound is loyal and obedient, embodying the ideals of law and order, and pursues its quarry with single-minded purpose.  It really seems like the most solid candidate.

Plus I like the image of a Grey Knight mounted on the back of giant, grey war mastiff.

"I want 'punch magic in the face' to be a maneuver." -- wrecan

Ok, I'm writing up stats for the Great Hound mount and probably one for a Phantom Steed as well (who doesn't like options?). For the Great Hound, I need a specific movement ability that's unique. For example, the Celestial Charger can run across water, the Summer Stag can double their jump distance, and the Nightmare can ignore difficult terrain. What would be a special mode of movement for the Great Hound?

For the Phantom Steed, I'm thinking of something similiar to the Nightmare, that he ignores difficult terrain OR maybe he can air walk, but only a few feet off the ground. I'll also be changing one of his Action-based attacks, something like Phantasmal Mist or Cold or something.  
Ok, I'm writing up stats for the Great Hound mount and probably one for a Phantom Steed as well (who doesn't like options?). For the Great Hound, I need a specific movement ability that's unique. For example, the Celestial Charger can run across water, the Summer Stag can double their jump distance, and the Nightmare can ignore difficult terrain. What would be a special mode of movement for the Great Hound?

For the Phantom Steed, I'm thinking of something similiar to the Nightmare, that he ignores difficult terrain OR maybe he can air walk, but only a few feet off the ground. I'll also be changing one of his Action-based attacks, something like Phantasmal Mist or Cold or something.  



Sounds cool. Something that would make it difficult to become invisible or hide would be cool. I was going to suggest something similiar to faerie fire, but that might be too strong.

Reality Refracted: Social Contracts

My blog of Random Stuff 

Dreaming the Impossible Dream
Imagine a world where the first-time D&D player rolls stats, picks a race, picks a class, picks an alignment, and buys gear to create a character. Imagine if an experienced player, maybe the person helping our theoretical player learn the ropes, could also make a character by rolling ability scores and picking a race, class, feat, skills, class features, spells or powers, and so on. Those two players used different paths to build characters, but the system design allows them to play at the same table. -Mearl

"It is a general popular error to suppose the loudest complainers for the publick to be the most anxious for its welfare." - Edmund Burke

Back to Product and General D&D Discussions -- because the mobile site is bad. (Fixed!)

What other Oaths could be realized for this version of the Paladin? What other alignments might be established and what sort of knights do they create?
What other Oaths could be realized for this version of the Paladin? What other alignments might be established and what sort of knights do they create?

I've been brainstorming a little bit and keeping track of other people's suggestions. I don't claim that this list is an "ALL OF THESE ARE NECESSARY" list. It's more of an "all of these might be fun and appropriate in certain settings" list. (Also, I know that some of the names have been used for non-paladinic things in the past. They're just names.)

"Dragon Knight" - servant or avatar of powerful draconic forces, this cavalier channels the power of his or her patrons, issuing gouts of flame or cracks of lightning from atop ever-more-impressive draconic steeds. Dragon Knights have no specific alignment tendency, but often have similar outlooks to their draconic patrons, if they serve specific beings. They are generally oathbound to advance their patrons' causes and to spread their glory and fame, as well as to hunt down their enemies -- which often includes coming face to face with dragons themselves. The Lawful Good cavaliers of the dragon god Bahamut are sometimes called Platinum Knights.

"Pale Knight" - The champions of gods of death and undeath or sometimes the living representatives of powerful liches or death knights, pale knights straddle the boundary between life and death. Most Pale Knights are enemies to the living, and they thus tend strongly towards an evil disposition. Neutral pale knights, able to maintain a grasp on morality despite their grim duties, are rare at best and often taken for evil regardless.

"Dwarven Defender" - While there are legends and rumors of honored humans or gnomes or even more improbable races being granted access to the low-level mysteries of their order, forge knights are overwhelmingly dwarven. Sharing an closer bond with their arms and armor than even other paladins, they have a unique connection with the dwarven gods and are oathbound to protect the interests of the dwarven people. While many dwarves are lawful, most Dwarven Defenders take this to an extreme.

"Kensei" - Most paladins are oathbound to advance or protect some cause or another. Kensei, however, lay down their lives in pursuit of pushing forward the limits of what it means to be skilled with the blade, a calling no less spiritual to them than the callings of other paladins. Not permitted to allow their discipline to lapse or their insights to be lost, this is one of the most demanding callings a warrior can find himself in. While unknowing observers might initially mistake them for nothing more than exquisitely skilled warriors, their spiritual dedication to their own sort of cause is sufficient that they are able to transcend the physical.

"Crimson Knight" - While many blackguards and even some pale knights are able to maintain a hold on neutrality despite their generally dark purposes, non-evil representatives among the numerous leagues of paladins devoted to devilish or demonic powers are all but unheard of, and those that claim to be trustworthy in spite of their affiliations are nearly always merely concealing their true intents. While most of the world is content to label all such avatars of evil "crimson knights" with little regard for who they serve, a crimson knight has few enemies more hated than a paladin in the service of the forces she opposes in the blood war.

"Beast Walker" - If Wardens are the solid oak, standing strong against threats to wild places, beast walkers are the fangs and teeth of the wild, exacting bloody vengeance on despoilers. Able to take on aspects of the wild to increase their physical might, beast walkers are rightly feared by those who run afoul of the aspects of the wild they are oathbound to protect.

"Liberator" - Where cavaliers are usually seen as upholders of goodness and righteousness, liberators see them as well-meaning but ultimately tools of the status quo. Running in much looser circles than most paladins in order to avoid detection, Liberators break shackles and loose bonds in their fight against tyranny - though they're more likely than most to consider even relatively benevolent monarchs tyrannical. Accountable only to the gods of freedom they usually serve or to their intentionally unstructured orders, liberators are usually chaotic good, but are sometimes neutral good or chaotic neutral.

"Tomebearer" - Gods of knowledge and magic and other major powers concerned with such things typically call upon powerful spellcasters when they need mortal champions, but being a god of knowledge means having  knowledge of the value of a strong arm and a steel blade. Tomeguards are usually oathbound to protect knowledge from being lost and to seek out new sources of it, and are empowered with the might to make that happen. Their fierce devotion, keen minds and strength in the saddle make them fearsome foes to those who would seek to conceal knowledge.

"Expurgitor" - Where tomebearers seek out new knowledge and seek to prevent any knowledge from being lost, these wary souls know that some knowledge is simply too dangerous to exist. They can be found guarding chambers of forbidden grimoires or out in the field confiscating or destroying bits of evidence that might lead to seals being broken and horrors being released. Many bear personally the scars of magics too dark for the material plane to bear, and they are equipped to deal with the mad arcanists typically after such things and the aberrations they call forth. They are bound not only to destroy secrets too dangerous for this world, but to keep themselves on a focused and disciplined path lest they fall into the temptation to make use of such vile magics themselves.
Dwarves invented beer so they could toast to their axes. Dwarves invented axes to kill people and take their beer. Swanmay Syndrome: Despite the percentages given in the Monster Manual, in reality 100% of groups of swans contain a Swanmay, because otherwise the DM would not have put any swans in the game.
Nice!
Good ideas there, Lesp


What would be a special mode of movement for the Great Hound?

The only thing I can think of is immunity to opportunity attacks, or else opportunity attacks against the Great Hound have disadvantage.

"I want 'punch magic in the face' to be a maneuver." -- wrecan

Good ideas there, Lesp


What would be a special mode of movement for the Great Hound?

The only thing I can think of is immunity to opportunity attacks, or else opportunity attacks against the Great Hound have disadvantage.




Those are cool ideas for the Phantom Steed I'm creating. Thanks!
I like this. 
I like the hound.  It fits in with the Justicar 'sniffing out' the truth.
I feel like Zone of Truth would be a perfect domain spell.
What other Oaths could be realized for this version of the Paladin? What other alignments might be established and what sort of knights do they create?

I've been brainstorming a little bit and keeping track of other people's suggestions. I don't claim that this list is an "ALL OF THESE ARE NECESSARY" list. It's more of an "all of these might be fun and appropriate in certain settings" list. (Also, I know that some of the names have been used for non-paladinic things in the past. They're just names.)

"Dragon Knight" - servant or avatar of powerful draconic forces, this cavalier channels the power of his or her patrons, issuing gouts of flame or cracks of lightning from atop ever-more-impressive draconic steeds. Dragon Knights have no specific alignment tendency, but often have similar outlooks to their draconic patrons, if they serve specific beings. They are generally oathbound to advance their patrons' causes and to spread their glory and fame, as well as to hunt down their enemies -- which often includes coming face to face with dragons themselves. The Lawful Good cavaliers of the dragon god Bahamut are sometimes called Platinum Knights.

"Pale Knight" - The champions of gods of death and undeath or sometimes the living representatives of powerful liches or death knights, pale knights straddle the boundary between life and death. Most Pale Knights are enemies to the living, and they thus tend strongly towards an evil disposition. Neutral pale knights, able to maintain a grasp on morality despite their grim duties, are rare at best and often taken for evil regardless.

"Dwarven Defender" - While there are legends and rumors of honored humans or gnomes or even more improbable races being granted access to the low-level mysteries of their order, forge knights are overwhelmingly dwarven. Sharing an closer bond with their arms and armor than even other paladins, they have a unique connection with the dwarven gods and are oathbound to protect the interests of the dwarven people. While many dwarves are lawful, most Dwarven Defenders take this to an extreme.

"Kensei" - Most paladins are oathbound to advance or protect some cause or another. Kensei, however, lay down their lives in pursuit of pushing forward the limits of what it means to be skilled with the blade, a calling no less spiritual to them than the callings of other paladins. Not permitted to allow their discipline to lapse or their insights to be lost, this is one of the most demanding callings a warrior can find himself in. While unknowing observers might initially mistake them for nothing more than exquisitely skilled warriors, their spiritual dedication to their own sort of cause is sufficient that they are able to transcend the physical.

"Crimson Knight" - While many blackguards and even some pale knights are able to maintain a hold on neutrality despite their generally dark purposes, non-evil representatives among the numerous leagues of paladins devoted to devilish or demonic powers are all but unheard of, and those that claim to be trustworthy in spite of their affiliations are nearly always merely concealing their true intents. While most of the world is content to label all such avatars of evil "crimson knights" with little regard for who they serve, a crimson knight has few enemies more hated than a paladin in the service of the forces she opposes in the blood war.

"Beast Walker" - If Wardens are the solid oak, standing strong against threats to wild places, beast walkers are the fangs and teeth of the wild, exacting bloody vengeance on despoilers. Able to take on aspects of the wild to increase their physical might, beast walkers are rightly feared by those who run afoul of the aspects of the wild they are oathbound to protect.

"Liberator" - Where cavaliers are usually seen as upholders of goodness and righteousness, liberators see them as well-meaning but ultimately tools of the status quo. Running in much looser circles than most paladins in order to avoid detection, Liberators break shackles and loose bonds in their fight against tyranny - though they're more likely than most to consider even relatively benevolent monarchs tyrannical. Accountable only to the gods of freedom they usually serve or to their intentionally unstructured orders, liberators are usually chaotic good, but are sometimes neutral good or chaotic neutral.

"Tomebearer" - Gods of knowledge and magic and other major powers concerned with such things typically call upon powerful spellcasters when they need mortal champions, but being a god of knowledge means having  knowledge of the value of a strong arm and a steel blade. Tomeguards are usually oathbound to protect knowledge from being lost and to seek out new sources of it, and are empowered with the might to make that happen. Their fierce devotion, keen minds and strength in the saddle make them fearsome foes to those who would seek to conceal knowledge.

"Expurgitor" - Where tomebearers seek out new knowledge and seek to prevent any knowledge from being lost, these wary souls know that some knowledge is simply too dangerous to exist. They can be found guarding chambers of forbidden grimoires or out in the field confiscating or destroying bits of evidence that might lead to seals being broken and horrors being released. Many bear personally the scars of magics too dark for the material plane to bear, and they are equipped to deal with the mad arcanists typically after such things and the aberrations they call forth. They are bound not only to destroy secrets too dangerous for this world, but to keep themselves on a focused and disciplined path lest they fall into the temptation to make use of such vile magics themselves.



Now we're well on our way to creating an entire Paladin module with any number of Oaths and subclasses.  This is kind of what I was talking about earlier.

I like this. 
I like the hound.  It fits in with the Justicar 'sniffing out' the truth.
I feel like Zone of Truth would be a perfect domain spell.



Thanks! I had some concerns about that Special Mount but I think the big dog works well for the whole Police Thing they have going on. As for the Zone of Truth spell, I didn't make it a Domain spell becuase all Paladin's have access to that spell at 2nd level.

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