More Natural Healing WITHOUT Rests please!

Anyone else try the simple no-short-or-long rests natural healing rule from Mearls

What do you think?

You heal naturally at the rate of level x hours - that's it! 

No rests
, similar to the last optional rule in the packets (the one with the bloodied value rules).


We've played it a couple of times, and I'm liking it.  Much less math, zero die rolling.  Requires a few tweaks to some feats and the healer's kit to work with hourly naturally healing, but otherwise I really like it as a balanced, story-friendly, simple way to naturally heal - either when truly needed or when you sleep for the night.

There are no weird immersion-breaking 5-min or 10-min pauses (short rests) after every single fight.  They worry less about wounds and maxing out every second of the day, and just keep adventuring.  Instead, on average, like in books or movies, the action gets moving again a lot more quickly. 

Honestly, the more natural healing options that don't include short rests (wretched things! hehe), the better! 


LEONINE ROAR : Amp Up Your D&D Game : Visit my D&D blog :: FASTER COMBAT : Crush Your Combat Grind

I could work with that, however I don't mind the short rest either.
We tried it, lead to mild irritation on the part of the higher HP PCs, especially the higher Con PCs that they were punished for beign more robust/healthier.

Typical complaint regarding no proportional healing.

That aside, it was a generally good compromise.
We tinkered with the idea of doubling the rate if you are actually resting. 
Other tinkers were Con mod added to the amount healed per hour, or making the amount levx1 for d4 HD classes, levx2 for d6 or d8, and levx3 for d10 or d12. 

However, the "rest" system is not my favourite. 
I have an answer for you, it may even be the truth.
We used HD + CON during short rests and by the final battle every player was out of HD! Yes they went into the fight with most of their HP but knew they had no other resources after this. I liked the tension it created.
Another thing I allowed was 'second wind', during combat you can take an action to recover one HD + CON. Came in handy for them. I also let the bad guy leaders do this as well! 

Disclaimer: Wizards of the Coast is not responsible for the consequences of any failed saving throw, including but not limited to petrification, poison, death magic, dragon breath, spells, or vorpal sword-related decapitations.

elec, if you try ou the simple hourly natural healing rule, let me know!  I know I and other gamers in this thread would love to hear more about about how well it's actually working for other playgroups.

Verdegris
, yeah, you're right - our barbarian powergamer wasn't a huge fan either!  But that was only after one particularly tough fight.  I mean, it's an advantage having such a huge reserve of hit points anyway, regardless of natural healing, right?  I did finally modify the Durable and Resilent feats, plus the Healer's Kit to work with the hourly healing - but that's a new development that we're about to test this Saturday afternoon.  We'll see how it goes!

And yeah, I'm not big on the rest rules in general - honestly, I love the simplicity of 2e natural healing the more I look at it, like I talk about in D&D Next Healing: Seek the Holy Grail on my D&D blog.

Strider, right on with the additional dramatic tension it creates!  For some reason, some players think slower or less natural healing options means automatic death.  What it really means is more dramatic tension and a bit more gritty realism, without it being a paralyzing amout of realism.  I don't miss the second wind though, for the same reasons I don't miss the short rest - a little too gamey for me.  But... I'd at least consider a dramatic, easy to use second wind option, as it can be flavorful without being jarring (unlike a 5 or 10 minute short rest after every fight or nick).  Thanks for the second wind idea - might just try out yours or one like it.

LEONINE ROAR : Amp Up Your D&D Game : Visit my D&D blog :: FASTER COMBAT : Crush Your Combat Grind

Having High Hp is a bonus in and of itself. 
I tend to agree with the complaint about lack of proportional healing when we get to long term recovery, short term mundane, not so much.

 My biggest problem with the pre-WotC system was the habit of leaving characters on injured reserve for a longer as their max hp went up. Mind you, the taper off of hp gain helped to keep it undr control a bit.

To note, I am of the abstract HP persuasion, in that I prefer Hit Points as Morale, Stamina, Luck, Vigor and Blood Volume, rather than pure health.
That having been said, this is a prime topic for customization, especially as it can be a contentious subject.

I definately agree that Hit Point Recovery should be dramatic.
Regardless of whether it is health or morale, if it doesn't have a cinematic potential, I don't want it cluttering up my combat rounds. 
Healing (restoring lost limbs, removing crippling or debilitating effects) should also be dramatic, and I often prefer it to be the subject of a ritual or quest itself, unless miracles that can weigh in change that (iow, Potent Clerical mysticism)  
I have an answer for you, it may even be the truth.

It feels a bit too much like regeneration for me. Short rests suit my DM style better but I like that we've got all these different options for health and recovery.


It's pretty obvious that they understand that it's a battleground issue and they're trying their best to provide us with so many options that we don't blink when we encounter a new way to deal with it.

You could always just drink a Tall Potion of Shut Th...at Wound Up.

 

I just said something and you just read it. Sorry about that.

How does a five minute rest actually affect RL play time? Or 'get in the way of the action'?

"In the game there is magic" - Orethalion

 

Only got words in my copy.

 

Philosopher Gamer

Could try what one of my DM's did in the past (it was house ruled in when caster types weren't at the table but eventually turned into an all-the-time houserule).  He had an egg timer he'd flip over everytime it ran out. I think it was 20 minutes (so it was a true egg timer) and then he'd roll 1d4. Everyone could take the value and add their Con modifier. This "tick" could happen anytime. While in combat, sleeping, drinking ale, running from the guards, or even while scaring donkeys (we had a elf in our group that would make other animal sounds that would scare our damn donkey away from camp).

This makes for quite an absctraction from what grid-like players may want but was very flowing to our style of game play.

Edit: forgot the most important part. We fully threw out all other types of natural healing, and this did the job instead, quit-well. The DM would take away the view of the timer though sometimes during battle. *I* sometimes, as well some others, would *time* our actions. =) In the end we were a loosly-based mechanic type of group and more on the RP-side of things. Sometimes half our battles were without dice. Can you imagine!?! lol

 

I just said something and you just read it. Sorry about that.

You can simply speed up or slow down healing. If your group lacks a cleric and you prefer lots of combat, you can allow healing at 5-minute intervals. For a more lethal campaign, change the healing rate to 4 or 8 hours. By changing one factor, you can make a significant change to the tone and feel of your game.

And this line can also be aplied to other things then resting and HP.
For example you could have a game where a caster can re gains spell slots based on 5 minute intervals.
5 minutes for a 1st level slot
20 minutes for a 4th level slot.  
Honestly though... why does there have to be any sort of natural healing throughout the day? Why can't you just naturally heal from sleep?

I understand this concept comes from 4Es Healing Surges... but that doesn't necesarily make it an something that has to be present. We managed fine in the older editions with relying on the cleric, potions, scrolls and herbs.

I rather they just strip martial and natural healing period (other then from sleep) from the core, and leave it all in a module.
I would rather strip clerics from the game... they have almost no precident in myth and legend or literature.
  Creative Character Build Collection and The Magic of King's and Heros  also Can Martial Characters Fly? 

Improvisation in 4e: Fave 4E Improvisations - also Wrecans Guides to improvisation beyond page 42
The Non-combatant Adventurer (aka Princess build Warlord or LazyLord)
Reality is unrealistic - and even monkeys protest unfairness
Reflavoring the Fighter : The Wizard : The Swordmage - Creative Character Collection: Bloodwright (Darksun Character) 

At full hit points and still wounded to incapacitation? you are playing 1e.
By virtue of being a player your characters are the protagonists in a heroic fantasy game even at level one
"Wizards and Warriors need abilities with explicit effects for opposite reasons. With the wizard its because you need to create artificial limits on them, they have no natural ones and for the Warrior you need to grant permission to do awesome."

 

I rather they just strip martial and natural healing period (other then from sleep) from the core, and leave it all in a module.



As long as Clerics and magical healing are also taken out of core and put in a module, sure, I can egt behind that.
Non magical fast healing...? What is this... I don't even... Personally in my play groups this will never happen. You want healing and have no Cure Spells? Well UMD and get some cure wands.
Photobucket
wands and potions dropped like video games or cheap as dirt ... yeh that happens all the time in the fiction  ...  
  Creative Character Build Collection and The Magic of King's and Heros  also Can Martial Characters Fly? 

Improvisation in 4e: Fave 4E Improvisations - also Wrecans Guides to improvisation beyond page 42
The Non-combatant Adventurer (aka Princess build Warlord or LazyLord)
Reality is unrealistic - and even monkeys protest unfairness
Reflavoring the Fighter : The Wizard : The Swordmage - Creative Character Collection: Bloodwright (Darksun Character) 

At full hit points and still wounded to incapacitation? you are playing 1e.
By virtue of being a player your characters are the protagonists in a heroic fantasy game even at level one
"Wizards and Warriors need abilities with explicit effects for opposite reasons. With the wizard its because you need to create artificial limits on them, they have no natural ones and for the Warrior you need to grant permission to do awesome."

 

wands and potions dropped like video games or cheap as dirt ... yeh that happens all the time in the fiction  ...  



I always have to wonder...where do all those random wild animals get Potions?
Honestly though... why does there have to be any sort of natural healing throughout the day? Why can't you just naturally heal from sleep?




Gwathir, honestly I feel that way too, and it's exactly what I talked about in D&D Next Healing: Seek the Holy Grail.  What you're suggesting is much closer to 2e natural healing. 

Like I explain in that article, I decided to tack on Mearls simple hourly healing rule to it to experiment with something that's more of a 2e-4e natural healing hybrid. 

But I definitely have returning to a more sleep-based 2e-style natural healing style on my list of options too.  (You're right that the expectation for some sort of faster natural healing is more of 4e holdover.)

For reference, here's 2e natural healing:



  • With no rest (fighting, casting) : 0HP/day

  • With rest (traveling allowed) but no help from a healer : 1HP/day

  • With rest (traveling allowed) and help from a healer : 2HP/day

  • With bed rest (no traveling) but no help from a healer : 3HP/day

  • With bed rest (no traveling) and help from a healer : 5HP/day

  • With bed rest (no traveling) and help from someone that is both a healer and an herbalist : 6HP/day


No sign of short rests anywhere!  Natural healing on a per-day basis only. 


Would make for a great natural healing option or module - or for some of us, simply a more believable or grittier standard of play!

LEONINE ROAR : Amp Up Your D&D Game : Visit my D&D blog :: FASTER COMBAT : Crush Your Combat Grind

I can't directly reply because I am on my phone but a cure light wounds wand is pretty easily obtainable at level one IIRC. It should cost over 300gp at most. I would have to double check the price but I don't have the PDF handy ATM.
Photobucket
how about:

normal activitiy: 0
long rest(night of sleep): 10% of max HP
long rest + healer: 20% of max HP
full bed rest(24hrs): 20% of max HP
full bed rest + healer: 40% of max HP

now with added version of 3.5e faster healing feat:

normal activity: 10% HP per 8 hrs
normal activity + healer: 10% HP per 8 hrs
long rest: 20% of max HP
long rest + healer: 40% of max HP
full bed rest: 40% of max HP
full bed rest + healer: 80% of max HP

and ofc drop healing dices.
I can't directly reply because I am on my phone but a cure light wounds wand is pretty easily obtainable at level one IIRC. It should cost over 300gp at most. I would have to double check the price but I don't have the PDF handy ATM.



The availability of a cure light wounds wand is dependant on the DM.       In many games, there are no magic shops.


Honestly though... why does there have to be any sort of natural healing throughout the day? Why can't you just naturally heal from sleep?




Gwathir, honestly I feel that way too, and it's exactly what I talked about in D&D Next Healing: Seek the Holy Grail.  What you're suggesting is much closer to 2e natural healing. 

Like I explain in that article, I decided to tack on Mearls simple hourly healing rule to it to experiment with something that's more of a 2e-4e natural healing hybrid. 

But I definitely have returning to a more sleep-based 2e-style natural healing style on my list of options too.  (You're right that the expectation for some sort of faster natural healing is more of 4e holdover.)

For reference, here's 2e natural healing:



  • With no rest (fighting, casting) : 0HP/day

  • With rest (traveling allowed) but no help from a healer : 1HP/day

  • With rest (traveling allowed) and help from a healer : 2HP/day

  • With bed rest (no traveling) but no help from a healer : 3HP/day

  • With bed rest (no traveling) and help from a healer : 5HP/day

  • With bed rest (no traveling) and help from someone that is both a healer and an herbalist : 6HP/day


No sign of short rests anywhere!  Natural healing on a per-day basis only. 


Would make for a great natural healing option or module - or for some of us, simply a more believable or grittier standard of play!




Those are the rules that I still use even when playing D&D Next.    Of course, I don't use hit dice either.   


Non magical fast healing...? What is this... I don't even... Personally in my play groups this will never happen. You want healing and have no Cure Spells? Well UMD and get some cure wands.



Everyone is the by-product of a forbidden troll/X  "romance".
Could try what one of my DM's did in the past (it was house ruled in when caster types weren't at the table but eventually turned into an all-the-time houserule).  He had an egg timer he'd flip over everytime it ran out. I think it was 20 minutes (so it was a true egg timer) and then he'd roll 1d4. Everyone could take the value and add their Con modifier. This "tick" could happen anytime. While in combat, sleeping, drinking ale, running from the guards, or even while scaring donkeys (we had a elf in our group that would make other animal sounds that would scare our damn donkey away from camp).

This makes for quite an absctraction from what grid-like players may want but was very flowing to our style of game play.

Edit: forgot the most important part. We fully threw out all other types of natural healing, and this did the job instead, quit-well. The DM would take away the view of the timer though sometimes during battle. *I* sometimes, as well some others, would *time* our actions. =) In the end we were a loosly-based mechanic type of group and more on the RP-side of things. Sometimes half our battles were without dice. Can you imagine!?! lol



I like the sound of this.  May try something like it with my group.
Honestly though... why does there have to be any sort of natural healing throughout the day? Why can't you just naturally heal from sleep?

I understand this concept comes from 4Es Healing Surges... but that doesn't necesarily make it an something that has to be present. We managed fine in the older editions with relying on the cleric, potions, scrolls and herbs.

I rather they just strip martial and natural healing period (other then from sleep) from the core, and leave it all in a module.


All healing recovers hit points, but not all hit point recovery is healing.

 As Hit Points represent more than just structural integrity, the methods of recovering them should be more than just medical or miraculous.

 In a module where Hit Points are only health and blood volume, limiting healing to a slow natural rate, possibly enhanced with medical care, and magic makes perfect sense. 

The crux is internal consistency.
When they throw out HP being luck, morale, stamina, and divine favour, then we can limit it's restoration to meds and miracles. However, until it is only Meat points, it is internally inconsistent to not allow morale, luck, and stamina consideratiosn to affect it.

I'm perfectly happy to accept a Health Point system, but it needs to be presented as such rather than as a Hit Point system.
I have an answer for you, it may even be the truth.
Honestly though... why does there have to be any sort of natural healing throughout the day? Why can't you just naturally heal from sleep?

I understand this concept comes from 4Es Healing Surges... but that doesn't necesarily make it an something that has to be present. We managed fine in the older editions with relying on the cleric, potions, scrolls and herbs.

I rather they just strip martial and natural healing period (other then from sleep) from the core, and leave it all in a module.



One of the mian reasons I loved that there was more natural healing was that it alouwed for more intresting adventures.

In ADnD 2nd edition when making adventures you always had to keep in account that a dungeon could only have a verly low number of encounters in it.
As people would run out of spells and HP pretty fast.

Or you had to resort to silly things like being able to set up a camp and sleep 8 hours in the middel of a monster infested dungeon.




 
Probably because AD&D play involved the players doing their own thing, rather than following a GM plot. Sure, finding a place to camp is a hurdle - and so are those monsters that missbehave and try to kill you. It's part of the idea of players dealing with hurdles - the monsters aren't just there for window dressing purposes.

Though having some mechanism tied to amounts of RL time spent gaming is a good idea.

"In the game there is magic" - Orethalion

 

Only got words in my copy.

 

Philosopher Gamer

Probably because AD&D play involved the players doing their own thing, rather than following a GM plot. Sure, finding a place to camp is a hurdle - and so are those monsters that missbehave and try to kill you. It's part of the idea of players dealing with hurdles - the monsters aren't just there for window dressing purposes.

Though having some mechanism tied to amounts of RL time spent gaming is a good idea.

This is a red herring. 4E was the first edition of DnD that incentivized players to seek out their own goals or miniplots via its quest xp mechanic. It has nothing to do with which rest mechanic you use.
Probably because AD&D play involved the players doing their own thing, rather than following a GM plot. Sure, finding a place to camp is a hurdle - and so are those monsters that missbehave and try to kill you. It's part of the idea of players dealing with hurdles - the monsters aren't just there for window dressing purposes.

Though having some mechanism tied to amounts of RL time spent gaming is a good idea.

This is a red herring. 4E was the first edition of DnD that incentivized players to seek out their own goals or miniplots via its quest xp mechanic. It has nothing to do with which rest mechanic you use.




Quest XP might motivate some players but it doesn't motivate characters.    In fact, it might even encourage metagaming.     There really is no need to inform the players of the quests they are on, let alone the xp value of each.



Probably because AD&D play involved the players doing their own thing, rather than following a GM plot. Sure, finding a place to camp is a hurdle - and so are those monsters that missbehave and try to kill you. It's part of the idea of players dealing with hurdles - the monsters aren't just there for window dressing purposes.

Though having some mechanism tied to amounts of RL time spent gaming is a good idea.

This is a red herring. 4E was the first edition of DnD that incentivized players to seek out their own goals or miniplots via its quest xp mechanic. It has nothing to do with which rest mechanic you use.




Quest XP might motivate some players but it doesn't motivate characters.    In fact, it might even encourage metagaming.     There really is no need to inform the players of the quests they are on, let alone the xp value of each.



Uhhh.... Ok? Annnnnd?

The criticism I addressed was that players (and by extension, their characters) are merely following the plot the DM is feeding to them instead of "doing their own thing". I responded that 4E is the only version of the game that features a reward cycle that incentivizes and therefore promotes players/PC "doing their own thing" (via quest xp).

It reminds me of the criticism that so-and-so edition of DnD isn't a roleplaying game, when absolutely no version of DnD has a reward mechanism for characterization, backstory, or adhering to character themes/virtues/qualities. You get the behavior you want in games with carrots, not sticks. DnD has no carrots for roleplaying (those of you have played games with roleplaying/narrating carrots know what I am talking about here).

Quite frankly,  your comments here seem irrelevant. 
Whether players follow the plot set forth by the DM, or go off and do their own thing (regardless of mechanical incentives), is an issue that depends more on the players than the system or edition. Some DMs consider a plot to be unjustified interference in the player's game, and some players consider an open sandbox to be bereft of meaning. Other views also exist.

The metagame is not the game.

Probably because AD&D play involved the players doing their own thing, rather than following a GM plot. Sure, finding a place to camp is a hurdle - and so are those monsters that missbehave and try to kill you. It's part of the idea of players dealing with hurdles - the monsters aren't just there for window dressing purposes.

Though having some mechanism tied to amounts of RL time spent gaming is a good idea.

This is a red herring. 4E was the first edition of DnD that incentivized players to seek out their own goals or miniplots via its quest xp mechanic. It has nothing to do with which rest mechanic you use.




Quest XP might motivate some players but it doesn't motivate characters.    In fact, it might even encourage metagaming.     There really is no need to inform the players of the quests they are on, let alone the xp value of each.



Uhhh.... Ok? Annnnnd?

The criticism I addressed was that players (and by extension, their characters) are merely following the plot the DM is feeding to them instead of "doing their own thing". I responded that 4E is the only version of the game that features a reward cycle that incentivizes and therefore promotes players/PC "doing their own thing" (via quest xp).

It reminds me of the criticism that so-and-so edition of DnD isn't a roleplaying game, when absolutely no version of DnD has a reward mechanism for characterization, backstory, or adhering to character themes/virtues/qualities. You get the behavior you want in games with carrots, not sticks. DnD has no carrots for roleplaying (those of you have played games with roleplaying/narrating carrots know what I am talking about here).

Quite frankly,  your comments here seem irrelevant. 



And your comments are just completely wrong!   D&D had carrots for roleplaying long before 4e.   

Your statement is uneducated.    

Here is a small table (one of many) from the 2e DMG that awarded xp for role playing.      Creating a backstory and adhering to a character theme is definitely part of "Role-plays his character well"   

Common individual Awards

























Player has a clever idea 
50-100 
Player has an idea that saves the party 
100-500 
Player role-plays his character well* 
100-200 
Player encourages others to participate 
100-200 
Defeating a creature in a single combat 
XP value/creature 




*This award can be greater if the player character sacrifices some game advantage to role-play his character. A noble fighter who refuses a substantial reward because it would not be in character qualifies.








Individual Awards have been bad since the xp tables were unified.  They weren't really all that good when the xp tables were all over the damn place either.

Here's why:


  • It's either blatant favoritism, or the appearance of blatant favoritism.

  • De-syncronizing the party makes encounter planning and balance largely impossible.

Probably because AD&D play involved the players doing their own thing, rather than following a GM plot. Sure, finding a place to camp is a hurdle - and so are those monsters that missbehave and try to kill you. It's part of the idea of players dealing with hurdles - the monsters aren't just there for window dressing purposes.

Though having some mechanism tied to amounts of RL time spent gaming is a good idea.

This is a red herring. 4E was the first edition of DnD that incentivized players to seek out their own goals or miniplots via its quest xp mechanic. It has nothing to do with which rest mechanic you use.




Quest XP might motivate some players but it doesn't motivate characters.    In fact, it might even encourage metagaming.     There really is no need to inform the players of the quests they are on, let alone the xp value of each.



Uhhh.... Ok? Annnnnd?

The criticism I addressed was that players (and by extension, their characters) are merely following the plot the DM is feeding to them instead of "doing their own thing". I responded that 4E is the only version of the game that features a reward cycle that incentivizes and therefore promotes players/PC "doing their own thing" (via quest xp).

It reminds me of the criticism that so-and-so edition of DnD isn't a roleplaying game, when absolutely no version of DnD has a reward mechanism for characterization, backstory, or adhering to character themes/virtues/qualities. You get the behavior you want in games with carrots, not sticks. DnD has no carrots for roleplaying (those of you have played games with roleplaying/narrating carrots know what I am talking about here).

Quite frankly,  your comments here seem irrelevant. 



And your comments are just completely wrong!   D&D had carrots for roleplaying long before 4e.   

Your statement is uneducated.    

Here is a small table (one of many) from the 2e DMG that awarded xp for role playing.      Creating a backstory and adhering to a character theme is definitely part of "Role-plays his character well"   

Common individual Awards

























Player has a clever idea 
50-100 
Player has an idea that saves the party 
100-500 
Player role-plays his character well* 
100-200 
Player encourages others to participate 
100-200 
Defeating a creature in a single combat 
XP value/creature 




*This award can be greater if the player character sacrifices some game advantage to role-play his character. A noble fighter who refuses a substantial reward because it would not be in character qualifies.








Yeahhhhhh.....

Those feel more like carrot shavings, honestly. I mean, they're better than nothing, I guess, but....

What I had in mind was something more like backgrounds and icon relationships in 13th Age, virtue and vices in World of Darkness, aspects and fate points in Dresden Files and Spirit of the Century, or honor in Legend of the Five Rings.

These mechanics put the details of your characters backstory, relationships, personality traits, and so on at the front and center of the game's psychological capital. DnD has never really done this, in large part because it has it began as a modified wargame. 
Whether players follow the plot set forth by the DM, or go off and do their own thing (regardless of mechanical incentives), is an issue that depends more on the players than the system or edition. Some DMs consider a plot to be unjustified interference in the player's game, and some players consider an open sandbox to be bereft of meaning. Other views also exist.

I've played in both wide-open 'sandbox' campaigns, and highly directed storytelling campaigns - they both work in virtually any system.  The only problem D&D runs into with 'sandboxing' is the 5MWD, and that problem was minimized in 4e, where everyone has dailies, so only encounter, not class, balance is impacted.  5e, so far, is planned to balance around an average adventuring 'day,' so will run into class balance issues if the pacing isn't at least somewhat directive.

Edit:  Hmmm... to be fair, there's a corresponding problem in 'railroad' games with predictable pacing:  the players start to figure out which encounter is the 'important' one, and dump all thier major resources on it.  The DM can start trying to bluff them out, but if the players got his number once, they'll do so again.  :shrug:

 

 

Oops, looks like this request tried to create an infinite loop. We do not allow such things here. We are a professional website!

Probably because AD&D play involved the players doing their own thing, rather than following a GM plot. Sure, finding a place to camp is a hurdle - and so are those monsters that missbehave and try to kill you. It's part of the idea of players dealing with hurdles - the monsters aren't just there for window dressing purposes.

Though having some mechanism tied to amounts of RL time spent gaming is a good idea.

This is a red herring. 4E was the first edition of DnD that incentivized players to seek out their own goals or miniplots via its quest xp mechanic. It has nothing to do with which rest mechanic you use.


I'll clarify - players doing their own thing in their pursuit of gold (which == XP) or treasure (which also == XP and increased power).

Finding a place to camp was one of the hurdles (along with monsters) in the way of that pursuit.

"In the game there is magic" - Orethalion

 

Only got words in my copy.

 

Philosopher Gamer

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