Divine Challenge and Lightning-Strike

7 posts / 0 new
Last post
Hi there

Last night something interesting popped up in our weekly dnd-session.

- Our Battlemind and Paladin/Hospitalier was attack by a close-blast 5. They were both adjacent to each other and to the enemy.
- The Paladin had his mark (Divine Challenge) on the enemy.
- Both were targeted by the blast and the Battlemind used Lighting Rush to jump infront of the attack. - - He redirected the attack successfully to himself (the Battlemind).
- Therefore, the Paladin claimed he was never targeted by the blast and could punish the enemy with his mark (Divine Challange).

So, what happens?

I know Lightning Rush is quite a "shady" power to begin with. But maybe someone has a good answer for this.

Thanks in advance,
Kees
 
Hi there

Last night something interesting popped up in our weekly dnd-session.

- Our Battlemind and Paladin/Hospitalier was attack by a close-blast 5. They were both adjacent to each other and to the enemy.
- The Paladin had his mark (Divine Challenge) on the enemy.
- Both were targeted by the blast and the Battlemind used Lighting Rush to jump infront of the attack. - - He redirected the attack successfully to himself (the Battlemind).
- Therefore, the Paladin claimed he was never targeted by the blast and could punish the enemy with his mark (Divine Challange).

So, what happens?



Your Paladin is exactly right:  The Battlemind used an interrupt and took the attack, and caused it to target himself and *not* target the Paladin.  Now the monster has made an attack that doesn't target the Paladin, which means the Paladin's mark kicks in (the attack takes -2 to hit) and the effect of Divine Challenge kicks in (the monster takes damage)

Not only is it a legit trick, it's good tactics.  The monk in one of my games uses a similar trick with Guardian's Counter:  he waits for someone to attack the Defender, then swaps himself in as the target instead.  Now the monster is violating the Mark and the Defender pounds it.


I know Lightning Rush is quite a "shady" power to begin with. But maybe someone has a good answer for this.
 



Not "shady".  Good.  It's a good power.  Especially in a team with a second Defender.
Confused about Stealth? Think "invisibility" means "take the mini off the board to make people guess?" You need to check out The Rules Of Hidden Club.
Damage types and resistances: A working house rule.
However, I believe you could use the argument that you get to attack the Battlemind twice with the blast.
Ours is a world where people don't know what they want, and are willing to go through hell to get it. -Don Marquis
However, I believe you could use the argument that you get to attack the Battlemind twice with the blast.



Absolutely!  The Battlemind was targeted by the original attack, and then he was targeted by it *again* because he took the Paladin's part of the attack.  The Battlemind totally gets hit twice.
Confused about Stealth? Think "invisibility" means "take the mini off the board to make people guess?" You need to check out The Rules Of Hidden Club.
Damage types and resistances: A working house rule.
Or missed twice!
Or missed twice!



Granted.  That could totally happen, especially with the Paladin's mark penalty.
Confused about Stealth? Think "invisibility" means "take the mini off the board to make people guess?" You need to check out The Rules Of Hidden Club.
Damage types and resistances: A working house rule.
Ah yes, thank you all for a good constructive answer!
We have a Talaric Ironjack Battlemind, so I, as DM, miss him a lot.