Sleypy Playtest Feedback-J Sicari DM

Jonathan was nice enough to DM a game for us that turned into a two session game. Props to him on that. Thanks man. I really enjoyed the roleplay elements and the added comic book references were really nice touch it made the setting that much more interesting.

We made great use of the backgrounds so I think that is both a nod to both the feature and Jonathan. The traits functions as a good built in story hook for a DM and the DM made excellent use of the feature. I would say that backgrounds are the highlight of session and the playtest for me. 

Combat was interest in that seeing some of the cool monster abilities for the first time that I hadn't encountered. Unfortunatly, felt like the monsters out shine the actual PCs. I hadn't played a rogue so I though I would try one out. I built an acrobat with slippery target (terrible choice) two weapon defense (good choice) and shift (okay choice). I became apparent right away the slippery target is a bad feature. In my initial reading I missed the range restrictions which makes an already situation ability all but unusable. Enemies want to suround and flank and slippery target only works if they bunch up in front of you so it doesn't function in a natural way. I think its probably one of those choices that probably gets better later on, but it reach requirements are just way to specific to be viable when compared to the other options. Shift was somewhat useful in getting me out of a bad situation were I was nearly surounded and could get to be better position between my allies.  

Combat overall was once I saw all the bad guys cool things the fights started to drag a bit, but cause I didn't have much going on but a melee and an rare reaction (4 through about 20-22 rounds of combat) only 1 of which actually did anything beneficial since only once did I stay up instead of going down anyway to a double attack. Combat rounds are faster and even with a little roleplayed conversations turns took a minute or less. Conversely, combat required more rounds since everything takes a single action and more rounds increased the number of reactions. The actually length of combat hasn't change, the pace has speed up slightly (was about 8-10 minute rounds with 5 PC) and the interesting choices seem to be lacking.

Overall, I'm particularly sold on backgrounds and how skills work.  I think they need to do something about Slippery Target it just sucks, it should work on any enemy engaged with the rogue. The pace of combat is faster which is a good thing, the length of combat does seem like it hasn't changed much. When there are constant filler type actions ( like drinking potions, every round reactions, etc) the pace is really just an illusion.  

Reality Refracted: Social Contracts

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Dreaming the Impossible Dream
Imagine a world where the first-time D&D player rolls stats, picks a race, picks a class, picks an alignment, and buys gear to create a character. Imagine if an experienced player, maybe the person helping our theoretical player learn the ropes, could also make a character by rolling ability scores and picking a race, class, feat, skills, class features, spells or powers, and so on. Those two players used different paths to build characters, but the system design allows them to play at the same table. -Mearl

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Thanks amigo, your always welcome at my table.
In what ways do you think the monsters specifically "out shine" the pc's? We have felt the exact opposite at both our tables. We feel the pc's have too many tools at their disposal and make combat feel underwhelming.
I am wondering if the rogue is designed for advanced play.  I still have yet to figure out my rogue.

"The Apollo moon landing is off topic for this thread and this forum. Let's get back on topic." Crazy Monkey

In what ways do you think the monsters specifically "out shine" the pc's? We have felt the exact opposite at both our tables. We feel the pc's have too many tools at their disposal and make combat feel underwhelming.



My thread here[community.wizards.com/go/thread/view/758....] may shed some light but I don't want to speak for him.
In what ways do you think the monsters specifically "out shine" the pc's? We have felt the exact opposite at both our tables. We feel the pc's have too many tools at their disposal and make combat feel underwhelming.


Sorry I took so long responding. What I meant was I found myself looking forward more to see what the new enemies we encountered did far more then I looked forward to my own turn. In part this is due to Jonathan doing a good job describing the creatures and their actions. And the rest to do with my character which I went on explained.

Looking at the PC's as a collective party it feels like the party has too many tools. However, me playing my character I had a few situation specific abilities that didn't really occur often until the final encounter. The NPCs seemed to have a number of abilities that got used more regularly and where more compelling.

Reality Refracted: Social Contracts

My blog of Random Stuff 

Dreaming the Impossible Dream
Imagine a world where the first-time D&D player rolls stats, picks a race, picks a class, picks an alignment, and buys gear to create a character. Imagine if an experienced player, maybe the person helping our theoretical player learn the ropes, could also make a character by rolling ability scores and picking a race, class, feat, skills, class features, spells or powers, and so on. Those two players used different paths to build characters, but the system design allows them to play at the same table. -Mearl

"It is a general popular error to suppose the loudest complainers for the publick to be the most anxious for its welfare." - Edmund Burke

Back to Product and General D&D Discussions -- because the mobile site is bad. (Fixed!)

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