Advice on incorporating "tray of sweetmeats" into Chaos campaign?

Wonder if I can get some advice? I'm GMing a D&D Next run thru caves of chaos this evening. I'm taking some treats with me to share w/the group (chocoloate covered macaroons), when I thought ... "hey, this might be cool to work into the session."

The idea being, at some point some npc serves up to the party said treats (yes, I realize choc covered macaroons are probably not right for the period, I could always call them "sweetmeats" ;) and as folk chow down, I feverishly start looking around and "making notes." I didn't think to actually do anything with it, but just thought it'd be a fun way to kinda muck with the party's heads ;)

But I'm having a tough time figuring how to work in some NPC arriving with a tray full of treats - appreciate if anyone has any ideas!
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my apologies for the mistake.
Magical macaroons... are like magical gingersnaps?

How does messing with your players' heads without actually doing anything with it make for a good game?

Personally, if my DM did this to me I wouldn't be likely to come back for another session because it's borderline creepy in the way it mixes real world and the game.  I advise against this.  If you want to do a situation where the PCs are eating and there's something suspicious going on, first of all, have a point to it which will eventually add to everyone's enjoyment and not just your own, and second of all, don't feed the players themselves while you're doing it - that's kinda icky and not cool. 

OD&D, 1E and 2E challenged the player. 3E challenged the character, not the player. Now 4E takes it a step further by challenging a GROUP OF PLAYERS to work together as a TEAM. That's why I love 4E.

"Your ability to summon a horde of celestial superbeings at will is making my ... BMX skills look a bit redundant."

"People treat their lack of imagination as if it's the measure of what's silly. Which is silly." - Noon

"Challenge" is overrated.  "Immersion" is usually just a more pretentious way of saying "having fun playing D&D."

"Falling down is how you grow.  Staying down is how you die.  It's not what happens to you, it's what you do after it happens.”


How does messing with your players' heads without actually doing anything with it make for a good game?

Personally, if my DM did this to me I wouldn't be likely to come back for another session because it's borderline creepy in the way it mixes real world and the game.  I advise against this.  If you want to do a situation where the PCs are eating and there's something suspicious going on, first of all, have a point to it which will eventually add to everyone's enjoyment and not just your own, and second of all, don't feed the players themselves while you're doing it - that's kinda icky and not cool. 



I agree completely. Having a DM do something like this is a quick way to drive players off. Some metagame stuff can be fun. I remember a story in a mag where a DM was using a ruleless magic ring that could obsorb other magic items and use their effects, but the ring was basically a phone that called a guy looking at a computer screen and was using cheat mode for the characters. This is something that I am considering copying into a game I run when I start another one. Although if you want to include them doing something I know their are some funny pranks with "magic" foods. Don't know how this would apply to other players but elemental spores was a common prank within many games I have played.
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