Counter Ambiguity

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Alright its time once and for all we straighten this mess out.

Counter (n): thing you place on permanents (or suspended cards) to keep track of something with

Counter (v): To take a spell from the stack and place it into its owner's graveyard. It does not resolve.

We really need two different words for these two completely different things, otherwise Ambiguity ensues

I propose Cancel. You know, that card that's been in just about every single set ever since it was first released despite seeing hardly any play anywhere. Im seriously beginning to think Wizards will do this very soon so we can have cancel in every set without actually having the damn card.
Alright its time once and for all we straighten this mess out.

Counter (n): thing you place on permanents (or suspended cards) to keep track of something with

Counter (v): To take a spell from the stack and place it into its owner's graveyard. It does not resolve.

We really need two different words for these two completely different things, otherwise Ambiguity ensues

I propose Cancel. You know, that card that's been in just about every single set ever since it was first released despite seeing hardly any play anywhere. Im seriously beginning to think Wizards will do this very soon so we can have cancel in every set without actually having the damn card.



Counterspell is the one that's been around since the very first set.  Cancel didn't show up until just a few years ago.
 
Are people really confused by this?  I've never seen a question about it.
 
It's a bit unfortunate to have the same word, especially when searching for text on some cards.

But I think it's not worth it to change two key words with so much historical baggage when there isn't a very good reason. ("coming into play" without being "played" was an issue.)
Alright its time once and for all we straighten this mess out.

Counter (n): thing you place on permanents (or suspended cards) to keep track of something with

Counter (v): To take a spell from the stack and place it into its owner's graveyard. It does not resolve.

We really need two different words for these two completely different things, otherwise Ambiguity ensues

I propose Cancel. You know, that card that's been in just about every single set ever since it was first released despite seeing hardly any play anywhere. Im seriously beginning to think Wizards will do this very soon so we can have cancel in every set without actually having the damn card.



This is a pretty liberal use of the word "mess."

I wouldn't expect this to happen. The multiple meanings of counter are pretty clear. 
I've been using the word "chip" for marker counters.
Chip is shorter which allows more to be fitted on a card.



 

applied fore a job at wizards 7-14-2014

hasbro didn't respond

 

Lestat the Musical: I want more
You've already made a thread about this.

While the two words do consist of the same sequence of letters, the context for the two is so different that it's extremely rare for actual confusion to arise from this supposed ambiguity.

You might as well say that we need to distinguish between "draw" and "draw", since otherwise people will think that Divine Intervention means "the game is putting a card from the top of your library into your hand" or that Concentrate means "cause three cards to end with neither player winning".
Has a player ever pulled out pencil and paper to make a sketch when asked to draw a card?

Play vs put into play was problematic, counter vs counter not so much

3DH4LIF3

you're lucky, guys.  here in Italy "draw (a card)"  also means "fishing" and "peach"  Embarassed


If I had to reinvent Magic today, I would use two different words for counter, like "cancel" and "marker".

many of the early card names were taken from RPG books (Fireball, Animate Dead, Wall of Ice) so back then it made perfect sense that spells were "countered" by a Counterspell, and not "stopped", "canceled", or whatever works better today.




You've already made a thread about this.

While the two words do consist of the same sequence of letters, the context for the two is so different that it's extremely rare for actual confusion to arise from this supposed ambiguity.

You might as well say that we need to distinguish between "draw" and "draw", since otherwise people will think that Divine Intervention means "the game is putting a card from the top of your library into your hand" or that Concentrate means "cause three cards to end with neither player winning".

Thanks, I wish I remembered making that thread before this one. Guess Ill have to delete this one now.