Creating new cleric - Channel Divinity and Ritual caster questions

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In preparation of a new DnD group I'm starting as a new player I thought I'd at least create a character to know what the players need to go though. I'll start out as the DM, but even the Player Manual is giving me headaches I've rolled a cleric, but here's two sections of rules I can't get to make sense:

Channel Divinity
There are multiple powers mentioned for cleric, some as cleric feature, some as feat (feature and feat, two different things right?). Do I get all of them and pick the one I want to use during the encounter or am I supposed to make a choice? There's Divine Fortune, Turn undead, and for example Kord's Favor

Ritual casting
The manual states I've mastered Gentle Repose, and I can choose one other level 1 ritual. The point is I haven't trained Arcana or Nature, making all level 1 rituals useless. Can and should I still pick one and have a use for it somehow, or isn't it even possible due to my choice of skills?

Throwing weapons
I've thrown in a tiny last minute question that I ran into: do throwing weapons like throwing hammers or throwing axes expire when you throw them? I can't find any info in the manual.


There are probably going to be more questions over the coming months, but thanks a bunch for helping out
1: You can only use one per encoutner, but you may have several to choose from when you do so.

2: Bear in mind that many rituals use a given key skill, but have no penalties if you're not very good at that skill, and you don't have to be trained in a skill to use it to cast rituals...  Also, Nature is useful to train for a Cleric anyway.

3:Magic thrown weapons return.  Mundane thrown weapons do not, but are not expended when thrown, if you have time you can go back and collect them.
Harrying your Prey, the Easy Way: A Hunter's Handbook - the first of what will hopefully be many CharOp efforts on my part. The Blinker - teleport everywhere. An Eladrin Knight/Eldritch Knight. CB != rules source.
Alot of rituals list a KEY SKILL and say that no roll is required or that a roll of 1 still has some effect.
This is because rituals with different skills require different components to preform.
To do NATURE rituals you need rare herbs, sacred oils or alchemical reagents just woun't do.
Pure magic dust residium can be used for anything though. 
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In preparation of a new DnD group I'm starting as a new player I thought I'd at least create a character to know what the players need to go though. I'll start out as the DM, but even the Player Manual is giving me headaches I've rolled a cleric, but here's two sections of rules I can't get to make sense:

Channel Divinity
There are multiple powers mentioned for cleric, some as cleric feature, some as feat (feature and feat, two different things right?). Do I get all of them and pick the one I want to use during the encounter or am I supposed to make a choice? There's Divine Fortune, Turn undead, and for example Kord's Favor

As a cleric, you get Divine Fortune and Turn Undead automatically IIRC.  To get Kord's Favor you have to spend a feat to get that since it's a Feat Utility.  Regardless of how many Channel Divinity powers you have, you only get to use one per encounter, unless you have some game element that lets you spend more than one (which can happen later).
Ritual casting
The manual states I've mastered Gentle Repose, and I can choose one other level 1 ritual. The point is I haven't trained Arcana or Nature, making all level 1 rituals useless. Can and should I still pick one and have a use for it somehow, or isn't it even possible due to my choice of skills?

AFAIK, you don't need to be trained in any skills to use any rituals, and many rituals have a skill as a key skill but don't even require you to make a roll anyway.  Get nature though, it's good.
Throwing weapons
I've thrown in a tiny last minute question that I ran into: do throwing weapons like throwing hammers or throwing axes expire when you throw them? I can't find any info in the manual.

No, weapons don't expire when you throw them.  Even arrows don't break unless the DM says they do - expending ammo is kind of optional in 4e.  As a DM myself, I never enforce it.

Welcome to the game, feel free to ask questions, don't sweat the more "intense" community members, and have fun! 

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Arrows explicitly are expended.  However, most DMs don't bother tracking that sort of minutiae, since with the treasure rewards for first level, you could buy enough arrows to last your entire career.
Harrying your Prey, the Easy Way: A Hunter's Handbook - the first of what will hopefully be many CharOp efforts on my part. The Blinker - teleport everywhere. An Eladrin Knight/Eldritch Knight. CB != rules source.
Arrows explicitly are expended.  However, most DMs don't bother tracking that sort of minutiae, since with the treasure rewards for first level, you could buy enough arrows to last your entire career.

Unless you're actually using magical arrows of some kind. Those are important to track.

 General rule of thumb - ammo is expended (just like bullets), things you throw are not, unless you throw them off a cliff or something and they are not magical.

Give the Ranger you love the gift that keeps on giving: an Endless Quiver.  No more tracking (mundane) arrows, no muss, no fuss. 

OD&D, 1E and 2E challenged the player. 3E challenged the character, not the player. Now 4E takes it a step further by challenging a GROUP OF PLAYERS to work together as a TEAM. That's why I love 4E.

"Your ability to summon a horde of celestial superbeings at will is making my ... BMX skills look a bit redundant."

"People treat their lack of imagination as if it's the measure of what's silly. Which is silly." - Noon

"Challenge" is overrated.  "Immersion" is usually just a more pretentious way of saying "having fun playing D&D."

"Falling down is how you grow.  Staying down is how you die.  It's not what happens to you, it's what you do after it happens.”

There are two type of clerics and it sounds like you are playing one from PHB1, which wizards later renamed the Templar.  

If you only have PHB1 then you have divine fortune and turn undead and by default you can use one of those two powers once an encounter.   You can then take feats that let you expand the ways you can use Channel Divinity, but you can still only use Channel Divinity once per encounter.

On to what happens if you use more than only PHB1:

Later published materials added more options.  Instead of divine fortune you can select Favor of the Gods instead.  Instead of turn undead, you can take Punish the Profane or Healer's Mercy instead.

If you play an essentials cleric called a Warpriest, instead of turn undead and divine fortune you get Smite Undead along with a second power determined by your domain.

There are also feats, paragon paths, and items that let you use channel divinity more than once an encounter.

There are also a lot more low level rituals in other sources that you can pick up like Brew Potion. 

On to what happens if you use more than only PHB1:

 



In addition to what Gelatinous Octahedron mentioned, there's a class feature called Battle Cleric's Lore that can be swapped in for your Healer's Lore.  It's known for being so good that a number of other classes will multi-class into cleric just for that feature.
Give the Ranger you love the gift that keeps on giving: an Endless Quiver.  No more tracking (mundane) arrows, no muss, no fuss. 



I would agree, except that for the price of one Endless Quiver you can literally buy as many arrows as any *50* multi-attacking BowRangers can possibly use in the course of all of their careers combined.

Still, tracking ammo in D&D is boring, irrelevant, and stupid, and so if the Endless Quiver is what it takes to make your DM shut up about it, it's worth the price.
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When I'm GMing, my method for handling non-magical ammo goes thus:
Buy and carry 4x the standard serving of ammo, then you have enough ammo to last for all your normal needs.

If you get your equipment taken/have to spend a exceptionaly long time between re-supply, then running out of ammo may come up in a dramatic/interesting fashion, but shouldn't be an insurmountable problem.

   My default position on ammo is that you spend about 5 gp on ammo at character creation and then you forget about keeping track of it - by the time you blow through that many pieces of ammo, your character has enough treasure to make buying ammo something they do with their pocket change, not their treasure.

   When I actually have a player that cares enough to keep track, I prefer to run non-magical ammunition as a daily/encounter resource.

Daily -  You buy X amount of arrows, and that's how many you can use each day - Narratively, during an extended rest (and travel and other downtime, etc.) you replenish your supply through whatever means are situationally appropriate: looting enemy archers, foraging for materials and crafting your own ammo or reclaiming still-usable components from expended ammo and recycling them.

 Encounter -  During an encounter, you have access to one unit (however many comes in one quiver/case/bag) of your ammo. On the off chance you run out, it's a Minor Action to switch to a new one, assuming the rest of your ammo isn't stowed away in your backpack or other container. If you have the Quickdraw feat or any other method of free item-swapping, it's a Free Action.

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I thank you all for the extensive replies, I only read the first replies and thought the discussion would end there, since my questions felt really basic. Really awesome to see how you all contribute to the answer and to show a beginner how free or strict the game can be played.

I'll need to take some more time to read through the replies carefully, but I thank everyone for their contribution so far.

The first game is planned april 27, so I still have time to prepare properly
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