Loose Cannon Character

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The Setup: the group is made of a first time DM and 4 players, with myself being the only player with very much experience in the game. The party make-up is a human fighter, a dragonborn fighter, a human? assassin, and I'm playing a kalashtar hybrid bard-sorceror.

The Problem: The Dm has thus far been very VERY laid back, to the point of literally making everything up as he went from the moment he sat down to the minute we finished up (we play 12+ hour sessions). It would be awesome, except that my kalashtar bard (/sorceror) is based off of Red Mage from 8bit Theatre.

The result is that i have a character who's very nature is "off the wall chaos", who has an impressive bluff skill, and a Dm who seams all to happy to indulge the party's every whim. Thus far there's been no negative feedback from anyone, but i'm worried about the long-term stability of the game. we're only one dungeon in and my character has already 
    A. Convinced the entire party that he's a super genius strategist.
    B. Amassed 1 million in gold peices. (compared to the 50 gp of the second richest party member)
    C. Lead the party on a wild goose hunt across the countryside so he could stop by a different city because the first one ran out of cash to buy stuff from him with.

I know that I'm the player, and can stop. but at this point that's like saying "here's an open sandbox where everyone does what you ask them to because you have a passive bluff of 30. Oh, but you shouldn't abuse that power even though you're character would". Like i said, everyone seams to be having a blast, but with a DM that gives the BARD a ring that gives him a +9 to bluff, it's hard to see any challenge being difficult by the time we reach lvl 5 (we started lvl 4).

I guess what i'm asking is, should i be worried, or am i overanylizing? if i am right in my worry, how can i fix it when it seams like i'm the problem? i don't want to play this character wrong, but neither do i want to break the game because of my luck+greater experience.    

thanks for reading through my wall of text, and even more thanks for any and all advise given. I don't get on the forums very often, so it may be a week or more before i respond.
Just rein it in.  Your character could easily change his motivation because apparently it's shamefully easy to do, well, anything.  Or since he already has a million GP, just retire him and make a character who's less ridiculous.
Agreed. Retcon your character. Doesn't need to be awkward "i'm holding myself back despite really intending to do this", you can just say "this is my new personality. That's that."

I get being nutty about a particular skill, but that doesn't mean you have to use it to the detriment of the game. xD 
I don't know about you but I think if my character was essentially Red Mage, I'd enjoy playing him more if the rest of the party's characters were essentially Black Mage, Fighter and Thief. Maybe you should consider putting him aside until you can find some players who would want to do that (and someone willing to DM a game containing BM).

Also isn't amassing 1,000,000gp more what Thief would do anyway?
A. Convinced the entire party that he's a super genius strategist.



Social skill mechanics don't work on other PCs unless they allow it to. It's likely the DM and the players at the table don't know this. Let them know.

B. Amassed 1 million in gold peices. (compared to the 50 gp of the second richest party member)



Ask your DM what interesting fantasy adventuring world complications would arise from having that much gold. Better yet, suggest how you'd like to have your wealth threatened by powerful, evil forces. Then play to find out what happens.

C. Lead the party on a wild goose hunt across the countryside so he could stop by a different city because the first one ran out of cash to buy stuff from him with.



As long as it was fun and you weren't blocking the ideas of the other players from seeing the light of day, no big deal. If you were blocking other players' ideas, stop that.

I know that I'm the player, and can stop. but at this point that's like saying "here's an open sandbox where everyone does what you ask them to because you have a passive bluff of 30. Oh, but you shouldn't abuse that power even though you're character would". Like i said, everyone seams to be having a blast, but with a DM that gives the BARD a ring that gives him a +9 to bluff, it's hard to see any challenge being difficult by the time we reach lvl 5 (we started lvl 4).



When I DM, social skills only work on NPCs and monsters if you're speaking to their motivations or goals in some way. Lie all you want to the NPC - unless you're in the position to help that NPC advance their goals or can convince them that you are or have leverage over them, it's not a roll.

I guess what i'm asking is, should i be worried, or am i overanylizing? if i am right in my worry, how can i fix it when it seams like i'm the problem? i don't want to play this character wrong, but neither do i want to break the game because of my luck+greater experience.



It wouldn't hurt to ask the other players out-of-game if they're okay with the status quo. Then ask them what kind of hijinks and challenges they'd like to see, too, and make those suggestions to the DM.

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Don't Prep the Plot | Structure First, Story Last | Prep Tips | Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything | No Myth Roleplaying
Players: 11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer | You Are Not Your Character     Hilarious D&D Actual Play Podcast: Crit Juice!

FREE CONTENT: Encounters With Alternate Goals  |  Full-Contact Futbol   |   Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs  |  Re-Imagining Phandelver  |  Three Pillars of Immersion

Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith

Social skill mechanics don't work on other PCs unless they allow it to.


It can work really well when they do allow it, though. I still have fond memories of travelling with Dave the Not-A-Warlock. (Any time the possibility of him being an infernal pact warlock came up, he would simply say "I'm not a warlock," and roll sufficiently high on his Bluff check that our characters always believed him. It was only after he left the party in the middle of the night, taking a manual on demon-summoning we'd just recovered with him, that any of our characters began to suspect he might not have been telling the truth...)
It can work really well when they do allow it, though. I still have fond memories of travelling with Dave the Not-A-Warlock. (Any time the possibility of him being an infernal pact warlock came up, he would simply say "I'm not a warlock," and roll sufficiently high on his Bluff check that our characters always believed him. It was only after he left the party in the middle of the night, taking a manual on demon-summoning we'd just recovered with him, that any of our characters began to suspect he might not have been telling the truth...)



The reason you might perceive it as working well is because you were unknowningly using the "Yes, and..." technique of improvisational acting which in my opinion makes games so much better. The only difference is that you were using a roll to justify your use of that technique. You don't have to leave it to the dice. At our table, the player would simply state (in character or out of character) that his character is a warlock, but that he doesn't say that he is and tries to dissuade anyone from thinking that's what he is. The other players would then accept that ("Yes"), and explain why ("and...") they believe him or don't believe him but turn a blind eye (for example). No roll necessary.

Sometimes people use social skills as a way to shut down the ideas of other players, pointing to a high roll result that "forces" them to do something. That's not how the game mechanics work and blocking in this manner is bad. 

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
DMs: Don't Prep the Plot | Structure First, Story Last | Prep Tips | Spoilers Don't Spoil Anything | No Myth Roleplaying
Players: 11 Ways to Be a Better Roleplayer | You Are Not Your Character     Hilarious D&D Actual Play Podcast: Crit Juice!

FREE CONTENT: Encounters With Alternate Goals  |  Full-Contact Futbol   |   Pre-Gen D&D 5e PCs  |  Re-Imagining Phandelver  |  Three Pillars of Immersion

Follow me on Twitter: @is3rith

The only difference is that you were using a roll to justify your use of that technique. You don't have to leave it to the dice.


To be fair, it was more a running gag. The dice rolls soon became simply part of the ritual of the gag - it didn't matter what he rolled, we'd just claim we'd rolled low enough on insight to believe him.

Actually, when the DM brought him back as a villain who's defeat brought us to paragon tier, he incorporated the gag into a power for him (I never saw the monster stat block, so I'm guessing this is what it was like):

Standard Action
Encounter ♦ Charm
Close 
burst 10
Target One enemy in burst
Effect Dave speaks in the target's voice, trying to convince the target's allies that he's actually the target in Dave's body. Make a secondary attack.
Secondary Target All enemies other than the primary target within the primary attack's range
Secondary Attack Bluff vs. Will
Hit The target believes Dave and the primary target have swapped bodies (save ends). While the effect persists, the target treats Dave as an ally, and the primary target as an enemy.

We all thought it was a pretty cool idea that added some great tension to a climactic boss fight. (Fortunately, those of us who were hit all made our first save against the effect, so the poor dragonborn sorceress didn't get hurt too bad. I think the DM target her for flavor reasons - as the only female in the party, our characters would be less likely to believe Dave could mimic her voice.)
I disagree, you are doing nothing wrong from what I can see. It's largely a difference in expections between you and the DM, and possibly a larger issue with the DM's style then a fault of your own. You are exacting to be a upcoming, almost business person who would probably lose more money then you earn that he rewards your successes a bit too much.

I personally wouldn't change anything about how you behave provided your character continues to desire greater wealth. Just perhaps it is best if you just take the oppertunity to discuss with the DM about him making it too easy for you to be rich, and suggest that he dials it down or alternatively turns it into a plot hook of some description.

Ask your DM what interesting fantasy adventuring world complications would arise from having that much gold. Better yet, suggest how you'd like to have your wealth threatened by powerful, evil forces. Then play to find out what happens.

To add to this idea. 


Erase all that gold off your sheet. The next time your party finishes resting, act shocked and concerned. Demand to know who stole it, and where it went. Once you discover it wasn't the other PCs, convince them to help you find the thief. 


You thought you were the worlds best thief, but someone got the better of you and stole everything you own. Time to get it back. But first, you have to find out who it was.


If your DM still won't pick up and feed you clues as to who it may have been, start giving yourself clues. "I go gather info for a bit" and leave the party for an hour or so. Come back with a map that someone totally gave you (You drew yourself, and decided your PC got from someone) to the city of thieves. If anyone knows who it could have been, they would be here. 

"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"                               " As usual, Krusk comments with assuredness, but lacks the clarity and awareness of what he's talking about"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"        "Wow, thank you very much"

"Your advice is the worst"


Ask your DM what interesting fantasy adventuring world complications would arise from having that much gold. Better yet, suggest how you'd like to have your wealth threatened by powerful, evil forces. Then play to find out what happens.

To add to this idea. 


Erase all that gold off your sheet. The next time your party finishes resting, act shocked and concerned. Demand to know who stole it, and where it went. Once you discover it wasn't the other PCs, convince them to help you find the thief. 


You thought you were the worlds best thief, but someone got the better of you and stole everything you own. Time to get it back. But first, you have to find out who it was.


If your DM still won't pick up and feed you clues as to who it may have been, start giving yourself clues. "I go gather info for a bit" and leave the party for an hour or so. Come back with a map that someone totally gave you (You drew yourself, and decided your PC got from someone) to the city of thieves. If anyone knows who it could have been, they would be here. 




This sounds epic. it'll be interesting to see how it works out. thanks everyone for your advise on this matter.
The Setup: the group is made of a first time DM and 4 players, with myself being the only player with very much experience in the game. The party make-up is a human fighter, a dragonborn fighter, a human? assassin, and I'm playing a kalashtar hybrid bard-sorceror.

The Problem: The Dm has thus far been very VERY laid back, to the point of literally making everything up as he went from the moment he sat down to the minute we finished up (we play 12+ hour sessions). It would be awesome, except that my kalashtar bard (/sorceror) is based off of Red Mage from 8bit Theatre.

The result is that i have a character who's very nature is "off the wall chaos", who has an impressive bluff skill, and a Dm who seams all to happy to indulge the party's every whim. Thus far there's been no negative feedback from anyone, but i'm worried about the long-term stability of the game. we're only one dungeon in and my character has already 
    A. Convinced the entire party that he's a super genius strategist.
    B. Amassed 1 million in gold peices. (compared to the 50 gp of the second richest party member)
    C. Lead the party on a wild goose hunt across the countryside so he could stop by a different city because the first one ran out of cash to buy stuff from him with.

I know that I'm the player, and can stop. but at this point that's like saying "here's an open sandbox where everyone does what you ask them to because you have a passive bluff of 30. Oh, but you shouldn't abuse that power even though you're character would". Like i said, everyone seams to be having a blast, but with a DM that gives the BARD a ring that gives him a +9 to bluff, it's hard to see any challenge being difficult by the time we reach lvl 5 (we started lvl 4).

I guess what i'm asking is, should i be worried, or am i overanylizing? if i am right in my worry, how can i fix it when it seams like i'm the problem? i don't want to play this character wrong, but neither do i want to break the game because of my luck+greater experience.    

thanks for reading through my wall of text, and even more thanks for any and all advise given. I don't get on the forums very often, so it may be a week or more before i respond.

It sounds like the only problem you're having thus far is a lack of challenge.

A - sounds like an interesting complication
B - You can always say "I'm rich!" and retire the character. Redistribute the wealth or have your character build something big and lasting, a titanic statue dedicated to yourself or a fortress, or a naval fleet, maybe. That way, if the world lasts, the DM might even remember it as a monument to monty haul.
C - if the wild goose chase was fun, then no problem-o.
A rogue with a bowl of slop can be a controller. WIZARD PC: Can I substitute Celestial Roc Guano for my fireball spells? DM: Awesome. Yes. When in doubt, take action.... that's generally the best course. Even Sun Tsu knew that, and he didn't have internets.