Friday Night Magic Question--New Player

18 posts / 0 new
Last post
I just started playing Magic two weeks ago and I'd like to go to my local FNM sometime soon to play with some folks.  Is it okay etiquette to request the opposing player to briefly explain each card they play as I do not have a knowledge of many of the cards floating in standard? I am not sure if players do this to begin with and maybe this is a silly question. 

Thanks. 
Depends on the room. At my FNM it would be OK. I know some places that would give warnings for it if you did it constantly. Best idea would be to talk to whoever is running the event and ask ahead of time.

New Players Click Here
This board uses a feature known as Autocard. It allows you to tag a card or group of cards and link them directly to the Gatherer for easy reference.

Here's how it works: Say I start a discussion about Lightning Bolt. It is well and fine for people who are familiar with Lightning Bolt and everything Lightning Bolt does.

Suppose somebody doesn't know what this card does.

I can autocard like this: [c]Lightning Bolt[/c] and it appears to everyone like this: Lightning Bolt.

You can do the same thing to an entire decklist at once by using [deck] and [/deck] at the begining and end of your list respectively.

This will make your decks easier to understand and get you better responses.

 

Here are some useful links to get you started:

Building Your First Deck

The Rule of Nine

Magic: The Gathering Rules

Magic: The Gathering Formats

Tips & Tricks

Catotheyounger wrote:
Back when I was in high school, I used to write little quotes on the whiteboard of my chemistry class, little, funny things that I'd made up and attributed to an anonymous author. Just tiny things I found amusing. Some time near the end of the year, a substitute teacher came in, read it, and told us a quote she had heard from a 13 year old girl. I don't remember what it was, but the quote sounded deep and philosophical. Then I actually thought about it. I realized that the quote was actually meaningless, but simply couched in the language of philosophy and depth. And that's what your post is. It is meaningless bull**** that you said in such a way as to make it seem sophisticated. But just as a lab coat doesn't make you a scientist, language won't make you a philosopher. Only love of wisdom will. And until then, you will always remind me of a nameless 13 year old girl.
FNM is casual REL so it's fine to ask what they do. Lots of players are fine with it because not everybody gets to play all of the time. Most of the time if I see my opponent reading the card upside down I will turn it around for them and explain. 
People at FMN tend to be pretty casual, just testing decks and so on
 That being said some people may get mad at you but even so you still have the right to read the card
It would be good etiquette to say something at the start of the match. As for a warning, no actual judge would ever give a warning at an FNM level event for simply asking for card info. I can't imagine what kind of store would.

IMAGE(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g424/syreal94/SIGS1AL.png) Sig by zpikduM.

It begins with imagining a room full of trolls...

New Players Click Here
This board uses a feature known as Autocard. It allows you to tag a card or group of cards and link them directly to the Gatherer for easy reference.

Here's how it works: Say I start a discussion about Lightning Bolt. It is well and fine for people who are familiar with Lightning Bolt and everything Lightning Bolt does.

Suppose somebody doesn't know what this card does.

I can autocard like this: [c]Lightning Bolt[/c] and it appears to everyone like this: Lightning Bolt.

You can do the same thing to an entire decklist at once by using [deck] and [/deck] at the begining and end of your list respectively.

This will make your decks easier to understand and get you better responses.

 

Here are some useful links to get you started:

Building Your First Deck

The Rule of Nine

Magic: The Gathering Rules

Magic: The Gathering Formats

Tips & Tricks

Catotheyounger wrote:
Back when I was in high school, I used to write little quotes on the whiteboard of my chemistry class, little, funny things that I'd made up and attributed to an anonymous author. Just tiny things I found amusing. Some time near the end of the year, a substitute teacher came in, read it, and told us a quote she had heard from a 13 year old girl. I don't remember what it was, but the quote sounded deep and philosophical. Then I actually thought about it. I realized that the quote was actually meaningless, but simply couched in the language of philosophy and depth. And that's what your post is. It is meaningless bull**** that you said in such a way as to make it seem sophisticated. But just as a lab coat doesn't make you a scientist, language won't make you a philosopher. Only love of wisdom will. And until then, you will always remind me of a nameless 13 year old girl.
Just explain at the start of a match that you're fairly new to the game and that you may need to have a look at the cards your opponent plays until you get the gist of what they do.

Usually when I'm playing someone newer and I can tell they don't know all the cards I'll just casually turn it to face them and say something like 'Hey, if you don't know what a card does when I play it just feel free to turn it over and have a look.'   I mean, as long as they aren't like...randomly unsleeving my cards and licking them to obtain the rules text via osmosis.  It's public information and they need to know what the cards do.
People at FMN tend to be pretty casual, just testing decks and so on

My experience is that this varies greatly from store to store and even from player to player. Overall, the overwhelming majority of players won't have a problem with you not knowing all the cards. What you should do is simply ask if you may look at the card, then pick it up and read through to see what it does. I think it would be more awkward to ask your opponent to explain it to you, although you could ask questions.

People at FMN tend to be pretty casual, just testing decks and so on

My experience is that this varies greatly from store to store and even from player to player. Overall, the overwhelming majority of players won't have a problem with you not knowing all the cards. What you should do is simply ask if you may look at the card, then pick it up and read through to see what it does. I think it would be more awkward to ask your opponent to explain it to you, although you could ask questions.



Although it can really be fun to go to a store you've never been to before, act like a complete noob, and ask them what their cards do. Then, if they lie or whatever, call a judge over and say "so-and-so here says this card does such-and-such."
The faces, man 

(at)MrEnglish22

On my last FNM, i practically explained my oponent my strategy to win and how good his cards were, well the match was one turn away from finishing and ended up with a new fnm friend xD.
I've been to my FNM store long enough to recognize a new player. (At least to the store) And because my deck has a lot of text on almost every card, I just take the initiative and explain each card as I play it. I think it is just basic etiquette to have the opponent actually understand anything you're doing.

And all will know the wonder of my dark and jeweled sky, when all the world is wrapped in an eternal lullaby.

You shouldn't have a problem with letting your opponent read your cards. Everyone was there at some point.

Might I suggest, to look at the top decks in the meta right now and sort of study their cards. Not only will it let you know what the card is, but it will let you figure out what their strategy is and what they are trying to do.
Show
http://www.mtgfanatic.com/?ForumReferrerID=99147 MTGFanatic, best site to buy cards.
I am Blue/Black
I am Blue/Black
Take The Magic Dual Colour Test - Beta today!
Created with Rum and Monkey's Personality Test Generator.
I'm both selfish and rational. I'm scheming, secretive and manipulative; I use knowledge as a tool for personal gain, and in turn obtaining more knowledge. At best, I am mysterious and stealthy; at worst, I am distrustful and opportunistic.
I would classify my FNM standard metagame as highly competitive and I would go so far as to say that any player better damn well be prepared to explain his cards and plays on request (e.g. Fiend Hunter + Cloudshift exploit).
I play this Island and you just scoop it up.
Slave of Tibalt. Currently trading for foils of my bro. PM me. Tarmogoyf on Twitter. Follow me. Team GFG Guns, Fame, Glory Those that require a sig for the ego simply haven't had enough kind words thrown his or her way. Currently looking for prerelease Plains! People who have mailed me rares:
Show
Malpheas: THANK YOU FOR THE FOIL TIBALT, YOU BEAUTIFUL GUY, YOU! Suudsu2200: Armageddon! Sèance, Dominating Licid, Words of War, Gaea's Anthem, Momentous Fall, Nyxathid PM me to make it happen. Your username will end up here, as the cards you sent me. I reserve the right to order your usernames by the cards I liked the best. Oh, and if you send me some Islands in the package, I'll sign them and mail them back.
Personally, I love explaining what I'm doing. After hours of constructing the deck and more playtesting, I want you to know exactly why you are losing.

and can someone explain to me the aforementioned Fiend Hunter Cloudshift combo because I don't get it at all...

EDH decks I play:

 

Prossh: http://community.wizards.com/forum/commander-edh/threads/4101381

 

Derevi: http://community.wizards.com/forum/commander-edh/threads/4115936

 

Kaalia (the beats)

 

Zur (disgusting combo)

 

Damia (Bug Elf deck)

 

Numot (Stax)

 

Griselbrand (French)

 

Ghave (Uber combo)

 

Muzzio (Oops, Blightsteel)

Fiend Hunter enters play and first ability triggers to exile target creature while Fiend Hunter in play. Goes on stack.
Cloudshift gets put on stack so resolves before above ability.
This causes Fiend Hunters second ability to go on stack, to return exiled creature to the field when leaves play.
Now because the second ability will resolve before the first, there is no chance for the creature to return to play so is permanently exiled.
Fiend Hunter enters play and first ability triggers to exile target creature while Fiend Hunter in play. Goes on stack.
Cloudshift gets put on stack so resolves before above ability.
This causes Fiend Hunters second ability to go on stack, to return exiled creature to the field when leaves play.
Now because the second ability will resolve before the first, there is no chance for the creature to return to play so is permanently exiled.



Man, my friends are gonna hate that (if I can satisfactorily explain it to them)

EDH decks I play:

 

Prossh: http://community.wizards.com/forum/commander-edh/threads/4101381

 

Derevi: http://community.wizards.com/forum/commander-edh/threads/4115936

 

Kaalia (the beats)

 

Zur (disgusting combo)

 

Damia (Bug Elf deck)

 

Numot (Stax)

 

Griselbrand (French)

 

Ghave (Uber combo)

 

Muzzio (Oops, Blightsteel)

I play this Island and you just scoop it up.


Annnd that sums up my experiences with Legacy.

(at)MrEnglish22