Help with dragon

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I'm playing 3e as an 11th level wizard. I have a young green dragon cohort. My ? Is there a way to age my dragon other than a wish?
WISH. DOES. NOT. DO. THAT.

Also, there are several feats that can give you something like that in the Draconomicon, but they suck. But, then again, so do Green Dragons, especially ones with crappy or no casting. Plus, they're evil, so it's normally a moot point.
Customer Disservice of the House of Trolls Resident Secretly Ron Paul God of Spite and Sloth
Well, you could probably use bestow curse or greater bestow curse in approximately the same way as wish (in a way, bestow curse is like a low-grade negative wish).  I vaguely recall some aging spell, but I think it had specific restrictions to prevent benefits; I'll have to check.
WISH. DOES. NOT. DO. THAT.



"You may try to use a wish to produce greater effects than these, but doing so is dangerous. (The wish may pervert your intent into a literal but undesirable fulfillment or only a partial fulfillment.) "

Wish has the potential to do almost anything, it's just risky.

The kraken stirs. And ten billion sushi dinners cry out for vengeance. - Good Omens

Co-Author of the Dreamfane, Euralden Eye, Gajuisan Crawler, Gruesome Lurker, Fulminating Crab, Ironglass Rose, Sheengrass Swarm, Spryjack, Usunag, and Warp Drifter, and author of the Magmal Horror from Force of Nature.

My most popular campaign item; for all your adventuring convenience.
Zauber's Mutable Rod: This rod has a number of useful functions that make it easier to live in the wilderness. It is made of polished wood, with five studlike buttons on one end. Each button produces a different effect when pressed. Unless otherwise noted, the rod’s functions have no limit on the number of times they can be employed. When button 1 is pressed, one end of the rod produces a small flame, equivalent to a candle. When button 2 is pressed, the rod unfolds into a two-person tent, complete with bedrolls and warm blankets. When button 3 is pressed, the rod becomes a one-handed hammer, suitable for pounding pitons into a wall. When button 4 is pressed, the rod becomes a sturdy iron spade. When button 5 is pressed, the rod becomes a wooden bucket able to hold 2 gallons of liquid. Once per day, it can be commanded to fill with fresh water. If the rod is seriously damaged or broken in any of its alternate forms (button 2, 3, 4, or 5), it reverts to its basic rod form and cannot be activated for 24 hours. Moderate conjuration; CL 9th; Craft Rod, minor creation; Price 375 gp; Weight 2 lb.
No it doesn't. Because partial fulfillment can turn anything into pretty much anything else.

"I wish I was eternally youthful." > "I wish I was eternally youthful." > You cease to exist.

See how it works.
Customer Disservice of the House of Trolls Resident Secretly Ron Paul God of Spite and Sloth
#1 The "How" doesn't particularly matter as aging the dragon in any way would make them too badass to be your "sidekick" anymore. Unless you're trying to manufacture armies of Great Wyrm dragons, it's not going to give you what you want.

#2: Dump the Dragon into an accelerated time stream on another plane. There are sure to be some in the Abyss. There's EVERYTHING in the Abyss. It's probably what the Wish would do anyway.
I believe there's an "Age Dragon" type spell somewhere.  I know there was in 2E, at least.
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I do, however, have one last lesson on this subject. That last one? The only build in this post that can one-shot average opponents[by dealing twice as much damage as they have HP? I would argue that it is not optimized. Why isn't it optimized? Because it's overkill. Overkill is NOT optimizing. This means that there are portions of this build dedicated to damage which can safely be removed and thrown elsewhere. For example, you probably don't need both Leap Attack AND Headlong Rush at the same time. You could pick up Extra Rage feats for stamina, feats to support AoO effects, feats that work towards potential prestige classes, and so on. However, you could also shift our ability scores around somewhat. I mean, if you're getting results like that with 16 starting Strength, maybe you can lower it to 14, and free up four points to spend somewhere else - perhaps back into Charisma, giving you some oomph for Intimidating Rage or Imperious Command if you want. You can continue to tune this until it deals "enough" damage - and that "enough" does not need to be "100%". It could easily be, say, 80% (leaving the rest to the team), if your DM is the sort who would ban one-hit killers.
Tempest_Stormwind on Character Optimization
So when do you think Bachmann will be saying she met a mother the previous night that had a son who got a blood transfusion using a gay guy's blood, and now the son is retardedly gay?
When she meets CJ's mom?
Resident Pithed-Off Dragon Poon Slayer of the House of Trolls
I also seem to remember an "Age Dragon" type spell somewhere, most likely the Draconomicon, which was basically a boost type spell for a true dragon.

Now aside from that I don't suggest you push things.  I don't know why you have a dragon cohort but giving an 11th-level PC a 16th-ECL character as a cohort is already insane.  I believe the "appropriate" dragon cohorts are list by level in the Draconomicon for 3.5 and Defenders of the Faith for 3.0.
 
If it isn't specifically defined by the wish spell, any wish attempt suddenly turns into a malovent force that tries to screw you over as hard as possible.

"I wish my dragon were X years older" probably will send you forward X years, aging you the entire time, and if you're not dead, your party either is or has lost track of you long ago and given up, and the dragon has gone his own way as well.
It says you can try to produce a greater effect, not you can produce a greater effect. And if the fighter jumps of a cliff and tries to fly, does he magically sprout wings? So, yeah, wishing for anything unspecified? At best does nothing and is just as likely to  kill you.
Customer Disservice of the House of Trolls Resident Secretly Ron Paul God of Spite and Sloth
It says you can try to produce a greater effect, not you can produce a greater effect. And if the fighter jumps of a cliff and tries to fly, does he magically sprout wings? So, yeah, wishing for anything unspecified? At best does nothing and is just as likely to  kill you.



Sept' there's one problem with that interpretation.


Wish

Universal





























Level:Sor/Wiz 9
Components:V, XP
Casting Time:1 standard action
Range:See text
Target, Effect, or Area:See text
Duration:See text
Saving Throw:See text
Spell Resistance:Yes

Wish is the mightiest spell a wizard or sorcerer can cast. By simply speaking aloud, you can alter reality to better suit you.


Even wish, however, has its limits.


A wish can produce any one of the following effects.



  • Duplicate any wizard or sorcerer spell of 8th level or lower, provided the spell is not of a school prohibited to you.

  • Duplicate any other spell of 6th level or lower, provided the spell is not of a school prohibited to you.

  • Duplicate any wizard or sorcerer spell of 7th level or lower even if it’s of a prohibited school.

  • Duplicate any other spell of 5th level or lower even if it’s of a prohibited school.

  • Undo the harmful effects of many other spells, such as geas/quest or insanity.

  • Create a nonmagical item of up to 25,000 gp in value.

  • Create a magic item, or add to the powers of an existing magic item.

  • Grant a creature a +1 inherent bonus to an ability score. Two to five wish spells cast in immediate succession can grant a creature a +2 to +5 inherent bonus to an ability score (two wishes for a +2 inherent bonus, three for a +3 inherent bonus, and so on). Inherent bonuses are instantaneous, so they cannot be dispelled. Note: An inherent bonus may not exceed +5 for a single ability score, and inherent bonuses to a particular ability score do not stack, so only the best one applies.

  • Remove injuries and afflictions. A single wish can aid one creature per caster level, and all subjects are cured of the same kind of affliction. For example, you could heal all the damage you and your companions have taken, or remove all poison effects from everyone in the party, but not do both with the same wish. A wish can never restore the experience point loss from casting a spell or the level or Constitution loss from being raised from the dead.

  • Revive the dead. A wish can bring a dead creature back to life by duplicating a resurrection spell. A wish can revive a dead creature whose body has been destroyed, but the task takes two wishes, one to recreate the body and another to infuse the body with life again. A wish cannot prevent a character who was brought back to life from losing an experience level.

  • Transport travelers. A wish can lift one creature per caster level from anywhere on any plane and place those creatures anywhere else on any plane regardless of local conditions. An unwilling target gets a Will save to negate the effect, and spell resistance (if any) applies.

  • Undo misfortune. A wish can undo a single recent event. The wish forces a reroll of any roll made within the last round (including your last turn). Reality reshapes itself to accommodate the new result. For example, a wish could undo an opponent’s successful save, a foe’s successful critical hit (either the attack roll or the critical roll), a friend’s failed save, and so on. The reroll, however, may be as bad as or worse than the original roll. An unwilling target gets a Will save to negate the effect, and spell resistance (if any) applies.


You may try to use a wish to produce greater effects than these, but doing so is dangerous. (The wish may pervert your intent into a literal but undesirable fulfillment or only a partial fulfillment.)


Duplicated spells allow saves and spell resistance as normal (but save DCs are for 9th-level spells).


Material Component

When a wish duplicates a spell with a material component that costs more than 10,000 gp, you must provide that component.


XP Cost

The minimum XP cost for casting wish is 5,000 XP. When a wish duplicates a spell that has an XP cost, you must pay 5,000 XP or that cost, whichever is more. When a wish creates or improves a magic item, you must pay twice the normal XP cost for crafting or improving the item, plus an additional 5,000 XP.


Last I checked, may didn't mean "always will 100% of the time". Reading the text it clearly says that you can both try to achieve greater effects than listed, and that trying to do so "may" lead to perversion of the intent or partial fulfillment, but that will always not be the outcome (essential that part is left up to DM arbitration). Also, the text says that perversion/partial fulfillment occurs when trying to produce effects greater than those listed, so its totally up to the DM in the first place to decide if advanced aging is an effect that is more powerful than any listed (as an example, if bestow cures or greater bestow curse could achieve the effect, so could wish with no chance of repercussion).
Last I checked, may didn't mean "always will 100% of the time". Reading the text it clearly says that you can both try to achieve greater effects than listed, and that trying to do so "may" lead to perversion of the intent or partial fulfillment, but that will always not be the outcome (essential that part is left up to DM arbitration). Also, the text says that perversion/partial fulfillment occurs when trying to produce effects greater than those listed, so its totally up to the DM in the first place to decide if advanced aging is an effect that is more powerful than any listed (as an example, if bestow cures or greater bestow curse could achieve the effect, so could wish with no chance of repercussion).



You're not thinking like a DM.
No DM who is actually good is going to try and outright screw you, but Wish is the one spell (well, Miracle also) that if unchecked can 100% break the game as designed by the DM.

If you are trying to break the game with wish (and an advanced dragon cohort for an 11th level character is a game-breaker) than you are a greedy player, not a clever player, and the DM is entirely within his or her right to stop you. Now I am well aware that there are some subpar DM's out there, but assuming a decent one, what I said holds.

A nice DM would just disallow any result of an overly greedy wish, but even a nice DM is entirely within their rights to make the outcome a bit unpleasant. When you play with fire, expect to get burned, and that rule is already written into wish.
Last I checked, may didn't mean "always will 100% of the time". Reading the text it clearly says that you can both try to achieve greater effects than listed, and that trying to do so "may" lead to perversion of the intent or partial fulfillment, but that will always not be the outcome (essential that part is left up to DM arbitration). Also, the text says that perversion/partial fulfillment occurs when trying to produce effects greater than those listed, so its totally up to the DM in the first place to decide if advanced aging is an effect that is more powerful than any listed (as an example, if bestow cures or greater bestow curse could achieve the effect, so could wish with no chance of repercussion).



You're not thinking like a DM.
No DM who is actually good is going to try and outright screw you, but Wish is the one spell (well, Miracle also) that if unchecked can 100% break the game as designed by the DM.

If you are trying to break the game with wish (and an advanced dragon cohort for an 11th level character is a game-breaker) than you are a greedy player, not a clever player, and the DM is entirely within his or her right to stop you. Now I am well aware that there are some subpar DM's out there, but assuming a decent one, what I said holds.

A nice DM would just disallow any result of an overly greedy wish, but even a nice DM is entirely within their rights to make the outcome a bit unpleasant. When you play with fire, expect to get burned, and that rule is already written into wish.



I'd have to disagree with the sentiment that I didn't "think like a DM". A DM should know how the spell works in all of it's capacity. Nowhere did I say aging a dragon wasn't a game breaker, but that EA's interpretation of how it works was wrong as he is essentially saying that the spell will always go wrong if used for anything but it's explicitly listed effects. As a matter of fact if you re-read my post it essentially says that outside of it's explicitly listed effects anything that comes from a wish is up to DM arbitration, which (at least in my opinion) is exactly how a DM should view a questionable action in a game.
Going by the rules in the Draconomicon, you could use wish to get 25,000 gp of treasure in an appropriate form, and then simply hire a dragon to be your mount for a year.  As a DM, if I had a player wish for a dragon mount, I could therefore reasonably give it to them, the only real difficulty being that the dragon is its own creature, and may not make the most tractable mount.

So in this particular case, I'd probably allow aging via wish (on the basis that the result is about the same), with the dragon becoming like a hired dragon mount, instead of a cohort.  It's more powerful, but as a consequence of that, it no longer sees the PC as its leader.

It seems appropriately risky for an unusual use of wish.

The kraken stirs. And ten billion sushi dinners cry out for vengeance. - Good Omens

Co-Author of the Dreamfane, Euralden Eye, Gajuisan Crawler, Gruesome Lurker, Fulminating Crab, Ironglass Rose, Sheengrass Swarm, Spryjack, Usunag, and Warp Drifter, and author of the Magmal Horror from Force of Nature.

My most popular campaign item; for all your adventuring convenience.
Zauber's Mutable Rod: This rod has a number of useful functions that make it easier to live in the wilderness. It is made of polished wood, with five studlike buttons on one end. Each button produces a different effect when pressed. Unless otherwise noted, the rod’s functions have no limit on the number of times they can be employed. When button 1 is pressed, one end of the rod produces a small flame, equivalent to a candle. When button 2 is pressed, the rod unfolds into a two-person tent, complete with bedrolls and warm blankets. When button 3 is pressed, the rod becomes a one-handed hammer, suitable for pounding pitons into a wall. When button 4 is pressed, the rod becomes a sturdy iron spade. When button 5 is pressed, the rod becomes a wooden bucket able to hold 2 gallons of liquid. Once per day, it can be commanded to fill with fresh water. If the rod is seriously damaged or broken in any of its alternate forms (button 2, 3, 4, or 5), it reverts to its basic rod form and cannot be activated for 24 hours. Moderate conjuration; CL 9th; Craft Rod, minor creation; Price 375 gp; Weight 2 lb.
Actually, that also raises the point that if the player is using the rules for a dragon cohort, wishing it up in age category could actually make the dragon ineligible as a cohort depending on the players leadership score. So in a way the problem legitimately solves itself if the player is using it to break the system without even the need for the spell to go haywire in the first place (though depending on DM fiat that could still occur). If the dragon becomes to powerful, it instead deems it's former leader unworthy of it's new powers and leaves, probably with a big chunk of the characters treasure. If however the player is just trying to advance the current dragon that is serving them as a cohort so that he (the dragon) is the maximum allowed age category, well still maintaining the same dragon as an ally, that would not only make sense but seem like a legitimate use of the spell wish (which would not only save the time of recruiting a new dragon, but also make the player sink in a little bit of their resources in order to expedite their own power growth).
Bestow Curse can do it. That does not mean Wish can, unless you are emulating the spell. If you are, then the effect is permanent, rather than instantaneous, which makes it different enough anyways.
You're not thinking like a DM.
No DM who is actually good is going to try and outright screw you, but Wish is the one spell (well, Miracle also) that if unchecked can 100% break the game as designed by the DM.

Yes, a good DM will. It is outside the bounds of the rules, and is an idiotic idea. Next are you going to claim a DM should DEX away a prismatic wall just becuase a player is stupid and faceplants into it?
If you are trying to break the game with wish (and an advanced dragon cohort for an 11th level character is a game-breaker) than you are a greedy player, not a clever player, and the DM is entirely within his or her right to stop you. Now I am well aware that there are some subpar DM's out there, but assuming a decent one, what I said holds.

...And you really don't understand what Wish does. One should really know the rules before posting about them.
I'd have to disagree with the sentiment that I didn't "think like a DM". A DM should know how the spell works in all of it's capacity. Nowhere did I say aging a dragon wasn't a game breaker, but that EA's interpretation of how it works was wrong as he is essentially saying that the spell will always go wrong if used for anything but it's explicitly listed effects. As a matter of fact if you re-read my post it essentially says that outside of it's explicitly listed effects anything that comes from a wish is up to DM arbitration, which (at least in my opinion) is exactly how a DM should view a questionable action in a game.

Because it will. Because those are the rules. The rules are something a good DM should respect.
Customer Disservice of the House of Trolls Resident Secretly Ron Paul God of Spite and Sloth
Bestow Curse actually can't do that and it would be stupid to think that it could. The text of Bestow Curse makes no such mention of a usage to artificially age the poor bastard that it gets cast on, though it leaves itself open to curses which "are no more powerful than those described above, and the DM has final say on the curse's effect,". The only time I've seen ANYTHING that artificially ages characters in D&D are the AD&D versions spells that in 3.5 cost Experience Points.

As far as effects that can turn a young dragon into an older one, the only such effect that I've been able to find is Draconic Polymorph and it ilk in the Polymorph sub-school. Since those can turn ANYONE into an older dragon, it's not of very much help in this case.
Just to point something out... The writers intentionally took all aging effects out of the game for 3.5, that used to be present in AD&D. Didn't you notice? Ghosts don't age you anymore. There are no potions of longevity or elixers of youth. The writers realized that it's pointless to try and "scare" characters with aging. So this whole conversation is moot.

I was inspired by an old movie named "Warlock" to make an aging spell for an arcane caster once. I had to change it into more 3.5 terms, because tho it made for a good movie plot twist (she was aging 20 years every day or something), it doesn't have the same effect in a game.

I'll post the spell, just for the heck of it, but I don't want or need any PEACH about it.

 

Death Wish Lv 9 necromancy, short range, target: one creature, duration: permanent, will negates, spell resistance (yes). Material Component: a pinch of powdered autumn-red oak, yew, or ash leaves. –9 penalty on attack rolls, saves, ability checks, and skill checks. Limited Wish or Greater Restoration has a chance to remove the curse exactly as if the caster were attempting a Greater Dispel Magic (DC=11+caster level {=34 for Valcray}); Wish or Miracle will remove the curse.



Blood red leaves, gift from earth,
Birth to death and death to birth,
Keep all boon fortune far away,
Day to night and night to day.”

Bestow Curse actually can't do that and it would be stupid to think that it could. The text of Bestow Curse makes no such mention of a usage to artificially age the poor bastard that it gets cast on, though it leaves itself open to curses which "are no more powerful than those described above, and the DM has final say on the curse's effect,".

For a typical humanoid, a curse that imposed a small penalty to ability scores by aging the target would be very reasonable compared to the -6 to a single ability score that bestow curse allows as a standard option.  Likewise, greater bestow curse could reasonably age someone from adult to old, or old to venerable (for a -3 penalty to Str/Dex/Con, in either case) since it normally allows a -6 penalty to two ability scores.

But while those effects are not any more powerful than the standard curses on your average humanoid, it's rather more beneficial when you age a true dragon.  Should the DM actually allow it, you'd expect there to be some horrible side-effect.  It is technically a way to age a dragon, but unlike wish, it's essentially required that it be bad for the target overall (since it's a curse, not a blessing).

For example, a curse might make the dragon older and more powerful, but extremely clumsy and foolish (very undesirable qualities in an intelligent and willful mount).

The kraken stirs. And ten billion sushi dinners cry out for vengeance. - Good Omens

Co-Author of the Dreamfane, Euralden Eye, Gajuisan Crawler, Gruesome Lurker, Fulminating Crab, Ironglass Rose, Sheengrass Swarm, Spryjack, Usunag, and Warp Drifter, and author of the Magmal Horror from Force of Nature.

My most popular campaign item; for all your adventuring convenience.
Zauber's Mutable Rod: This rod has a number of useful functions that make it easier to live in the wilderness. It is made of polished wood, with five studlike buttons on one end. Each button produces a different effect when pressed. Unless otherwise noted, the rod’s functions have no limit on the number of times they can be employed. When button 1 is pressed, one end of the rod produces a small flame, equivalent to a candle. When button 2 is pressed, the rod unfolds into a two-person tent, complete with bedrolls and warm blankets. When button 3 is pressed, the rod becomes a one-handed hammer, suitable for pounding pitons into a wall. When button 4 is pressed, the rod becomes a sturdy iron spade. When button 5 is pressed, the rod becomes a wooden bucket able to hold 2 gallons of liquid. Once per day, it can be commanded to fill with fresh water. If the rod is seriously damaged or broken in any of its alternate forms (button 2, 3, 4, or 5), it reverts to its basic rod form and cannot be activated for 24 hours. Moderate conjuration; CL 9th; Craft Rod, minor creation; Price 375 gp; Weight 2 lb.
Actually, that also raises the point that if the player is using the rules for a dragon cohort, wishing it up in age category could actually make the dragon ineligible as a cohort depending on the players leadership score. ....


(3.5 rules) I guess no one is paying attention but unless I'm missing a LARGE number of added rules a YOUNG Green Dragon is already "ineligible" as a cohort.  A cohort can't be higher level then you are and that young dragon counts as a 16th-level character which is at least SIX levels higher then an 11th-level character should have as a cohort.

Now that I looked it up the DotF I see it does say that a young green could be a cohort for a 9th-level character.  Of course that is for 3e and was a MAJOR change when updated to 3.5 as it is just too powerful as printed in DotF.
A Very Young Green dragon would be eCL 13 which is still a touch higher then an 11th-level character should be able to recruit normally.  The Young Green is eCL 16 as both share the same +5 LA.

I'm guessing a big problem here is that most of us are thinking in 3.5 terms which came around to balance some of 3.0's major faults.  In Defenders of the Faith (pg 15) there is a chart showing Dragon Cohorts and there it lists a Green Dragon (young) as equivalent to a 9th-level character.  Using that completely IGNORES the years of experience that followed before 3.5 came out and more specific rules for dragon followered in the Draconomicon. 
A Very Young Green dragon would be eCL 13 which is still a touch higher then an 11th-level character should be able to recruit normally.  The Young Green is eCL 16 as both share the same +5 LA.

I'm guessing a big problem here is that most of us are thinking in 3.5 terms which came around to balance some of 3.0's major faults.  In Defenders of the Faith (pg 15) there is a chart showing Dragon Cohorts and there it lists a Green Dragon (young) as equivalent to a 9th-level character.  Using that completely IGNORES the years of experience that followed before 3.5 came out and more specific rules for dragon followered in the Draconomicon. 



Actually there is a feat in Draconomicon called dragon cohort (which I referenced earlier, although in a bit of a cut and dry sort of way, sorry for that) which treats the ECL of a dragon as 3 lower than normal for leadership purposes. If the OP is using that feat, that would put a very young green dragon at an ECL of 10, which would work if they had improved leadership (once again, assuming that a DM allowed the feat to apply to Dragon Cohort which just gives a cohort, and no followers).

I've always found that having dragons as cohorts complicates the hell out of things for this very reason. A player wants to keep the in game relationship with the dragon going, but also wants the dragon to adequately scale in power which won happen unless your story takes place over hundreds of years allowing the dragon to age, or unless you allow the dragon to magically age.  It can be such a headache, and usually I just tell the player that if they stick with the same veriaty of dragon and role play a scenario for me that they befriend or strike a deal with an older dragon who offers the aid of his children, the more the player accomplishes (Read: levels up) the more powerful a child he will send to his aid well the younger dragon goes home benefiting form some real world experience.

Thankfully the issue of a dragon cohort rarely comes up in my games anymore since I moved and have a more inexperienced group. Though I'm sure the issue will rear it's head in a year or so after they get some experience under their belt.
Actually there is a feat in Draconomicon called dragon cohort (which I referenced earlier, although in a bit of a cut and dry sort of way, sorry for that) which treats the ECL of a dragon as 3 lower than normal for leadership purposes. If the OP is using that feat, that would put a very young green dragon at an ECL of 10, which would work if they had improved leadership (once again, assuming that a DM allowed the feat to apply to Dragon Cohort which just gives a cohort, and no followers).

The feat you need there is Improved Cohort, which makes your cohort's maximum level one lower than your own level, rather than two.

The kraken stirs. And ten billion sushi dinners cry out for vengeance. - Good Omens

Co-Author of the Dreamfane, Euralden Eye, Gajuisan Crawler, Gruesome Lurker, Fulminating Crab, Ironglass Rose, Sheengrass Swarm, Spryjack, Usunag, and Warp Drifter, and author of the Magmal Horror from Force of Nature.

My most popular campaign item; for all your adventuring convenience.
Zauber's Mutable Rod: This rod has a number of useful functions that make it easier to live in the wilderness. It is made of polished wood, with five studlike buttons on one end. Each button produces a different effect when pressed. Unless otherwise noted, the rod’s functions have no limit on the number of times they can be employed. When button 1 is pressed, one end of the rod produces a small flame, equivalent to a candle. When button 2 is pressed, the rod unfolds into a two-person tent, complete with bedrolls and warm blankets. When button 3 is pressed, the rod becomes a one-handed hammer, suitable for pounding pitons into a wall. When button 4 is pressed, the rod becomes a sturdy iron spade. When button 5 is pressed, the rod becomes a wooden bucket able to hold 2 gallons of liquid. Once per day, it can be commanded to fill with fresh water. If the rod is seriously damaged or broken in any of its alternate forms (button 2, 3, 4, or 5), it reverts to its basic rod form and cannot be activated for 24 hours. Moderate conjuration; CL 9th; Craft Rod, minor creation; Price 375 gp; Weight 2 lb.
Actually there is a feat in Draconomicon called dragon cohort (which I referenced earlier, although in a bit of a cut and dry sort of way, sorry for that) which treats the ECL of a dragon as 3 lower than normal for leadership purposes. If the OP is using that feat, that would put a very young green dragon at an ECL of 10, which would work if they had improved leadership (once again, assuming that a DM allowed the feat to apply to Dragon Cohort which just gives a cohort, and no followers).

The feat you need there is Improved Cohort, which makes your cohort's maximum level one lower than your own level, rather than two.



My bad. I always do that with improved leadership and improved cohort. >.<
My bad. I always do that with improved leadership and improved cohort. >.<

I'm not really familiar with Improved Leadership myself, but from what I've heard of it, it only improves the leadership score, right?

I should note that because it's a leader feat, Improved Cohort also gives a +1 bonus to your leadership score.

Though since the character in question is 11th-level, and would be taking Dragon Cohort at 9th level (its prerequisite character level), they wouldn't also be able to take Improved Cohort, even if the DM allowed Dragon Cohort to substitute for Leadership, or if the character also had Leadership.  So under 3.5 rules, it wouldn't really work, anyway.

Hmm, I should consider adding Dragon Cohort to my campaign list of substitute feats.

The kraken stirs. And ten billion sushi dinners cry out for vengeance. - Good Omens

Co-Author of the Dreamfane, Euralden Eye, Gajuisan Crawler, Gruesome Lurker, Fulminating Crab, Ironglass Rose, Sheengrass Swarm, Spryjack, Usunag, and Warp Drifter, and author of the Magmal Horror from Force of Nature.

My most popular campaign item; for all your adventuring convenience.
Zauber's Mutable Rod: This rod has a number of useful functions that make it easier to live in the wilderness. It is made of polished wood, with five studlike buttons on one end. Each button produces a different effect when pressed. Unless otherwise noted, the rod’s functions have no limit on the number of times they can be employed. When button 1 is pressed, one end of the rod produces a small flame, equivalent to a candle. When button 2 is pressed, the rod unfolds into a two-person tent, complete with bedrolls and warm blankets. When button 3 is pressed, the rod becomes a one-handed hammer, suitable for pounding pitons into a wall. When button 4 is pressed, the rod becomes a sturdy iron spade. When button 5 is pressed, the rod becomes a wooden bucket able to hold 2 gallons of liquid. Once per day, it can be commanded to fill with fresh water. If the rod is seriously damaged or broken in any of its alternate forms (button 2, 3, 4, or 5), it reverts to its basic rod form and cannot be activated for 24 hours. Moderate conjuration; CL 9th; Craft Rod, minor creation; Price 375 gp; Weight 2 lb.
My bad. I always do that with improved leadership and improved cohort. >.<

I'm not really familiar with Improved Leadership myself, but from what I've heard of it, it only improves the leadership score, right?

I should note that because it's a leader feat, Improved Cohort also gives a +1 bonus to your leadership score.

Though since the character in question is 11th-level, and would be taking Dragon Cohort at 9th level (its prerequisite character level), they wouldn't also be able to take Improved Cohort, even if the DM allowed Dragon Cohort to substitute for Leadership, or if the character also had Leadership.  So under 3.5 rules, it wouldn't really work, anyway.

Hmm, I should consider adding Dragon Cohort to my campaign list of substitute feats.



Actually what the feat does is increase the allowed ECL of a cohort by one, effectively meaning if your a 6th level character with leadership you could have a 5th level cohort instead of a 4th level cohort (assuming your leadership score is high enough to attract a level 5 cohort). As for the improved leadership, I think I goofed againa and just made that up well thinking of extra followers (though there may be an improved leadership feat drifting around somehwere). It's just been a wile since I delt with leadership and followers in general. Anyway,  I forgot that you needed to be 9th level for the Dragon Cohort feat though (as for improved cohort I simply allow it to effect all the variants of leadership such as undead leadership and dragon cohort), so ya, there really isn't any way the OP could even have a very young green dragon as a cohort apparently.

Which begs a question for the OP: was the dragon gained as a cohort via a feat, or is it simply an NPC under the OP's control? if the latter is the case I would probably suggest not trying any aging shenanigans with the dragon as the DM would be libel to try and srew you over for abusing a nice "gift" as it where int he form of a cohort that is far more powerful than anything you should already have as a follower. If the former, then you must have made a clerical error in what your allowed as listed in the books.
Actually what the feat does is increase the allowed ECL of a cohort by one, effectively meaning if your a 6th level character with leadership you could have a 5th level cohort instead of a 4th level cohort (assuming your leadership score is high enough to attract a level 5 cohort).

Improved Cohort does do that, but it also boosts your leadership score by 1.  That's a special effect that applies for all "leader" feats (as defined in Heroes of Battle) in addition to their main benefit.

The kraken stirs. And ten billion sushi dinners cry out for vengeance. - Good Omens

Co-Author of the Dreamfane, Euralden Eye, Gajuisan Crawler, Gruesome Lurker, Fulminating Crab, Ironglass Rose, Sheengrass Swarm, Spryjack, Usunag, and Warp Drifter, and author of the Magmal Horror from Force of Nature.

My most popular campaign item; for all your adventuring convenience.
Zauber's Mutable Rod: This rod has a number of useful functions that make it easier to live in the wilderness. It is made of polished wood, with five studlike buttons on one end. Each button produces a different effect when pressed. Unless otherwise noted, the rod’s functions have no limit on the number of times they can be employed. When button 1 is pressed, one end of the rod produces a small flame, equivalent to a candle. When button 2 is pressed, the rod unfolds into a two-person tent, complete with bedrolls and warm blankets. When button 3 is pressed, the rod becomes a one-handed hammer, suitable for pounding pitons into a wall. When button 4 is pressed, the rod becomes a sturdy iron spade. When button 5 is pressed, the rod becomes a wooden bucket able to hold 2 gallons of liquid. Once per day, it can be commanded to fill with fresh water. If the rod is seriously damaged or broken in any of its alternate forms (button 2, 3, 4, or 5), it reverts to its basic rod form and cannot be activated for 24 hours. Moderate conjuration; CL 9th; Craft Rod, minor creation; Price 375 gp; Weight 2 lb.
Actually what the feat does is increase the allowed ECL of a cohort by one, effectively meaning if your a 6th level character with leadership you could have a 5th level cohort instead of a 4th level cohort (assuming your leadership score is high enough to attract a level 5 cohort).

Improved Cohort does do that, but it also boosts your leadership score by 1.  That's a special effect that applies for all "leader" feats (as defined in Heroes of Battle) in addition to their main benefit.



Huh, never noticed that. I'll have to keep a note of that.
@ Lashius and Slagger:  I hope we can all agree that at an 11th level character getting a VERY Young Green Dragon as a cohort is going to require jumping through quite a few hoops which the OP never mentions using.  Never mind the OP was talking about a dragon that was already a category older.  I see a feat for Leadership, another feat to bring the dragon's EL down (I don't believe it automatically included a cohort), and apparently a third feat to bring your maximum cohort level up which is otherwise hard stopped regardless what a character's leadership score is.

As for "adventuring" with a dragon you shouldn't forget that it is an intelligent creature and should be able to take character classes.  Sure most just have "levels" in Dragon (and even a given age category could cover a few HD) but you could add real levels to a dragon if you wanted.
 
Oh certainly, though it sounds like the OP already has the cohort in question, so I assume it was acquired one way or another.

For the feats, it isn't usually possible to have a wizard with the necessary feats under 3.5 rules, but as you already mentioned, they may be using 3.0 rules, where it's entirely possible.
Improved Cohort does do that, but it also boosts your leadership score by 1.  That's a special effect that applies for all "leader" feats (as defined in Heroes of Battle) in addition to their main benefit.

Huh, never noticed that. I'll have to keep a note of that.

Well, it's not exactly a common thing since Heroes of Battle just only four of them, total; I don't know, offhand, if there even are any other leader feats that were official printed, though I wouldn't be at all surprised if there were some more that showed up in Dragon magazine, or tucked away in a campaign book.

The kraken stirs. And ten billion sushi dinners cry out for vengeance. - Good Omens

Co-Author of the Dreamfane, Euralden Eye, Gajuisan Crawler, Gruesome Lurker, Fulminating Crab, Ironglass Rose, Sheengrass Swarm, Spryjack, Usunag, and Warp Drifter, and author of the Magmal Horror from Force of Nature.

My most popular campaign item; for all your adventuring convenience.
Zauber's Mutable Rod: This rod has a number of useful functions that make it easier to live in the wilderness. It is made of polished wood, with five studlike buttons on one end. Each button produces a different effect when pressed. Unless otherwise noted, the rod’s functions have no limit on the number of times they can be employed. When button 1 is pressed, one end of the rod produces a small flame, equivalent to a candle. When button 2 is pressed, the rod unfolds into a two-person tent, complete with bedrolls and warm blankets. When button 3 is pressed, the rod becomes a one-handed hammer, suitable for pounding pitons into a wall. When button 4 is pressed, the rod becomes a sturdy iron spade. When button 5 is pressed, the rod becomes a wooden bucket able to hold 2 gallons of liquid. Once per day, it can be commanded to fill with fresh water. If the rod is seriously damaged or broken in any of its alternate forms (button 2, 3, 4, or 5), it reverts to its basic rod form and cannot be activated for 24 hours. Moderate conjuration; CL 9th; Craft Rod, minor creation; Price 375 gp; Weight 2 lb.
As written, Wish does exactly two things:
1. It lists a rather long and comprehensive list of things it can definately do.
2. It allows greater effects, but specifically states that the intent may be perverted, ergo technically providing the intended effect without the intended intent.

Let's try and explore this from a couple of points:

Proper Role-Playing:
A character who truly understands the Wish spell is unlikley to try and surpass its normal abilities without research and VERY VERY CAREFUL wording. Wish isn't technically a malovelent spell, but if you tried to view it as decision making process, it attempts to produce the effect it is asked to do (outside of the defined effects) in either the simplest possible method, or in a method that is technically, if not necessarily practically, true.
A character who doesn't understand Wish--maybe a peasant who finds a Ring of Three Wishes at the bottom of an old well--is unlikely to understand it, but is also likely to either make a wish within the boundaries of the spell, but still might make a bad choice ("I wish I had 10 million gold pieces!" might teleport him into the lair of the eldest dragon in the land. "partial fulfillment," RAW.)

Meta-Gaming:
The bane of any DM that honestly wants to enforce the "role-playing" in RPG. While a meta-gamer isn't always a malevolent player, most are usually looking to beat the system, at least via min/maxing. A wish in the hands of a habitual meta-gamer is a powerful thing, and some will try and break the system (or at least, your campaign,) or may desire an outcome that would do so anyway.
Even those that don't actively try to meta-game, are going to get googly eyes at the first wish that comes their way, simply because it seems like anything is possible. Those that make hurried choices are likely to wind up meeting point #2 above.

So, here's the ultimate point: Wish can essentially do anything, in a game where most actions are ruled by numbers and RNG. That is why it has a proviso. The last paragraphs of wish realistically break down to:

"Hey, DM. This spell can like, do anything. It's your game, though, so if the guy using it tries to break it. Keep it logical, but nail him to the wall."

It's a rule that specifically says "there is no rule, use your best judgment."

So no, to the OP, to anyone else who disagreed with me, yes, I understand Wish more than I should ever have to. But "may" not being the same as "will" is an irrelevant argument. It's not some d% roll. It's DM's choice, irrefutable. If you know your DM well you should know how much you can get away with. But if you ask for something thaht's OP by the book, yes, you will probably get burned.
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So no, to the OP, to anyone else who disagreed with me, yes, I understand Wish more than I should ever have to. But "may" not being the same as "will" is an irrelevant argument. It's not some d% roll. It's DM's choice, irrefutable. If you know your DM well you should know how much you can get away with. But if you ask for something thaht's OP by the book, yes, you will probably get burned.

I absolutely agree; it technically can work, but you really should expect something about it to go wrong if you're asking for too much (unless your group and DM have fun with that sort of thing).

To summarize my earlier comment, I'd personally allow it to work basically as intended as far as aging the dragon goes (since you could wish for all the money you need to hire an equivalent dragon as a mount), but would leave the player to deal with the more powerful dragon as a hired mount, rather than a loyal cohort.

The kraken stirs. And ten billion sushi dinners cry out for vengeance. - Good Omens

Co-Author of the Dreamfane, Euralden Eye, Gajuisan Crawler, Gruesome Lurker, Fulminating Crab, Ironglass Rose, Sheengrass Swarm, Spryjack, Usunag, and Warp Drifter, and author of the Magmal Horror from Force of Nature.

My most popular campaign item; for all your adventuring convenience.
Zauber's Mutable Rod: This rod has a number of useful functions that make it easier to live in the wilderness. It is made of polished wood, with five studlike buttons on one end. Each button produces a different effect when pressed. Unless otherwise noted, the rod’s functions have no limit on the number of times they can be employed. When button 1 is pressed, one end of the rod produces a small flame, equivalent to a candle. When button 2 is pressed, the rod unfolds into a two-person tent, complete with bedrolls and warm blankets. When button 3 is pressed, the rod becomes a one-handed hammer, suitable for pounding pitons into a wall. When button 4 is pressed, the rod becomes a sturdy iron spade. When button 5 is pressed, the rod becomes a wooden bucket able to hold 2 gallons of liquid. Once per day, it can be commanded to fill with fresh water. If the rod is seriously damaged or broken in any of its alternate forms (button 2, 3, 4, or 5), it reverts to its basic rod form and cannot be activated for 24 hours. Moderate conjuration; CL 9th; Craft Rod, minor creation; Price 375 gp; Weight 2 lb.