If I want to play a low magic campaign in D&D Next what Healer option will there be for the party?

I'm just watching Game of Thrones Season 2 and I think it would make a fun kind of campaign. Would I be able to run a campaign in a gritty low magic setting like Westeros in 5th Edition or will only very specific flavours of high fantasy be covered in 5th Edition?
Khyber is a dark and dangerous place, full of flame and smoke, where ever stranger things lie dormant.
"What healing"?
Herbalist.
Rest.
The end.
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More seriously though, god only knows at this point.
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Just like any game you can add/take out whatever you want to make it match up with what you want as long as the players play along.
Hopefully the "healer" role will not be needed for any group to succeed. If it is required for party success, then I simply suggest not buying 5e.
Hopefully the "healer" role will not be needed for any group to succeed. If it is required for party success, then I simply suggest not buying 5e.



Yeah okay, I guess I'm not welcome in the all inclusive edition, well thanks man.
Khyber is a dark and dangerous place, full of flame and smoke, where ever stranger things lie dormant.
Hopefully the "healer" role will not be needed for any group to succeed. If it is required for party success, then I simply suggest not buying 5e.



Yeah okay, I guess I'm not welcome in the all inclusive edition, well thanks man.

If healers are required for functional gameplay then they aren't really being all inclusive now are they...
Isn't the point of a "gritty low magic" campaign that healing should be sparse and hard to come by?

If what you want is gritty, don't include healing outside the heal skill and natural recovery.

There is a house-rule that I like to aleviate that: once per day, you can benefit from a heal check to patch up wounds, you regain a number of hit points equal to the check result minus 15.  once per day, as putting bandages over previous bandages doesn't help.
Try radiance RPG. A complete D20 game that supports fantasy and steampunk. Download the FREE PDF here: http://www.radiancerpg.com
I would say Warlord, but apparently, Warlord healing is badwrong4efun. Even though it makes narrative sense when you consider how abstract hp are.
In the Game of Thrones game, you sic your bannermen and underhouses at the enemies bannermen and knights. All fights are 1vs1, full heal between. All traps deal 100 HP damage.

Seriously, Westeros is pretty bad for questing as there actually is little quick healing and most "adventuring days" are 1 fight long. You'll have to add a healing module, make healing items plentiful, or focus of the political aspect of the game.

Herbalism/HD or Play the Game.

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For various reasons (including the wonkiness of tiny round numbers), I feel the following refresh rate is ideal:

Basic Healing for Non-Serious Injuries
• 1 hour of rest: fourth of total hit points
• 2 hours of rest: half of total hit points
• 4 hours of rest: total hit points



The above damage is like boxing damage, strictly superficial, namely exhaustion with a bruise and a cut here and there. One can return to maximum hit points and still have a blackeye, bandage around a scrape, and so on, but these minor injuries, like shaving cuts, dont interfere with stamina or normal functioning. It is easy to recharge from this kind of combat.

This refresh rate makes the absence of a healer or of magical healing workable.



Standard can introducing Serious Injuries that occur when going down at 0 hit points. By definition, reaching 0 hit points would mean “grevious wounds” occurred that requires longer to heal.



From this compromise, it is easy to “dial” healing down to old school 1 hp per day, or to new school fourth total per 5 minutes.
Hopefully the "healer" role will not be needed for any group to succeed. If it is required for party success, then I simply suggest not buying 5e.



Yeah okay, I guess I'm not welcome in the all inclusive edition, well thanks man.

If healers are required for functional gameplay then they aren't really being all inclusive now are they...



You are right in principle.  With hp and damage scaled off the map while AC is bounded for people who cant stand missing you cant run a grit setting where fighters survive multiple battles near their max hp. Unless the DM has the monsters play stupid its easy to focus fire the wounded to death without heal bot.
From elsewhere ...



For various reasons (including the wonkiness of tiny round numbers), I feel the following refresh rate is ideal:

Basic Healing for Non-Serious Injuries
• 1 hour of rest: fourth of total hit points
• 2 hours of rest: half of total hit points
• 4 hours of rest: total hit points




And there goes the grit from the low magic setting.


The above damage is like boxing damage, strictly superficial, namely exhaustion with a bruise and a cut here and there. One can return to maximum hit points and still have a blackeye, bandage around a scrape, and so on, but these minor injuries, like shaving cuts, dont interfere with stamina or normal functioning. It is easy to recharge from this kind of combat.




Unless they have suffered a concussion. That’s a pretty common boxing injury that increases your chance of KO, serious brain injury or death.
Unless they have suffered a concussion. That’s a pretty common boxing injury that increases your chance of KO, serious brain injury or death.

Which is a simplification for ease of gameplay. We don't need it to be entirely realistic, as long as it's playable and consistent.

The metagame is not the game.

@Saelorn. Exactly, there needs to be a playable design somewhere between “realistic” and “simple”. Hopefully both as much as possible at the same time.



From elsewhere ...



For various reasons (including the wonkiness of tiny round numbers), I feel the following refresh rate is ideal:

Basic Healing for Non-Serious Injuries
• 1 hour of rest: fourth of total hit points
• 2 hours of rest: half of total hit points
• 4 hours of rest: total hit points


And there goes the grit from the low magic setting.

The above damage is like boxing damage, strictly superficial, namely exhaustion with a bruise and a cut here and there. One can return to maximum hit points and still have a blackeye, bandage around a scrape, and so on, but these minor injuries, like shaving cuts, dont interfere with stamina or normal functioning. It is easy to recharge from this kind of combat.


Unless they have suffered a concussion. That’s a pretty common boxing injury that increases your chance of KO, serious brain injury or death.




“Grit” happens when someone goes down at 0 hit points. At that time, they suffer a serious injury. It requires a longer recovery time.



Also, there is a difference between “fainting” or “knockout”, and going down with serious brain injuries, risking death. The faint and knockout are the “Stun” impairment condition. A modular option can introduce the “Bloodied” condition, when losing half hit points. Game ending mechanics, like Stun and Force Surrender, would only be possible when the target becomes bloodied first. So, a knockout punch is massive damage that blows thru the unbloodied half of hit points, making the target vulnerable to the infliction of a Stun.
@Saelorn. Exactly, there needs to be a playable design somewhere between “realistic” and “simple”. Hopefully both as much as possible at the same time.



“Grit” happens when someone goes down at 0 hit points. At that time, they suffer a serious injury. It requires a longer recovery time.



Also, there is a difference between “fainting” or “knockout”, and going down with serious brain injuries, risking death. The faint and knockout are the “Stun” impairment condition. A modular option can introduce the “Bloodied” condition, when losing half hit points. Game ending mechanics, like Stun and Force Surrender, would only be possible when the target becomes bloodied first. So, a knockout punch is massive damage that blows thru the unbloodied half of hit points, making the target vulnerable to the infliction of a Stun.




Doable if the game wasn’t so damage based at its core and it wasn’t so easy to hit.  It’s still a video game solution in a supposedly gritty setting or mod. You could reflavor your solution for the first 50% of hp instead of 0. If a character has 50hp, 25 could be healed with lest than a days rest and bandages. Unbound AC, add DR and a fighter can survive quite a few battles with short rest and bandages, mix in one magical heal and they can survive more in what is still a low magic setting.

My major point is I dont think you can run a gritty game with characters with 150 hp that get hit 50% of the time lose 100 hp a battle then rest for three hours and do it again.

Personally, I agree with using bloodied from the get go. But I get the vibe the community wants ultra-simple for Basic. So, Im cool with using 0 hp to define the difference between “serious” and “minor”. It keeps the “tone” without extra mechanics.

The Advanced can supply one or more options to finetuning health mechanics: unbloodied (light), bloodied (moderate), downed but stable (serious), downed but dying (critical), longterm injuries, permanent injuries, surges, and so on.

 



I am looking forward to monsters simply fleeing when they realize the tide is turning against them. Also capturing monsters alive. Not everything has to end in death.

With regard to 150 hp monster. Focus fire can quickly bloody the monster to 75 hp or less. Then Stun, Force Surrender, Planar Banish, Hold, Paralyze, Restrain (Grab with rope or chain), or so on, can end the combat, probably on the second round.

If one wanted to hamstring the monster (thus inflict a serious injury), one would need to continue inflicting damage until bringing the monster to 0 hp, who would then reject surrender and fight any restraints. This is “gritty”.
wow so i guess i can get run thru with 5 longswords and rest for 15 min and just regenerate like wolverine
wow so i guess i can get run thru with 5 longswords and rest for 15 min and just regenerate like wolverine


Mike, HP has never been very realistic when viewed as actual physical damage.

There are a great many problems that can be circumvented by players and DMs having a mature discussion about what the game is going to be like before they ever sit down together to play.

 

The answer really does lie in more options, not in confining and segregating certain options.

 

You really shouldn't speak for others.  You can't hear what someone else is saying when you try to put your words in their mouth.

 

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Mecha Pilot's Skill Challenge Emporium.

 

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wow so i guess i can get run thru with 5 longswords and rest for 15 min and just regenerate like wolverine.


Just so you know, what you said above, is the opposite of what anyone else said.

Mike, HP has never been very realistic when viewed as actual physical damage.


 
Yes, but 4E went to far in the other direction, making the game feel like a videogame. One night's sleep and you're perfectly fine? What? That makes it seem as if nobody ever actually really gets hurt, and that's the stuff of videogames and saturday morning cartoons. You're running around dungeons hacking away with swords and getting beaten on by dragons. The chance of your ending up a couple days out of commission shouldn't be beyond the realm of possibility. Older editions had the right idea when you only recovered a handful of hit points per day of bed rest, and could only fully recuperate quickly through magical healing. Being able to fully recover your hit points after eight hours of sleep or having a non-magical "healer" like a Warlord basically cheer you up to max hit points totally destroys verisimilitude. It's a game, yes, but it's a ROLE-PLAYING game. It's supposed to have at least the semblance of reality, otherwise what's the point?
Mike, HP has never been very realistic when viewed as actual physical damage.


 
Yes, but 4E went to far in the other direction, making the game feel like a videogame. One night's sleep and you're perfectly fine? What? That makes it seem as if nobody ever actually really gets hurt, and that's the stuff of videogames and saturday morning cartoons. You're running around dungeons hacking away with swords and getting beaten on by dragons. The chance of your ending up a couple days out of commission shouldn't be beyond the realm of possibility. Older editions had the right idea when you only recovered a handful of hit points per day of bed rest, and could only fully recuperate quickly through magical healing. Being able to fully recover your hit points after eight hours of sleep or having a non-magical "healer" like a Warlord basically cheer you up to max hit points totally destroys verisimilitude. It's a game, yes, but it's a ROLE-PLAYING game. It's supposed to have at least the semblance of reality, otherwise what's the point?



You *do* realize that Hit Points are not necessarily physical damage, right, and thus the loss of hit points in no way obligates the narration of being physically wounded?
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
Mike, HP has never been very realistic when viewed as actual physical damage.


 
Yes, but 4E went to far in the other direction, making the game feel like a videogame. One night's sleep and you're perfectly fine? What? That makes it seem as if nobody ever actually really gets hurt, and that's the stuff of videogames and saturday morning cartoons. You're running around dungeons hacking away with swords and getting beaten on by dragons. The chance of your ending up a couple days out of commission shouldn't be beyond the realm of possibility. Older editions had the right idea when you only recovered a handful of hit points per day of bed rest, and could only fully recuperate quickly through magical healing. Being able to fully recover your hit points after eight hours of sleep or having a non-magical "healer" like a Warlord basically cheer you up to max hit points totally destroys verisimilitude. It's a game, yes, but it's a ROLE-PLAYING game. It's supposed to have at least the semblance of reality, otherwise what's the point?



Given that HPs are abstract and not indicative solely of physical injury, there is just as much justification for a warlord allowing HP recovery as there is for a cure spell doing the same.  This is just one of those things people are going to disagree about, which is why it's great that they plan to give us options in this regard.

There are a great many problems that can be circumvented by players and DMs having a mature discussion about what the game is going to be like before they ever sit down together to play.

 

The answer really does lie in more options, not in confining and segregating certain options.

 

You really shouldn't speak for others.  You can't hear what someone else is saying when you try to put your words in their mouth.

 

Fencing & Swashbuckling as Armor.

D20 Modern Toon PC Race.

Mecha Pilot's Skill Challenge Emporium.

 

Save the breasts.

my point is unless they create a secondary stat like stamina and have it be a buffer to hit points, then they are asking for chaos. if there is no stamina then all hps are physical damage that is how the game has been played till 4th
Mike, HP has never been very realistic when viewed as actual physical damage.


 
Yes, but 4E went to far in the other direction, making the game feel like a videogame. One night's sleep and you're perfectly fine? What? That makes it seem as if nobody ever actually really gets hurt, and that's the stuff of videogames and saturday morning cartoons. You're running around dungeons hacking away with swords and getting beaten on by dragons. The chance of your ending up a couple days out of commission shouldn't be beyond the realm of possibility. Older editions had the right idea when you only recovered a handful of hit points per day of bed rest, and could only fully recuperate quickly through magical healing. Being able to fully recover your hit points after eight hours of sleep or having a non-magical "healer" like a Warlord basically cheer you up to max hit points totally destroys verisimilitude. It's a game, yes, but it's a ROLE-PLAYING game. It's supposed to have at least the semblance of reality, otherwise what's the point?



Given that HPs are abstract and not indicative solely of physical injury, there is just as much justification for a warlord allowing HP recovery as there is for a cure spell doing the same.  This is just one of those things people are going to disagree about, which is why it's great that they plan to give us options in this regard.




Indeed.

I find the Warlord far more believable than 'Hey, omnipotent being that lives in another dimension to whom I'm less than a germ?  Gimme a hand here, will ya?'
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
Yes, in some way HP's are abstract, but when they're treated as entirely being abstract, then nobody's actually getting hurt and there's no feeling of peril. Is that the kind of game you want to play? One where you fight a dragon in a vicious battle... but nobody was actually hurt, and only came out of it with a few scrapes and bruises? That's what happens when you treat HP's as an abstraction. It doesn't feel real. No, you'll never capture reality with hit points, but there has to be some element of actual real damage in there, stuff which you can't simply recover from with a pep talk or a good nights sleep, otherwise the whole thing just seems off.
my point is unless they create a secondary stat like stamina and have it be a buffer to hit points, then they are asking for chaos. if there is no stamina then all hps are physical damage that is how the game has been played till 4th


No, it hasn't.  Based on the way you speak of past editions, I assume you may still have the books around.  Go read what they say HPs actually are.  The do not represent only physical damage.  You can also find the quote floating around here on the forums if you care to search for it.

There are a great many problems that can be circumvented by players and DMs having a mature discussion about what the game is going to be like before they ever sit down together to play.

 

The answer really does lie in more options, not in confining and segregating certain options.

 

You really shouldn't speak for others.  You can't hear what someone else is saying when you try to put your words in their mouth.

 

Fencing & Swashbuckling as Armor.

D20 Modern Toon PC Race.

Mecha Pilot's Skill Challenge Emporium.

 

Save the breasts.

Yes, in some way HP's are abstract, but when they're treated as entirely being abstract, then nobody's actually getting hurt and there's no feeling of peril. Is that the kind of game you want to play? One where you fight a dragon in a vicious battle... but nobody was actually hurt, and only came out of it with a few scrapes and bruises? That's what happens when you treat HP's as an abstraction. It doesn't feel real. No, you'll never capture reality with hit points, but there has to be some element of actual real damage in there, stuff which you can't simply recover from with a pep talk or a good nights sleep, otherwise the whole thing just seems off.


HPs weren't entirely abstract in 4e though.  Spending healing surges out of combat to apply bandages and fantastical salves and ointments seems perfectly reasonable to me.  And 4e certainly had it's fair share of magical healing as well.

There are a great many problems that can be circumvented by players and DMs having a mature discussion about what the game is going to be like before they ever sit down together to play.

 

The answer really does lie in more options, not in confining and segregating certain options.

 

You really shouldn't speak for others.  You can't hear what someone else is saying when you try to put your words in their mouth.

 

Fencing & Swashbuckling as Armor.

D20 Modern Toon PC Race.

Mecha Pilot's Skill Challenge Emporium.

 

Save the breasts.

Indeed.

I find the Warlord far more believable than 'Hey, omnipotent being that lives in another dimension to whom I'm less than a germ?  Gimme a hand here, will ya?'



Really? You think that magical healing is less believable than a guy walking up to you and saying "Hey! Walk off that broken arm and sucking chest wound and let's go. We've got things to do."
Indeed.

I find the Warlord far more believable than 'Hey, omnipotent being that lives in another dimension to whom I'm less than a germ?  Gimme a hand here, will ya?'



Really? You think that magical healing is less believable than a guy walking up to you and saying "Hey! Walk off that broken arm and sucking chest wound and let's go. We've got things to do."


That analysis requires first that your DM described your HP in that way.  I've known several DMs to describe HP loss as little more than minor cuts and shallow gouges until you get down into the lowest part of the HP range.

There are a great many problems that can be circumvented by players and DMs having a mature discussion about what the game is going to be like before they ever sit down together to play.

 

The answer really does lie in more options, not in confining and segregating certain options.

 

You really shouldn't speak for others.  You can't hear what someone else is saying when you try to put your words in their mouth.

 

Fencing & Swashbuckling as Armor.

D20 Modern Toon PC Race.

Mecha Pilot's Skill Challenge Emporium.

 

Save the breasts.

HPs weren't entirely abstract in 4e though.  Spending healing surges out of combat to apply bandages and fantastical salves and ointments seems perfectly reasonable to me.  And 4e certainly had it's fair share of magical healing as well.



I'm perfectly fine with magical healing. That's my point. If you want to be back up on your feat and ready for combat the next day then magical healing should be the requirement for that, because otherwise the human/elf/dwarf/whatever body can NOT stand up to that kind of punishment on a regular basis and, after an eight-hour sleep, be completely ready for the next day. In prior editions you regained something like one hit point per level per day or something similar from natural healing, and THAT made sense. If you were badly mauled in a fight then it took you a while to recuperate to full unless you had some kind of magical healing readily available. What doesn't make sense, however, is for hit points to be so abstracted that you spend two solid weeks crawling through a dungeon without a break, fighting off dozens of orcs, ogres, trolls, bugbears, and so on, and not having received an actual physical injury the whole time, because each blow is just written off as "it just winded you." That sort of thing completely destroys any sense of peril.
 
I played 2E and 3E for years and when I took damage it felt threatening, as if it was something to worry about, but when I played 4E I never had that sense. After all, how bad could it be if, after a good nights sleep, I'd be at full strength even without magical healing?
Indeed.

I find the Warlord far more believable than 'Hey, omnipotent being that lives in another dimension to whom I'm less than a germ?  Gimme a hand here, will ya?'



Really? You think that magical healing is less believable than a guy walking up to you and saying "Hey! Walk off that broken arm and sucking chest wound and let's go. We've got things to do."


That analysis requires first that your DM described your HP in that way.  I've known several DMs to describe HP loss as little more than minor cuts and shallow gouges until you get down into the lowest part of the HP range.




so how much physical damage does a dagger do and how much non physical damage does it do? if you cannot answer that then my point is correct
HPs weren't entirely abstract in 4e though.  Spending healing surges out of combat to apply bandages and fantastical salves and ointments seems perfectly reasonable to me.  And 4e certainly had it's fair share of magical healing as well.



I'm perfectly fine with magical healing. That's my point. If you want to be back up on your feat and ready for combat the next day then magical healing should be the requirement for that, because otherwise the human/elf/dwarf/whatever body can NOT stand up to that kind of punishment on a regular basis and, after an eight-hour sleep, be completely ready for the next day. In prior editions you regained something like one hit point per level per day or something similar from natural healing, and THAT made sense. If you were badly mauled in a fight then it took you a while to recuperate to full unless you had some kind of magical healing readily available. What doesn't make sense, however, is for hit points to be so abstracted that you spend two solid weeks crawling through a dungeon without a break, fighting off dozens of orcs, ogres, trolls, bugbears, and so on, and not having received an actual physical injury the whole time, because each blow is just written off as "it just winded you." That sort of thing completely destroys any sense of peril.
 
I played 2E and 3E for years and when I took damage it felt threatening, as if it was something to worry about, but when I played 4E I never had that sense. After all, how bad could it be if, after a good nights sleep, I'd be at full strength even without magical healing?


And my point is that, unless you want to add more layers of complexity to the HP mechanic, the degree to which it is abstracted is in the control of the DM.  Not that HPs have ever modeled broken limbs very well to begin with.  In 4e, I'd use something more like a disease track for that.

There are a great many problems that can be circumvented by players and DMs having a mature discussion about what the game is going to be like before they ever sit down together to play.

 

The answer really does lie in more options, not in confining and segregating certain options.

 

You really shouldn't speak for others.  You can't hear what someone else is saying when you try to put your words in their mouth.

 

Fencing & Swashbuckling as Armor.

D20 Modern Toon PC Race.

Mecha Pilot's Skill Challenge Emporium.

 

Save the breasts.

Indeed.

I find the Warlord far more believable than 'Hey, omnipotent being that lives in another dimension to whom I'm less than a germ?  Gimme a hand here, will ya?'



Really? You think that magical healing is less believable than a guy walking up to you and saying "Hey! Walk off that broken arm and sucking chest wound and let's go. We've got things to do."



Yes.  This is why divine magic doesn't exist in my games.
It also shows how awesome the PCs are, because through pure self-determination and will, NOT an external source, they keep going.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
That analysis requires first that your DM described your HP in that way. I've known several DMs to describe HP loss as little more than minor cuts and shallow gouges until you get down into the lowest part of the HP range.


 
And that's the problem. Because of the way it's designed under 4E, DM's feel obligated to describe everything as just a miniscule wound. After all, how else can they justify it if you just go to bed for the night and you wake up the next day with full hit points unless all you had were minor bums and bruises? That holds true even when you're reduced to 0 hit points. Even after that, you can still recover to full strength with a good nights sleep. Which brings me back to my original point, which is that it totally destroys verisimilitude. It removes the feeling that adventuring is a risky and dangerous proposition. You fight a dragon, a pit fiend, a giant? Eh, no big deal. The worst you have to worry about is stubbing your toe or some such, which won't even bother you anymore once you get a good nights sleep. 
 
That is NOT a roleplaying game. That's a video game. That's Final Fantasy. You pitch a tent and you're perfectly alright the next day, even without the slightest bit of magical healing (Actually, incorrect. From what I remember not even Final Fantasy is that forgiving). The whole point of playing an RPG is to simulate reality in one way or another. It's to have a feeling that our characters might actually be in peril, to have a sense that if I get to badly beaten up in this battle I might have to spend a few days recovering or find a priest to heal me. If I don't have that sense, then again, why am I even playing when I can be playing a video game instead?
The original post is a simple and legitimate question. It's not about whether one person finds divine healing more "realistic" than martial healing. The question is if 5E will support low magic campaigns--such as Mearls' own Iron Heroes ruleset. Or campaigns--such as Dark Sun--without divine classes. There are lots of people, including myself, who hope 5E provides an alternative to the default divine healing.
That analysis requires first that your DM described your HP in that way. I've known several DMs to describe HP loss as little more than minor cuts and shallow gouges until you get down into the lowest part of the HP range.


 
And that's the problem.



To you.
So, if there is non-magical healing in the game, ban it at your table.  Problem solved.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
Yes.  This is why divine magic doesn't exist in my games.

 
 
Ok. So when my brother broke his ankle I guess I should've just made an impassioned speech and he would've been fine the next day?
That analysis requires first that your DM described your HP in that way. I've known several DMs to describe HP loss as little more than minor cuts and shallow gouges until you get down into the lowest part of the HP range.


 
And that's the problem.



To you.
So, if there is non-magical healing in the game, ban it at your table. Problem solved.



Not just me, given that Pathfinder's stealing quite a large number of players from WotC. That's just one part of the entire ethos that went into 4E that's driven away D&D's customer base, which they're trying to recapture with 5E. If you like it then you can always add it in as an option later, but the core game should make some internal logical sense, and non-magical healing does NOT make any sense.
Indeed.

I find the Warlord far more believable than 'Hey, omnipotent being that lives in another dimension to whom I'm less than a germ?  Gimme a hand here, will ya?'



Really? You think that magical healing is less believable than a guy walking up to you and saying "Hey! Walk off that broken arm and sucking chest wound and let's go. We've got things to do."


That analysis requires first that your DM described your HP in that way.  I've known several DMs to describe HP loss as little more than minor cuts and shallow gouges until you get down into the lowest part of the HP range.



so how much physical damage does a dagger do and how much non physical damage does it do? if you cannot answer that then my point is correct


I can answer the question easily.  The problem is the sheer number of answers available and that each occupies separate positions on a sliding scale of abstractness.

1) the dagger "hit" does no physical damage, but avoiding it expends some of the stamina, luck, or divine favor that protects you more than an ordinary person of your race with your stats.
2) The dagger "hit" does a single point of physical damage, inflicting a minor cut (which is a way of describing it that also makes sense when poison is in play) which may be as little as 1 point of the damage inflicted.
3) The dagger hit is soaked equally by your physical and abstract qualities (i.e. half the damage is physical and half is abstract).
4) The dagger hit does all of its damage as physical damage.  Which makes little sense when the dagger does maximum damage because we're talking about a lethal weapon.  And, according to common sense, maximum damage for a lethal weapon is a lethal blow.

There are a great many problems that can be circumvented by players and DMs having a mature discussion about what the game is going to be like before they ever sit down together to play.

 

The answer really does lie in more options, not in confining and segregating certain options.

 

You really shouldn't speak for others.  You can't hear what someone else is saying when you try to put your words in their mouth.

 

Fencing & Swashbuckling as Armor.

D20 Modern Toon PC Race.

Mecha Pilot's Skill Challenge Emporium.

 

Save the breasts.

lol i like that example you would save tons on health insurance. but i think my example of having 2 sets of "hps" would work better as you would last longer in combat and it would be explanable to the pcs that you took some "damage" thru combat stress and some thru physical damage