What have you done with the Mark of Prophecy?

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Rather famously, the introductory adventure in the ECG introduces a snippet of the Draconic Prophecy: "Five at the brink of desolation stand as one against the tempest's roar." I'm curious how other DMs have spun this into a recurring theme of their campaign.
I guess my question tries to get to the heart of how this prophecy can serve a larger story arc. If the reference is merely to the Day of Mourning the characters witness a round or two after decoding the mark, this kind of flies in the face of prophecy's predictive power (ooh, we knew what would happen 20 seconds before it did!) and its lasting impact (wow, Eberron knew we would fight together for a combat or two).
What makes you think the tempest's roar is a single combat?

Why can't it refer to the machinations of some group that seeks to revive the last war/release the dalkyr/release the raksasha/stir up trouble in Lyrander and screw up the economics of Eberron/whatever that would be akin to a storm? 

Gold is for the mistress, silver for the maid

Copper for the craftsman, cunning at his trade.

"Good!" said the Baron, sitting in his hall,

"But Iron -- Cold Iron -- is master of them all." -Kipling

 

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57019168 wrote:
I am a hero, not a chump.
Oh, I agree that it should stand for more than the immediate events following its discovery and uncoding. Hence my question: In what ways have others spun this simple snippet into a long lasting story arc? How have you expanded upon it? Does the reference to five standing as one refer to the heroes (the text suggests substituting the number of characters in the party to match, so this is the canon reading), or is it a reference to some foe they must face? If the latter, does that make them the tempest's roar? Etc., etc.

It seems likely that thousands of Eberron campaigns began with this humble line of prophecy, yet I've seen little report of how other groups have spun it into a meaningful element of their stories.
Well, I haven't run the ECG starter adventure yet, so I haven't had a reason to work it into a campaign.

Yet. 

Gold is for the mistress, silver for the maid

Copper for the craftsman, cunning at his trade.

"Good!" said the Baron, sitting in his hall,

"But Iron -- Cold Iron -- is master of them all." -Kipling

 

Miss d20 Modern? Take a look at Dias Ex Machina Game's UltraModern 4e!

 

57019168 wrote:
I am a hero, not a chump.