How I'd Fix the Wizard

These are the changes I would make to bring the Wizard up to the level of the other classes.


Ability Adjustment:
+1 to Intelligence, Wisdom, or Charisma.

Class Features
Level 3: Tradition Adept
Level 5: Implement Expertise
Level 7: Knowledge is Power
Level 9: Tradition Expert
Level 11: Scolarly Research
Level 13: Wizard's Presence
Level 15: Overpowering Magic
Level 17: Tradition Master
Level 20: Arcane Overdrive

Spells per Day
Level 18: +1 5th level spell, +1 6th level spell
Level 19: +1 6th level spell, +1 7th level spell
Level 20: +1 7th level spel, +1 8th level spell

Tradition Adept: You gain a benefit associated with your tradition of Wizardry:

Scholarly Wizardry: You gain one additional spell slot if your intelligence modifier is +4 or higher, or two additional spell slots if your intelligence modifier is +5 or higher. These spell slots are of the highest and second highest level you can cast, respectively.

School of Evocation: When you use an evocation cantrip, or an evocation spell up to 3rd level, and that spell deals one of the following types of damage, you may change the damage type dealt by that spell to one of the other types on the list; acid, cold, fire, lightning, poison, or thunder.

School of Illusion: When a creature makes a saving throw against one of your illusion spells, you may choose to impose disadvantage on that creature's saving throw. If you do, you grant advantage to other creatures until the end of your next turn.

Implement Expertise: You may choose an implement (such as a crystal ball or a magic tome) or weapon (such as a staff or dagger) through which you channel your spells. If the object is a weapon you must be proficient in its use. You gain a benefit associated with the type of implement you chose:

Wand: A wand is a small stick or pointing device which can be made of wood, bone, glass, metal, or other more exotic materials. Once when you make a magical attack through a wand and miss every target, you may reroll the attack roll against one target of that attack. This ability refreshes after a short rest.

Staff: A staff is a long, thin cylinder, often made of wood or metal, and usually decorated or embellished in some way. Once when you are hit with an attack while wielding a staff you may make a magical attack and compare the result to the opposing attack roll. If your result is equal to or higher than the opposing attack, you take no damage from the attack. Your magical attack has no other effect. This ability refreshes after an extended rest.

Orb: An orb is a small handheld object, usually spherical in shape, and typically made of crystal, glass, or a similar reflective or translucent substance. Once when you cast a spell through an orb which allows the enemy a saving throw, you may impose disadvantage on the enemy's saving throw. This ability refreshes after an extended rest.

Weapon: Once when you cast a spell through a melee or ranged weapon you may use the range of the weapon in place of the spell's normal range. A ranged attack made through a melee weapon is treated as a melee attack, and vice versa. If the attack produces an area effect, you may exclude yourself from the area. This ability refreshes after an extended rest.


Knowledge is Power: When you cast a spell that deals damage, you may add your Intelligence modifier to the damage roll.

Tradition Expert: You can a benefit associated with your Tradition of Wizardry.

Scholarly Wizardry: Choose one knowledge skill you are trained in. You have advantage to checks using that skill.

School of Evocation: The benefit of Tradition Adept applies to all evocation spells up to 7th level. In addition, if you change a spell's damage type to a type you have resistance against, you gain a +5 bonus to the damage roll.

School of Illusion: You gain training in the sneak skill, and may use your spellcasting bonus in place of your deterity modifier when making sneak skill checks.

Scholarly Research: You gain training in an additional skill from the list given in your Wizardly Knowledge class feature.

Wizard's Presence: Once per day when you make a Bluff, Intimidate, or Persuade skill check, you may add your spellcasting bonus to the result.

Overpowering Magic: Once per day, when you make a magical attack againt an enemy with magic resistance or an enemy with magic resistance makes a saving thow against your spell, you can choose to take take damage equal to your intelligence modifier to pierce its resistance (negating its advantage). If your spell targets multiple enemies with magic resistance, you must choose one of them.

Tradition Master: You gain a benefit associated with your Tradition of Wizardry.

Scholarly Wizardry: Choose one 1st-3rd level spell in your spellbook. That spell refreshes after a short rest, instead of an extended rest.

School of Evocation: Your Tradition Adept feature applies to all evocation spells. In addition, the bonus to damage rolls from your Tradition Expert feature increases to +10.

School of Illusion: When you cast the Invisibility or Mass Invisibility spell, the effect does not end the first time you attack or cast a spell while invisible. In addition, when a creature under the effect of a Mass Invisibility spell attacks or casts a spell, you may use a reaction to prevent the effect from ending on any other creatures affected by the spell.

Arcane Overdrive: Once per day when you cast a spell that deals damage, you may treat all damage dice from that attack as if you had rolled the maximum result. Once the damage has been dealt, you then take damage equal to one quarter of your maximum hit points.

---

Naturally, these specific class features don't have to be added. My point is just that the Wizard should have class features after level one; spell-casting (especially in its currently nerfed form) is just not enough to make this class good enough to stand with the Monk and Barbarian.
I do like many of these suggestions, especially emphasizing the wizard's Knowledge skills and giving the ability to refresh certain low-level spells after short rests. However, I do think class abilities should veer away from being too specific, such as modifying specific spells (Invisibility) or expecting the player to build the character in a certain way (+Cha to Sneak checks).

Another thing to be wary of is piles of minor class abilities. Once per day allowing a spell to be cast with a bonus +10 foot range is simply not interesting or useful enough to warrant a spot on the character sheet (IMHO). Keep in mind not every player will use a tactical grid where the difference of +/- 10 feet will matter. Significant changes, like doubling the range, might be another story...

Anyway, I have read that wizards are much better at higher levels, and the sheer amount of utility spells they get make some things unnecessary. Why get advantage on Knowledge checks if you can consult the gods, add +SpellBonus to bluff if you can charm person, or +Cha to sneak if you can go invisible?

Don't get me wrong: I would like to see more stuff for every class, and the wizard's entry in particular looks a bit bare. (What will they do about prestige/paragon-type classes?) I just think it's worth thinking about these things.
I have faith that they'll be balancing the wizard. Hopefully they bump up all of the damaging spells to at least double what they are now, and add the intelligence modifier to damage.

Unless your campaign starts at level 15 or above, a wizard is a frustrating and useless choice to be stuck with for months on end. 
I do like many of these suggestions, especially emphasizing the wizard's Knowledge skills and giving the ability to refresh certain low-level spells after short rests. However, I do think class abilities should veer away from being too specific, such as modifying specific spells (Invisibility) or expecting the player to build the character in a certain way (+Cha to Sneak checks).

Another thing to be wary of is piles of minor class abilities. Once per day allowing a spell to be cast with a bonus +10 foot range is simply not interesting or useful enough to warrant a spot on the character sheet (IMHO). Keep in mind not every player will use a tactical grid where the difference of +/- 10 feet will matter. Significant changes, like doubling the range, might be another story...

Anyway, I have read that wizards are much better at higher levels, and the sheer amount of utility spells they get make some things unnecessary. Why get advantage on Knowledge checks if you can consult the gods, add +SpellBonus to bluff if you can charm person, or +Cha to sneak if you can go invisible?

Don't get me wrong: I would like to see more stuff for every class, and the wizard's entry in particular looks a bit bare. (What will they do about prestige/paragon-type classes?) I just think it's worth thinking about these things.



I originally had something different for some of those, but I changed it because I thought it might be too good. As for the utility spells making things unnecessary, the intent was to provide more flavorful abilities to make the class scream "I am a wizard" more loudly than just a spell list.

As for an answer to the question, it's always cool to be able to save a spell slot by rising up on a dude and going, "I can liquify your innards with a single gesture, and then incinerate your house and turn your children into kobolds! I would seriously think about telling my buddy with the sword what he wants to know RIGHT now, or spend the last seconds of your life in searing agony!"

Basically, what Gandalf did when Frodo/Bilbo got a little too mouthy.
This is actually really good. I would enjoy playing a Wizard with these features. Particularly Wizard's Presence.
I altered the Implement Expertise thing, but I'm not sure if it's better this way. Anyone have any thoughts?
I like alot of these but I hate how scholar gets an extra slot. It just screams pick me over everything else, honestly. I'd like to see something else for scholar instead of that. However, I enjoy your fixes much much much much more than the WoTc wizard. 
IMAGE(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y152/RockNrollBabe20/Charmed-supernatural-and-charmed_zps8bd4125f.jpg)
I've been playing a Wizard from the latest packet (going back to my D&D roots) and I'm still not convinced that they actually NEED any help.

Between the at-wills (which are great for generating roleplaying and improvised actions) the kick of the Vancian dailies and the utility of rituals I just don't think that the Wizard IS underpowered.

These aren't bad ideas overall, but I think that the extra spell slots (in particular) are certainly not needed.   
100% agree with above post, but for the sake of this argument lets throw out, the wizards advantage over the monk and barbarian in skills, utilility spells and rituals and just get to the brass tax of combat. 

Lets take a look at the class's main stat. Ah yes intelligence. Now if I'm going to try and roleplay a guy with a big ole brain it would seem like at a minimum i should be crafty in my approach to problems ie not fireball fireball fireball the hobgoblins for over 9000 damage like the barbarian/monk would.

What if I say color sprayed the hobgoblins? 18 int, illusion focus, dc 17 wis save for them? Sounds like they fail that save 80% of the time and then will need to roll two 12's (about 20% chance, cutting avg dmg by 1/2) to hit my fighter/barb/monk's 17 ac on their next turn.

2nd level web? Again you'll be catching 40-70% of the mobs while the party laughs with adv on their ranged attacks well out of reach of affected mobs while they struggle their way through with disadv on attacks.

3rd level haste? I'll just double my barb's likelyhood of landing his MDD and god forbid he hits twice and gets to see that rage dmg two times a round.

lvl 4 polymorph? muther f'ing wis save? O yeah remember that rampaging giant we were fighting? Yeah he's a cute little bunny rabbit now, barbarian you got it from here. Sound pretty save or die to me btw.

In conclusion you're not supposed to be solving problems with brute force the way monks and barbs do, you're meant to be the dm's worst nightmare as you turn encounter after encounter on it's head with a few mumbled words and a flick of your wrist. But I digress, all of this talk reminds me of a legendary joke amongst the group i play with. The group half-orc barbarian walks into a bar to pick up a girl. He approaches one of the patrons and makes his charisma check "ugh, i rolled a 5, I failed. Well, thats fine, I make a strength check..." Just like strength is the back up Charisma, Intelligence is the back up strength.
I don't think the OP is calling for a more powerful wizard. Just a wizard that isn't a 100% copy of 3.5 that adds some more flavors to their leveling up process....just like the fighter is more interesting now than in 3.5. Its not about power but innovation so the NEXT wizard is not a PAST wizard while everyone else has moved on
Great initiative. and good implementation
100% agree with above post, but for the sake of this argument lets throw out, the wizards advantage over the monk and barbarian in skills, utilility spells and rituals and just get to the brass tax of combat. 

Lets take a look at the class's main stat. Ah yes intelligence. Now if I'm going to try and roleplay a guy with a big ole brain it would seem like at a minimum i should be crafty in my approach to problems ie not fireball fireball fireball the hobgoblins for over 9000 damage like the barbarian/monk would.

What if I say color sprayed the hobgoblins? 18 int, illusion focus, dc 17 wis save for them? Sounds like they fail that save 80% of the time and then will need to roll two 12's (about 20% chance, cutting avg dmg by 1/2) to hit my fighter/barb/monk's 17 ac on their next turn.

2nd level web? Again you'll be catching 40-70% of the mobs while the party laughs with adv on their ranged attacks well out of reach of affected mobs while they struggle their way through with disadv on attacks.

3rd level haste? I'll just double my barb's likelyhood of landing his MDD and god forbid he hits twice and gets to see that rage dmg two times a round.

lvl 4 polymorph? muther f'ing wis save? O yeah remember that rampaging giant we were fighting? Yeah he's a cute little bunny rabbit now, barbarian you got it from here. Sound pretty save or die to me btw.

In conclusion you're not supposed to be solving problems with brute force the way monks and barbs do, you're meant to be the dm's worst nightmare as you turn encounter after encounter on it's head with a few mumbled words and a flick of your wrist. But I digress, all of this talk reminds me of a legendary joke amongst the group i play with. The group half-orc barbarian walks into a bar to pick up a girl. He approaches one of the patrons and makes his charisma check "ugh, i rolled a 5, I failed. Well, thats fine, I make a strength check..." Just like strength is the back up Charisma, Intelligence is the back up strength.

 

   
Yes...this again. Indeed for a few encounters a day the D&DN wizard, depending heavily on the mobs in question, can turn said encounters on their 'heads' with a few poorly designed spells and a broken races (humans in D&DN) starting intelligence modifier (which you just love to reference as proof positive that the wizard class needs no further improvement).

These spells, which are laughably limited to begin with in terms of creative potential, will quickly be negated by any competent dm because when they work, they do in fact end encounters (which I believe they shouldn't at all, and you seem to be okay with them doing so a few times a day). If the relative power and effect of spells was fixed, than the wizard could be turned into a fun and flavorful class all day long, instead of a win button the dm lets a player occassionaly use to feel like they have outsmarted the d20 combat/saves system.

P.S., the first statement in that rant about wizards being so uber is patently false, but since no time was taken to explain how wizards have these supposed 'skill advantages' over monks or barbs, I won't take the time to point out how they don't; further, the 'utility' spells a wizard currently has really only emulate abilities that the barbarian and rogue can do all day long, which the wizard can only do a few times a day... leaving themselves with cantrips, low attack bonuses, no armor, and useless stats for anything other than crafting or knowledge checks.  

I like many of the OP's suggestions, for nothing more than they add some substance to a class that has had any real depth ripped out of it (especially from 4e) because it can manipulate a game resource that is fundamentaly flawed...the current (3.5ish/5e) wizard spell list (Btw 'implement expertise' was awesome in 4e and should definitely make a return in 5e, so I am glad it is on the OP's list).

Class: Sorcerer/Wizard/Bard...one time Artificer

 

Magic Colors: Red/Blue

I kinda like it. Still would rather just have a pure AD&D vancian tradition with a Harry Potterish wild mage tradition. Also would like to see cantrips and rituals on compeating feat paths.
Since this is a 'how I would fix the wizard' thread:


First: I suggest cantrips and implements that are based upon the type wizard being played that have adaptibility through arcance maneuvers, so they can be used to the effect that a weapon is. These maneuvers would have to be level based, such as attacking more than one enemy at time with a damage dealing cantrip, which would have to have reduced damage per hit, representing the distribution of arcane energy over an area rather than a single point.


Second: A complete revamp of problem spells that create so many hard feelings about the wizard using the only resource that makes it worth playing as a class, magic.

Magic is a tool with many functions, though the more powerful fucntions can be dangerous becuase those functions alter reality, often in an unnatural way.

  Two possible examples could be:

  Haste: should leave the target of the spell exhausted, with no means for regaining their normal economy of action, for as long as the hasted benefit was confered, as well as a consistent hp drain during the spell representing the strain on the targets body from the intense effort. Perhaps even a failed con save mechanic ends the spell early and doubles the exhaustion duration. This spell could only be used on a friendly target, and the target may choose to end the spell whenever it wishes, though if the target begins it's turn with the hasted effect it must make a con save or the above happens.

Polymorph: first the duration should be reduced to a number of rounds based on a 1d4 roll. Second the spell should only be a temporary removal spell that makes unwilling targets that have been polymorphed not be able to be harmed or be forced to take any saves that come as a result of it's new form (such as the new form imposing dire penalties, like turning a land based enemy into a fish which cannot breathe air) or the spell is broken. This becomes even more balanced because enemies 'in the know' can end the spell by attacking their polymorhped ally; however, that attack was still one less attack that the party took. This spell is further limited if the party is facing multiple enemies with AoE attacks that could hit the polymorphed enemy. The spell could have the concentration aspect removed because it is far less powerful now. Finally, once an enemy has been polymorphed it receives increases in saves or immunity against the spell, to prohibit or mitigate chain casting) Perhaps a mass-polymorph with the same features could be a later level spell.


 

Class: Sorcerer/Wizard/Bard...one time Artificer

 

Magic Colors: Red/Blue

Have polymorph, hold person and other currently "save or die by clubbering" spells work like a reverse sancturary on the target. If target is harmed the spell is broken. I agree with that, it makes it much morec tactical when to cast the spell as well. Maybe like sancturary enforce a will save to attack a friendly target... maybe even with a bonus based on how hard you hit?
 Exhausted is a bit rough on haste, though it could work. Will it matter though, as combat is so short anyway? I like the ticking damage idea, maybe 1/level/round to make it  resource loss not only for the caster but for the castee as well.
Have polymorph, hold person and other currently "save or die by clubbering" spells work like a reverse sancturary on the target. If target is harmed the spell is broken. I agree with that, it makes it much morec tactical when to cast the spell as well. Maybe like sancturary enforce a will save to attack a friendly target... maybe even with a bonus based on how hard you hit?
 Exhausted is a bit rough on haste, though it could work. Will it matter though, as combat is so short anyway? I like the ticking damage idea, maybe 1/level/round to make it  resource loss not only for the caster but for the castee as well.




I like it! The will save mechanic that operates like sanctuary is a brilliant idea for polymorph or holdperson. 

Combat duration honestly hadn't crossed my mind when thinking about haste, I have been playing 4e for so long I still haven't adjusted for the faster combat of D&DN. 

The life drain, which should be at least an amount of hp equal to the casters level (perhaps as severe as a hit die per level), altered duration, and the potential loss of a turn while the spell is functioning to go along with the advantages of the spell, might make it far more tactically apporpriate in certain situations, unlike the haste of previous editions, which was tactically appropriate almost all of the time.

In terms of Haste duration, I would say a round per caster level (total of 9), but remove the loss of a turn afterwards if the spell only functions for 4 rounds or less, any more rounds and a con save must be met by the target of the spell at the beginning of their turn or the spell immediately ends and their turn is lost.

Class: Sorcerer/Wizard/Bard...one time Artificer

 

Magic Colors: Red/Blue

I have faith that they'll be balancing the wizard. Hopefully they bump up all of the damaging spells to at least double what they are now, and add the intelligence modifier to damage.

Unless your campaign starts at level 15 or above, a wizard is a frustrating and useless choice to be stuck with for months on end. 



I would rather see them give wizards a +1 per level damage to all spells, or some similar flat bonus such as +5 at 3rd, +10 at fifth or whatever (making cantrips still useful later on)


Have polymorph, hold person and other currently "save or die by clubbering" spells work like a reverse sancturary on the target. If target is harmed the spell is broken.



Isn't it enough that Hold Person allows a save every round now?  They've neutered it quite enough as it is.  Magic should be powerful, dangerous and unbalanced (both in game and mechanically) as it used to be.
The only help the Wizard needs is by taking a hot, rusty spoon to his spells.  The Wizard is perfectly fine otherwise.
Have polymorph, hold person and other currently "save or die by clubbering" spells work like a reverse sancturary on the target. If target is harmed the spell is broken.



Isn't it enough that Hold Person allows a save every round now?  They've neutered it quite enough as it is.  Magic should be powerful, dangerous and unbalanced (both in game and mechanically) as it used to be.



No it isnt enough. Magic should be powerful, dangerous and balanced. Wohoo I love using unsupported statements about how things should be.
The reason I want them to be more like sancturary is because I use them against my players as well. And the chance to save is so low my players die before they can save (just like monsters do) and dont have any strategical thing to do about it... just roll and pray
Have polymorph, hold person and other currently "save or die by clubbering" spells work like a reverse sancturary on the target. If target is harmed the spell is broken.



Isn't it enough that Hold Person allows a save every round now?  They've neutered it quite enough as it is.  Magic should be powerful, dangerous and unbalanced (both in game and mechanically) as it used to be.

they still have Disintegrate, a.k.a "rocks fall enemies die", a.k.a "i blow out this load bearing wall and collapse the ceiling"

"Trying to run gritty gothic horror with 4e is like trying to cut down a tree with a hammer, likewise trying to run heroic fantasy with 1e is like trying to hammer a nail with a chainsaw."

 
 

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