How can I fit into my party?

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I am playing a knight who follows bahamut and I get the feeling my party is going to be into doing some shady stuff that would really go against how I want to roleplay my character. Basically I am looking for advice on how people find in game reasons to go along with a party of lower moral standards.

Example:
We started at level 5 and played 2 sessions. We retrieved an artifact and traded it back for a reward. Now the party wants to steal back the artifact because they feel the person who has it isn't responsible enough to protect it. I agree because it will be fun for my group but really I don't have any good in game reasons for doing so. How can I still feel like I'm playing an honorable knight and also let my rogue buddy rob someone blind or execute a prisoner or something.
Ideas:

The person is more evil than previously believed, rather than merely sub-competant, and the theives discover this when "casing the joint" to put it in modern terms. While your knight knows that they are dishonorable enough to consider tis kind of theft, s/he (pronoun please?) knows that they still care enough about right and wrong not to trick him/her into thinking that somebody is evil just so s/he leaves them alone.

The person's sub-competance got him killed by a more evil person, and now the party has to go after him before he figures out how to make the artifact work.

***

Less that-scene-specifically:

The knight believes in personal honor, but not in shoving it down other people's throats when their methods actually work for them without crossing the line between dishonorable and evil.
Throughout the campaign, the different sides are trying to convince with each other that their own methods would work better for the world in general, while each admits that the other side is basically good, just annoying, and has gotten his own methods to work very well for himself at least, even if they think that somebody who tried to copy the other's methods without knowing what they were doing and why would make things a lot worse than they had to be and their own methods work better in general.

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Odds are, if 4-6 people can't figure out an answer you thought was obvious, you screwed up, not them. - JeffGroves
Which is why a DM should present problems to solve, not solutions to find. -FlatFoot
Why there should be the option to use alignment systems:
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If some people are heavily benefiting from the inclusion of alignment, then it would behoove those that AREN'T to listen up and pay attention to how those benefits are being created and enjoyed, no? -YagamiFire
But equally important would be for those who do enjoy those benefits to entertain the possibility that other people do not value those benefits equally or, possibly, do not see them as benefits in the first place. -wrecan (RIP)
That makes sense. However, it is not fair to continually attack those that benefit for being, somehow, deviant for deriving enjoyment from something that you cannot. Instead, alignment is continually attacked...it is demonized...and those that use it are lumped in with it.

 

I think there is more merit in a situation where someone says "This doesn't work! It's broken!" and the reply is "Actually it works fine for me. Have you considered your approach might be causing it?"

 

than a situation where someone says "I use this system and the way I use it works really well!" and the back and forth is "No! It is a broken bad system!" -YagamiFire

Kudos to you on approaching this in what I consider the best way: You're asking how you can make it work rather than dwelling on why you can't.

That said, I would ask my fellow players out-of-character what they think the solution would be. Check out the "Yes, and..." link in my signature, too. It will show you some techniques on how other players can establish things about your character that add new dimensions in ways you might not have imagined yourself.

No amount of tips, tricks, or gimmicks will ever be better than simply talking directly to your fellow players to resolve your issues.
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You could feel some obligation to them, or have some reason you want to redeem them. 


Alternatively, maybe you shelf the character for this game and play it in a future game. Some concepts just don't work for all games.

"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"                               " As usual, Krusk comments with assuredness, but lacks the clarity and awareness of what he's talking about"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"        "Wow, thank you very much"

"Your advice is the worst"                                                  "I'd recommend no one listed to Krusk's opinions about what games to play"


You could feel some obligation to them, or have some reason you want to redeem them. 


Alternatively, maybe you shelf the character for this game and play it in a future game. Some concepts just don't work for all games.




I too was thinking the redemption route. Your character wants to see his friends survive and succeed and tags along. He uses the oportunities present to offer up morally better choices in hopes that the party will make better decisions, but does not chastise them if they choose differently.
Watch Book of Dark Vile.  See how a lawful good paladin of pelor joins a thoroughly evil adventure party lead by a unscruplus sexy chick And goes about handling himself, hiding his alignment.   Get your motivation from there.  I thought it was well played.  being lawful good does not mean having to directly challenge a party everytime they doing evil, knowing if you do it may be bad for you.  Its not lawful suicide or stupid.  You can make a excuse not to participate in the act, but you don't have to directly challenge your party.  Only motivation you should have is why you are with your party, reason younare running with not so good pc's.  That background story should provide all the motivation you need to justify looking the other way and/or minimally participating in your party's questionable actions, and yet sticking it out with them.  Maybe...the rogue is your brother hehe.
I suppose there's nothing wrong w/ going along w/ the party, if you learn that the person with the artifact is going to use it to harm others potentially.  That's still honorable!
 I would ask my fellow players out-of-character what they think the solution would be. Check out the "Yes, and..." link in my signature, too.



Agreed. Johnstonian cooperative gaming technique would work well here.
yeah, read lawful good alignment phb 19 you go get em sir kinght.

Troll king

I am playing a knight who follows bahamut and I get the feeling my party is going to be into doing some shady stuff that would really go against how I want to roleplay my character. Basically I am looking for advice on how people find in game reasons to go along with a party of lower moral standards.

Example:
We started at level 5 and played 2 sessions. We retrieved an artifact and traded it back for a reward. Now the party wants to steal back the artifact because they feel the person who has it isn't responsible enough to protect it. I agree because it will be fun for my group but really I don't have any good in game reasons for doing so. How can I still feel like I'm playing an honorable knight and also let my rogue buddy rob someone blind or execute a prisoner or something.

As advised, ask your fellow players and DM. If no one comes up with a good idea that can be accommodated, change to another character rather than turning into the party police officer.

You have a healthy disconnect between yourself and your character. You see that what they want to do will be fun, but you don't see how to play your character. It's possible and potentially fun to have a character that is at odds with the other characters, when the players actually get along well. Again, this requires conversation, and negotiation. Maybe your character goes along with it, but vows to teach the other characters a lesson down the road. If you have the buy-in and agreement of the other players, they can even be on the lookout for when that lesson could be taught.

Otherwise, declare that your paladin was given very specific orders about working with this group. He doesn't know why and it's not his place to question, so he goes along, even though he doesn't agree. Something like that.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

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