How Do You Attract New Players to D&D?

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 I was brought in due to a keen interest in fanatasy and I found some old 1st ed D&D books floating around in the early 90's and I also played the Eye of the Beholder game on the Amiga.

 A few months ago one of my players borrowed my 3.0 core books. I was not using them and had not used them since 2003. Anyway I found out on Sunday he has been running games for his sister and her friends want to start playing. He asked how many is to many as apparently she had 9 friends wanting to play and  had figured out things like hold person targeting will saves.

 I told him 9 people is to many and you probably want to cut that down to 5 or 6 at the most.  Looks like my old 3.0 books bought over 12 years ago may be bringing in some new blood, my 1st D&D books were of similar age as well.

 Fear is the Mind Killer

 

Pizza is very good for attracting players.

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F-111 Interdictor Long (200+ squares) distance ally teleporter. With some warlord stuff. Broken in a plot way, not a power way.

Thought Switch Higher level build that grants upto 14 attacks on turn 1. If your allies play along, it's broken.

Elven Critters Crit op with crit generation. 5 of these will end anything. Broken.

King Fisher Optimized net user.  Moderate.

Boominator Fun catch-22 booming blade build with either strong or completely broken damage depending on your reading.

Very Distracting Warlock Lot's of dazing and major penalties to hit. Overpowered.

Pocket Protector Pixie Stealth Knight. Maximizing the defender's aura by being in an ally's/enemy's square.

Yakuza NinjIntimiAdin: Perma-stealth Striker that offers a little protection for ally's, and can intimidate bloodied enemies. Very Strong.

Chargeburgler with cheese Ranged attacks at the end of a charge along with perma-stealth. Solid, could be overpowered if tweaked.

Void Defender Defends giving a penalty to hit anyone but him, then removing himself from play. Can get somewhat broken in epic.

Scry and Die Attacking from around corners, while staying hidden. Moderate to broken, depending on the situation.

Skimisher Fly in, attack, and fly away. Also prevents enemies from coming close. Moderate to Broken depending on the enemy, but shouldn't make the game un-fun, as the rest of your team is at risk, and you have enough weaknesses.

Indestructible Simply won't die, even if you sleep though combat.  One of THE most abusive character in 4e.

Sir Robin (Bravely Charge Away) He automatically slows and pushes an enemy (5 squares), while charging away. Hard to rate it's power level, since it's terrain dependent.

Death's Gatekeeper A fun twist on a healic, making your party "unkillable". Overpowered to Broken, but shouldn't actually make the game un-fun, just TPK proof.

Death's Gatekeeper mk2, (Stealth Edition) Make your party "unkillable", and you hidden, while doing solid damage. Stronger then the above, but also easier for a DM to shut down. Broken, until your DM get's enough of it.

Domination and Death Dominate everything then kill them quickly. Only works @ 30, but is broken multiple ways.

Battlemind Mc Prone-Daze Protecting your allies by keeping enemies away. Quite powerful.

The Retaliator Getting hit deals more damage to the enemy then you receive yourself, and you can take plenty of hits. Heavy item dependency, Broken.

Dead Kobold Transit Teleports 98 squares a turn, and can bring someone along for the ride. Not fully built, so i can't judge the power.

Psilent Guardian Protect your allies, while being invisible. Overpowered, possibly broken.

Rune of Vengance Do lot's of damage while boosting your teams. Strong to slightly overpowered.

Charedent BarrageA charging ardent. Fine in a normal team, overpowered if there are 2 together, and easily broken in teams of 5.

Super Knight A tough, sticky, high damage knight. Strong.

Super Duper Knight Basically the same as super knight with items, making it far more broken.

Mora, the unkillable avenger Solid damage, while being neigh indestuctable. Overpowered, but not broken.

Swordburst Maximus At-Will Close Burst 3 that slide and prones. Protects allies with off actions. Strong, possibly over powered with the right party.


 I was brought in due to a keen interest in fanatasy and I found some old 1st ed D&D books floating around in the early 90's and I also played the Eye of the Beholder game on the Amiga.

 A few months ago one of my players borrowed my 3.0 core books. I was not using them and had not used them since 2003. Anyway I found out on Sunday he has been running games for his sister and her friends want to start playing. He asked how many is to many as apparently she had 9 friends wanting to play and  had figured out things like hold person targeting will saves.

 I told him 9 people is to many and you probably want to cut that down to 5 or 6 at the most.  Looks like my old 3.0 books bought over 12 years ago may be bringing in some new blood, my 1st D&D books were of similar age as well.


D&D is primarily an oral tradition, in my experience. Very few people see the books at the store and simply decide to buy them without ever having played before. Instead, new players are brought in when they are brought into existing groups. 

I have personally introduced many people to the game, and those people have gone on to introduce other people. Word of mouth is powerful. The best marketing for D&D is a solid game that people want to play, because the more the veterans want to play, the more likely they are to bring in new players.
"So shall it be! Dear-bought those songs shall be be accounted, and yet shall be well-bought. For the price could be no other. Thus even as Eru spoke to us shall beauty not before conceived be brought into Eä, and evil yet be good to have been." - Manwë, High King of the Valar
Friends taught me, I taught other friends, they taught other friends, my gaming group taught our children who taught their friends, and now those kids are teaching their kids. It really is handed down through oral tradition. Oh, there are undoubtedly those who learned from the books, but I bet it spreads fastest when you have a "yeast" player/DM who gets everything going.

In memory of wrecan and his Unearthed Wrecana.

D&D is primarily an oral tradition, in my experience. Very few people see the books at the store and simply decide to buy them without ever having played before. Instead, new players are brought in when they are brought into existing groups. 

I have personally introduced many people to the game, and those people have gone on to introduce other people. Word of mouth is powerful. The best marketing for D&D is a solid game that people want to play, because the more the veterans want to play, the more likely they are to bring in new players.

This.

"I want 'punch magic in the face' to be a maneuver." -- wrecan

I began in the early 1980's by reading the Endless Quest books which were D&D choose your own adventures. That made me interested and once I reached 12 A friend of mine received the BECMI series for his birthday. We began playing once we read the Red box Basic set and never turned back. Within a year we took on AD&D, 25 years later here I am still in love with D&D and the ttrpg hobby. I have taught several players in that time and played the game with folks from every walk of life. Gamers aren't just spontaniously birthed through attraction to art or books alone. They are introduced by their friends and loved ones. This hobby is a pastime for me and mine.
I was taking stock of my bookshelves last night and the titles on it read like a RPG history lesson.
34 years of books, 25 year old characters and Campaign worlds, From Mystara to Planescape, to the Original Forgotten realms AD&D release. For me this game is a legacy, which is why I passed it on to my son.  Iv'e spent over half of my life playing Dungeons and Dragons. Every time we sit down to play I find myself exclaiming "I love this game".
Word of mouth and cautious recruitment of new acquaintances has always been how I have approached it (in fact the widespread use of that approach may have a hand in why some milk-sops think gamers are a cult, but that's a subject for another day and thread).  This used to work out quite well for me, but in the past decade or so, i have seen a decline in new blood for my group.  This is not a flaw in the method most likely, just another symptom of the rat race I find myself in personally (I have always been our biggest recruiter).  Nowadays our new players are mostly the established player's children and nephews/nieces, and rarely college students my sister meets through her job (she works at a local university). 
We need to have a video game that comes out before the table top game. The video game should contain software that instructs the player on how to start a table top game and it should contain tools to track the game and generate characters.

My D&D5E JavaScript Roll Tracker http://dnd5.weebly.com/

the video game idea isnt that viable with costs involved however your friendly local game store if sponsored to teach like how they do with magic would be a perfect fit. find people that play, learn how to play for free go home after buying books and come back to play and support the hobby
Build a better game.  It must compete with current video games so it must be exciting and fun for young people. A tabletop game can compete with video games by offering greater creativity, originality, more player participation, greater ingenuity, and easy customization.

If D&D only offers cookie cutter characters and soulless adventures with little story or imagination, it will fail to compete with video games.  Adventures should be facilitated with videos, pictures, soundtracks, audiovisual aides, etc.  

Rules should allow imaginative solutions to problems and be easy and intuitive.  Complex rules which slow play and stifle creativity need to be avoided.
however in alot of games i play complex rules add to the game and while slowing combat for some may be bad for other groups a little slowness for more realism or other bonus is ok
D&D is primarily an oral tradition, in my experience. Very few people see the books at the store and simply decide to buy them without ever having played before. Instead, new players are brought in when they are brought into existing groups. 

I have personally introduced many people to the game, and those people have gone on to introduce other people. Word of mouth is powerful. The best marketing for D&D is a solid game that people want to play, because the more the veterans want to play, the more likely they are to bring in new players.

This.

I'm going to go with this.

I was taught by an uncle; I was the "yeast" cell in my small midwestern town.

Gaming stores are a mixed bag - I find that few people that aren't already in the hobby go into one (unless they are there with a friend that is). They are often small, out-of-the-way, and let's face it - some of the clientele that go there can turn some people off to the hobby (just as much as some of the clientele there can really encourage already-existing interest).

I cannot think of a way of reaching those rare people that are like "I don't know anybody that plays, I'm interested by I don't know how and I don't know anybody who can teach me". They are normally only on the fringe of interest and not particularly willing to spend much effort to getting into the hobby (in my experience). They're ripe for the picking if you're a GM looking for more players tho.

This is one instance where I think the traditional way - word of mouth, shown by example, etc - is honestly the best way for this game to be learned by a "new generation".

Supporting an edition you like does not make you an edition warrior. Demanding that everybody else support your edition makes you an edition warrior.

Why do I like 13th Age? Because I like D&D: http://magbonch.wordpress.com/2013/10/16/first-impressions-13th-age/

AzoriusGuildmage- "I think that you simply spent so long playing it, especially in your formative years with the hobby, that you've long since rationalized or houseruled away its oddities, and set it in your mind as the standard for what is and isn't reasonable in an rpg."

however in alot of games i play complex rules add to the game and while slowing combat for some may be bad for other groups a little slowness for more realism or other bonus is ok



Tabletop RPGs cannot compete with computer games on realism. They have to compete on flexibility and imagination, on providing things like a  live GM who can adapt to things outside the programmed parameters. Adding greater complexity for the sake of realism automatically loses to the computer game which can handle that complexity in real-time while keeping track of variables that a human GM struggles with.  

These, in the day when heaven was falling, The hour when earth's foundations fled, Followed their mercenary calling, And took their wages, and are dead. Playing: Legendof Five Rings, The One Ring, Fate Core. Planning: Lords in the Eastern Marches, Runequest in Glorantha. 

Bluenose:

That's a fallacy.  Just because they cannot be as realistic as a video game does not mean that they should ignore realism altogether.  Nor does flexibility and imagination necessarily mean less realism.  There is a happy medium in which a small amount of added complexity can add a lot of realism and a lot of mechanical depth for making the game itself fun (as opposed to the story, which absolutely should take front seat).  We could, for example, reduce everything in the game to "roll a d6, on a 4+, you succeed."  This would have minimal complexity, but would be so unrealistic as to make the game boring AND get in the way of the story.

OP:

Ironically, I think the single biggest thing killing the game right now is encounters.  I have no hard data on this, so it's wild speculation, but that's what I think.  Organized play is a terrible, terrible introduction to the game.  It strips away the best parts of the game: new players don't get to create their own characters, there's no story, there's no control, there's limited interaction, it's not really "hangin' with your friends" because of all the strangers playing too, it's pretty much a board game.  In a home campaign, you can have a lot of fun regardless of the system.  In organized play, the system is all there is to enjoy, and a simple system can't be enjoyable on its own merits (although you can absolutely enjoy playing with it, the rules are giving you space to enjoy everything else not adding to your enjoyment themselves) while a complex one can only be enjoyed once you understand it.  I've met people that wanted to give the game a try, and I had to point them to encounters because I didn't have anything else, but I had to warn them "this is as bad as the game gets.  Use it as an opportunity to meet people who may be running home games and to get your feet wet with the system, not as an indication of what the game is really like."

I think what the game needs is two things.  First, it needs to shake off it's reputation as an esoteric hobby for social outcasts.  I've met so many people - even people who are half-way there themselves playing settlers or even agricola - that feel the need to say "but we're still mainstream, nothing to be afraid of, it's not like we play D&D..."  If it could tap that market, there would be a lot of room to expand.  And then it needs a way to connect new players with experienced DMs.  Gaming with an experienced DM in a home campaign is orders of magnitude above one-shots at the gaming store - you've got more guidance, more flexibility, and more fun.  The tools for this are already out there - meetup.com, penandpaperrpgs.org,... - but somebody needs to point the newbs in the right direction.  
Build better DMs.  DMs are really what keep us taking time to play D&D instead of an MMO.  There's nothing like exploring an interesting character concept, pitting that character against various challanges, seeing that character idea grow into something you care about as if it's a real person.  And it takes a DM to provide the right environment, based upon what you want to do with your character, and to throw in the situations that force you to make decisions that even further flesh out the character in your mind.  Video games, with all their stunning visuals, just don't put you in the same head-space.  Though authors can make you care about the characters in their novels, they're not your characters, so you don't have the same connection.  Your character is a part of you, almost like your child; it needs a sandbox to play in and toys to play with, room to learn and grow and live, and those can only be provided by a DM.

I've played with DMs that run the gambit from the truly horrific (with whom I will never play again, even if it means I never get to RP again) to the truly amazing (who could make even the worst RPG fun), with varying shades of mediocre and competent in between (and I fall into the category of "Barely Competent DM"), and I say, what the world needs now is better DMs.

 I was brought in due to a keen interest in fanatasy and I found some old 1st ed D&D books floating around in the early 90's and I also played the Eye of the Beholder game on the Amiga.

 A few months ago one of my players borrowed my 3.0 core books. I was not using them and had not used them since 2003. Anyway I found out on Sunday he has been running games for his sister and her friends want to start playing. He asked how many is to many as apparently she had 9 friends wanting to play and  had figured out things like hold person targeting will saves.

 I told him 9 people is to many and you probably want to cut that down to 5 or 6 at the most.  Looks like my old 3.0 books bought over 12 years ago may be bringing in some new blood, my 1st D&D books were of similar age as well.

I heartily disagree with this concept. The game is designed for groups of 4-6 and it would be best for novice DMs to stick to that size of a group; but I have personally DMed for a group of 16 players (18 PCs).

The game was focused around a mercenary company (the PCs), with the more experienced player taking the officer positions in the company. We all had fun and it was a game of very happy players. The combat took longer (especially with Initiative being rolled each round in 1st/2nd Edition); but that didn't hamper the group's enjoyment. I used a mix of mass combat (Battle System) rules and standard combat encounters (with more than the typical number of enemies).

The only drawback to that campaign was that having a larger group meant it was more subject to people drifting away (when they graduated and went off to college or had to move due to work relocation). The advantage was that it was easier to dismiss missing player's PCs (they died, went AWOL, were captured, were decomissioned/drummed out, etc.) and insert new player PCs (they were new hires, rescuees, conscripts, etc.).

OP:

Ironically, I think the single biggest thing killing the game right now is encounters.  I have no hard data on this, so it's wild speculation, but that's what I think.  Organized play is a terrible, terrible introduction to the game.  It strips away the best parts of the game: new players don't get to create their own characters, there's no story, there's no control, there's limited interaction, it's not really "hangin' with your friends" because of all the strangers playing too, it's pretty much a board game.  In a home campaign, you can have a lot of fun regardless of the system.  In organized play, the system is all there is to enjoy, and a simple system can't be enjoyable on its own merits (although you can absolutely enjoy playing with it, the rules are giving you space to enjoy everything else not adding to your enjoyment themselves) while a complex one can only be enjoyed once you understand it.  I've met people that wanted to give the game a try, and I had to point them to encounters because I didn't have anything else, but I had to warn them "this is as bad as the game gets.  Use it as an opportunity to meet people who may be running home games and to get your feet wet with the system, not as an indication of what the game is really like."

I agree 100%.

I think what the game needs is two things.  First, it needs to shake off it's reputation as an esoteric hobby for social outcasts.  I've met so many people - even people who are half-way there themselves playing settlers or even agricola - that feel the need to say "but we're still mainstream, nothing to be afraid of, it's not like we play D&D..."  If it could tap that market, there would be a lot of room to expand.  And then it needs a way to connect new players with experienced DMs.  Gaming with an experienced DM in a home campaign is orders of magnitude above one-shots at the gaming store - you've got more guidance, more flexibility, and more fun.  The tools for this are already out there - meetup.com, penandpaperrpgs.org,... - but somebody needs to point the newbs in the right direction.  

I think your second point here is the most important, although the first is valid as well. The problem is: its not just experienced DMs that are needed, they have to be good DMs as well; and they are much harder to come by.

How do we expand the table-top RPG player base? This is something that I've been meditating on for many months. It's not easy because the primary method has always been through personal recruitment and so roleplayers now exist as an exclusionary "culture of initiation." This is a very inefficient means of expansion since, as a demographic, roleplayers are growing older and less involved even in their own hobby. The abundant attitude of "What's wrong with kids these days is their MMO's and FPS's!" isn't helping either. Anyway, here's my prescription to restoring and revitalizing TTRPG's:

  1.  Design better products. Let's be honest, most TTRPG's have terrible designs. We as a community seem to have Stockholm syndrome and/or really low standards for our favorite products. And when I say "design better products," I mean both for the game and the book. The the core books for D&D4e, Fate, and Fantasy Flight's Warhammer RPG all have the level of editting and formatting you'd expect from a professional product. If you can't reach that level of competence then maybe you should rethink your investment.

  2. Run a better business model. You can't keep your products supported and the hobby alive if your company is going out of business. If you have any experience with publishing in this industry you're probably aware of how expensive it is to print game books. It's a geometric cost structure so to make much profit you have to print your books anticipating the total demand for the book. If you undershoot then the book goes out of print and reprinting it costs almost as much as releasing a new book. If you overshoot then you're spending money on production and storage that you're never going to get a return on. This is why Kickstarter and electronic books are so important to RPG's now.

  3. Make your brand more than game books. Roleplaying isn't for everyone, but there are many probably more people that are simply reluctant to start because they don't know enough about it and have no connection to a system or setting. Dragonlance and Baldur's Gate were great ways for newcomers to discover D&D without already having a circle of gaming friends to teach them about the system and setting. The Cyberpunk 2070 video game is probably making a lot more people aware that the Cyberpunk 2020 book even existed. It's just like how DC Comics benefit greatly from the movies, cartoons, and TV shows that introduce their characters and world to people that might otherwise never pick up a comic book.

Answering the OP: I don't. I don't do proselitism and don't actively try to convince poeple to play. However if someone happens to be interested in the game and our group s/he is welcome to attend one of our sessions as spectator. If s/he has already rpg experience and wants to play s/he can either use a NPC or create a 'guest PC'.

If then s/he wants to join the group steadily we have a vote internally, requiring consensus from everyone for admission - Yes: that goes for new girl/boyfriends as well.  

I know this may feel exclusive and unwelcoming, but it actually helps selecting players with real motivation and - hopefully - establish a long term companionship.  
So, as has become the format of explaining origin, then spread...
My older brother had friends who played. He never had interest until he played Baldur's Gate. The gateway d&d game? He let me play the computer game. Taught me AD&D, then 3e came out. I played w/ my high school friends.
In undergrad it was my first year goal to recruit new players. I did. It was pretty easy to find out what people were into (movies, books, anime, theatre, etc.) and then compare it to that thing they liked. Made more than a few converts back in the day.
But, I regret never teaching any of them how to DM. I know. That phrase sounds silly because it's a small mix of prep and improv. However, it intimidated some of them. As far as I know the groups I started dissolved after I moved around some.
Now? I've had terrible luck recruiting new players. It's mostly friends (or friends of friends) who "always wanted to play".
Tl:dr Oral tradition.
"What's stupid is when people decide that X is true - even when it is demonstrable untrue or 100% against what we've said - and run around complaining about that. That's just a breakdown of basic human reasoning." -Mike Mearls
I've pitched it in several ways.  The essential method being the first rule of attracting outsiders to D&D, don't say "D&D" ever!  Stigmas suck, but people often go by them.  So far, I've had a lot of luck with some alumni from the college theatre department, marketing it as a "fun method of exploring character, acting, and storytelling."  In fact, I plan on running either D&D or Cthulhu during some downtime when my film shoot starts up.  That and lending used copies of the D&D video/computer games helps (or pointing them to digital releases a la GameStop)

Crazed undead horror posing as a noble and heroic forum poster!

 

 

Some good pointers for the fellow hobbyist!:

  • KEEP D&D ALIVE, END EDITION WARS!
  • RESPECT PEOPLES' PREFERENCES
  • JUST ENJOY THE GAME!

I attract folks by talking about it. I've been asked about it just by saying "oh can't do Sunday, that's when I play D&D". Often, they then want to know what you do and how it's played and why and is it hard and all sorts.

How Do You Attract New Players to D&D?

The same way Monopoly, Scrabble, Risk, Stratego, and any other game does - you rely on previous generations as your primary source of advertising.
Color me flattered.

LIFE CYCLE OF A RULES THREAD

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Thank_Dog wrote:

2Chlorobutanal wrote:
I think that if you have to argue to convince others about the clarity of something, it's probably not as objectively clear as you think.

No, what it means is that some people just like to be obtuse.

1)  Play D&D in a public venue (besides a gaming store) where people wandering by can see you play.

2)  "Come out" - tell your co-workers (I'm going to assume your friends already know) about your hobby.  Stop hiding it because you don't want to be seen as 'too geeky'.

3)  Read an RPG Book in Public Week:  www.facebook.com/readrpgs

4)  Get your kids started with roleplaying early - while they are impressionable and easy to manipulate.

5)  Watch any of the various TV shows (Community, Big Bang Theory, etc.) that have done D&D episodes -and when it is over, turn to them and innocently say, "That looked like fun.  We should try that sometime."

6)  Wait for WoTC to put out a decent introductory boxed set and give that as a Christmas present (or other gift giving occaision for the non-observers) to everyone on your list.

Carl
2)  "Come out" - tell your co-workers (I'm going to assume your friends already know) about your hobby.  Stop hiding it because you don't want to be seen as 'too geeky'.

Unless, like me, you work at a game publisher.

In memory of wrecan and his Unearthed Wrecana.

2)  "Come out" - tell your co-workers (I'm going to assume your friends already know) about your hobby.  Stop hiding it because you don't want to be seen as 'too geeky'.

Unless, like me, you work at a game publisher.



I need to double check in the Forum Guide, but I think there was a rule about not making people envious that you have a job many of us wish we had.


And if there isn't, I believe there needs to be one!
1)  Play D&D in a public venue (besides a gaming store) where people wandering by can see you play.

2)  "Come out" - tell your co-workers (I'm going to assume your friends already know) about your hobby.  Stop hiding it because you don't want to be seen as 'too geeky'.

3)  Read an RPG Book in Public Week:  www.facebook.com/readrpgs

4)  Get your kids started with roleplaying early - while they are impressionable and easy to manipulate.

5)  Watch any of the various TV shows (Community, Big Bang Theory, etc.) that have done D&D episodes -and when it is over, turn to them and innocently say, "That looked like fun.  We should try that sometime."

6)  Wait for WoTC to put out a decent introductory boxed set and give that as a Christmas present (or other gift giving occaision for the non-observers) to everyone on your list.

Carl



I think though there has to be some intrinsic desire to immerse oneself in the RPG.  It certainly is not for everyone. 

One of my wife's friends loves LOTR and Harry Potter, but she shows no outward desire to actually partake in the world.  That is what I find the hardest.  I tend to only invite people to my games who seem to have an outward desire to actively participate in the genre.

I work with alot of imaginitive people but I could never picture them actually playing an RPG.  I tend to first search for the interest.  If someone demonstrates an interest in fantasy or sci fi genre I might spring it on them.  I could never imagine inviting (CO WORKER A) who is always talking about the superbowl and jersey shore to come explore an RPG.

It is a rather esoteric hobby.

Its probably a better shot to advertise in the genre-common venues rather than a place like work.  A comic Book store is a great place to find fellow RPG'ers.  A hard ware store really isn't.

Unless a player brings in someone new, I need to know a person has at least a slight interest in the genre (Sci fi, Star Wars, Fantasy) before inviting them to try a game.

In the military it worked out well because I would catch someone reading David Eddings or something and invite them to the game.





CAMRA preserves and protects real ale from the homogenization of modern beer production. D&D Grognards are the CAMRA of D&D!
I'm a new player, and play at a local game store.  I started a few months back playing 4th ed. encounters.  It was fun, but lacked some spark that's suppose to make it D&D.  It became too scripted, too much like a shooter game. The opportunity to roleplay was off the table since it was an encounters group.

I think we come out to game, not just for good ole' comradery, but because we need an adventure, an escape into the depths of our imagination.  I'm more interested in exploring character dynamics, motivations and character development.  Sometimes I like to pull the Dragon's tale just to see what might happen.

My game store is currently play-testing the encounters group.  We had a hugh turnout last night.  It was solely based on character development, Q&A's, etc.  I like the homebrew feel that DDN has.  As a new player, it's more welcoming.  I'm hoping the DM will let us make more decisions from a RP perspective.  I'll be very disappointed if I get railroaded again.   

Coming into the game, the D&D community felt like a heavily guarded secret society.  It's difficult to navigate your way into the game--with the version wars, diffrent play styles, along with access to ongoing games.  It was overwhelming at times.  I think that's a glitch DDN will have to address in order for it to be successful.  

The sheer idea of walking into a gamestore, alone, to play a game of D&D, knocks off a good portion of potential players.  Then there's the learning curve, couple that with the amount of reading materials, cost and access to games--and your options become slim.  Now you're left with a niched community of wargamers and RPG'ers.  I'm hoping DDN will start working out some of these misconceptions.  As a new player, I think they're going in the right direction.   

1)  Play D&D in a public venue (besides a gaming store) where people wandering by can see you play.

2)  "Come out" - tell your co-workers (I'm going to assume your friends already know) about your hobby.  Stop hiding it because you don't want to be seen as 'too geeky'.

3)  Read an RPG Book in Public Week:  www.facebook.com/readrpgs

4)  Get your kids started with roleplaying early - while they are impressionable and easy to manipulate.

5)  Watch any of the various TV shows (Community, Big Bang Theory, etc.) that have done D&D episodes -and when it is over, turn to them and innocently say, "That looked like fun.  We should try that sometime."

6)  Wait for WoTC to put out a decent introductory boxed set and give that as a Christmas present (or other gift giving occaision for the non-observers) to everyone on your list.

Carl




I think though there has to be some intrinsic desire to immerse oneself in the RPG.  It certainly is not for everyone. 

One of my wife's friends loves LOTR and Harry Potter, but she shows no outward desire to actually partake in the world.  That is what I find the hardest.  I tend to only invite people to my games who seem to have an outward desire to actively participate in the genre.

I work with alot of imaginitive people but I could never picture them actually playing an RPG.  I tend to first search for the interest.  If someone demonstrates an interest in fantasy or sci fi genre I might spring it on them.  I could never imagine inviting (CO WORKER A) who is always talking about the superbowl and jersey shore to come explore an RPG.

It is a rather esoteric hobby.

Its probably a better shot to advertise in the genre-common venues rather than a place like work.  A comic Book store is a great place to find fellow RPG'ers.  A hard ware store really isn't.

Unless a player brings in someone new, I need to know a person has at least a slight interest in the genre (Sci fi, Star Wars, Fantasy) before inviting them to try a game.

In the military it worked out well because I would catch someone reading David Eddings or something and invite them to the game.









Perhaps.  But I also think that the number of potential gamers is far far far far far larger than the number of actual gamers.  The recent popularity of fantasy and superhero movies - not to mention the far larger audiences for computer rpgs demonstrates that.

Not to mention the millions of former gamers who played when they were younger and gave up the hobby - and only need a little push to get them back into the fold.


Carl
We need to have a video game that comes out before the table top game. The video game should contain software that instructs the player on how to start a table top game and it should contain tools to track the game and generate characters.



This guy is on the right track!

How do you attract new players?  From a business standpoint,  the easiest way to pull in a massive influx of players is a successfull video game.

No small part of Magic the Gathering's recent success is due to the Duel of the Planeswalkers game.  D&D needs another great game to leverage it back into the spotlight.  Not only will it generate revenue on it's own,  it'll also cause lapsed players to jones for a game,  and introduce the game to new players in a less intimidating fashion than a core book would. 

It doesn't need software to instruct the player,  it needs links to tell the player where to find current products and the rereleased .pdfs. 

Of course,  the ideal solution would also include them releasing a VTT as well so that lapsed and/or isolated players become engaged players.

Alternatively,  doing a Drizzt or Dragonlance Chronicles mini-series or set of movies would also do alot of good,  but that's a massive investment and I'm not sure Hasbro is ready for it.           

*snip*

I work with alot of imaginitive people but I could never picture them actually playing an RPG.  I tend to first search for the interest.  If someone demonstrates an interest in fantasy or sci fi genre I might spring it on them.  I could never imagine inviting (CO WORKER A) who is always talking about the superbowl and jersey shore to come explore an RPG.

It is a rather esoteric hobby.

Its probably a better shot to advertise in the genre-common venues rather than a place like work.  A comic Book store is a great place to find fellow RPG'ers.  A hard ware store really isn't.




My last group included a guy who was the type to talk about the Superbowl and Jersey Shore.  He was the power-gamer type, but to each his own, and we had a lot of fun (mostly at his expense) when he kicked in doors he shouldn't have.
Alternatively,  doing a Drizzt or Dragonlance Chronicles mini-series or set of movies would also do alot of good,  but that's a massive investment and I'm not sure Hasbro is ready for it.           

They could always do what Marvel did and license the rights to make a Dragonlance movie or somesuch ro someone like Sony who then makes the film more or less on their own risk. Even if the film didn't get off the ground it'd still be profit for Hasbro since they made their money when the film makers bought the license.

We need to have a video game that comes out before the table top game. The video game should contain software that instructs the player on how to start a table top game and it should contain tools to track the game and generate characters.



This guy is on the right track!

How do you attract new players?  From a business standpoint,  the easiest way to pull in a massive influx of players is a successfull video game.

No small part of Magic the Gathering's recent success is due to the Duel of the Planeswalkers game.  D&D needs another great game to leverage it back into the spotlight.  Not only will it generate revenue on it's own,  it'll also cause lapsed players to jones for a game,  and introduce the game to new players in a less intimidating fashion than a core book would. 

It doesn't need software to instruct the player,  it needs links to tell the player where to find current products and the rereleased .pdfs. 

Of course,  the ideal solution would also include them releasing a VTT as well so that lapsed and/or isolated players become engaged players.

Alternatively,  doing a Drizzt or Dragonlance Chronicles mini-series or set of movies would also do alot of good,  but that's a massive investment and I'm not sure Hasbro is ready for it.           




Some years back a production company (the same people who made Xena I think) were looking into optioning the rights to do a TV series based on Drizz't.  Nothing came of it, unfortunately...


Carl
Every movie I have seen released for D&D was a poor attempt and failure in my book. A cartoon and/or animated movie would be a better route. But then you would have to suffer the associate merchandise as Hasbro would only invest in it to further a line of toys in addition to board games or related material. A series of novels is a solid standby, but I am not sure it holds the same interest these days for young people. It appears books would be a good avenue to keep players interested and to fuel their imagination. But for that matter, just releasing solid adventures series or modules on a reliable release schedule can do wonders.
Every movie I have seen released for D&D was a poor attempt and failure in my book. A cartoon and/or animated movie would be a better route. But then you would have to suffer the associate merchandise as Hasbro would only invest in it to further a line of toys in addition to board games or related material. A series of novels is a solid standby, but I am not sure it holds the same interest these days for young people. It appears books would be a good avenue to keep players interested and to fuel their imagination. But for that matter, just releasing solid adventures series or modules on a reliable release schedule can do wonders.



Hasbro movies I think have been pretty bad.

It is sad when the newer animated Transformer cartoons like TF PRIME are higher quality than the movie.

And if Hasbro views D&D as just a GAME, they might release another movie like BATTLESHIP except call it DUNGEONS and DRAGONS and give it the same level of care. 

CAMRA preserves and protects real ale from the homogenization of modern beer production. D&D Grognards are the CAMRA of D&D!
My boyfriend and my friends taught me. I'd like to get my sister involved with our group but shes not reliable every weekend since she has so many other activities with church and girl scouts. Its okay, I was busy when I was her age too. My bf and I might teach her magic when she comes over though since she loves playing cards. 
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