Wizard's Escape

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Hello, I'm a DM with a rules question. I apologize if it's been answered before, but I didn't find an answer in any search. Thanks in advance for any replies or answers.

 One of my players has the power, "Wizard's Escape". My question is, as an "Immediate Interrupt" after being hit, does the escaping wizard still take the damage before teleporting away? My instinct is "no" because the action was interrupted, but I'd like to play it correctly. I'm sure if the wizard does take the damage, I'm sure my player will be disappoited. Thanks again for any replies.
Right.  Since it's an interrupt, the Wizard teleports away out of range of the attack before actually getting hit, so he doesn't get hit, so he takes no damage.

OD&D, 1E and 2E challenged the player. 3E challenged the character, not the player. Now 4E takes it a step further by challenging a GROUP OF PLAYERS to work together as a TEAM. That's why I love 4E.

"Your ability to summon a horde of celestial superbeings at will is making my ... BMX skills look a bit redundant."

"People treat their lack of imagination as if it's the measure of what's silly. Which is silly." - Noon

"Keep On The Shadowfell" would be hailed as a brilliant, revolutionary triumph in game design if it were followed by the words "A Pathfinder Adventure Path by Paizo."

"Falling down is how you grow.  Staying down is how you die.  It's not what happens to you, it's what you do after it happens.”

Don't feel bad, this exact issue recently came up in one of my games.

Red's answer is spot on.

There are other powers in the game that work similarly.   For example, there's a power that lets a character teleport 3 squares if he is caught in a blast/burst.   If those 3 squares place him outside the blast-zone, he takes no damage.
Thanks for the replies! I fell better that I was reading and playing that power correctly. I'm glad, as an inexperienced DM, that there's a place for me to ask questions about game mechanics. I'm still struggling with my storytelling and roleplaying my NPCs. It all comes together so well in my head, but falls apart from time to time when my players do something unexpected and are staring cow-eyed at me waiting for a response. [:o]
Thanks for the replies! I fell better that I was reading and playing that power correctly. I'm glad, as an inexperienced DM, that there's a place for me to ask questions about game mechanics. I'm still struggling with my storytelling and roleplaying my NPCs. It all comes together so well in my head, but falls apart from time to time when my players do something unexpected and are staring cow-eyed at me waiting for a response. [:o]

It comes with experience and being at ease with the other players.  Don't worry about getting it right every time or doing it perfectly, just focus on doing what you think will create the most fun for the group as a whole.

After 30 years of DMing, I'm still learning new things.  It never stops.  One of the best ways to learn, I've found, is to play with other DMs and learn by watching and asking questions.  

OD&D, 1E and 2E challenged the player. 3E challenged the character, not the player. Now 4E takes it a step further by challenging a GROUP OF PLAYERS to work together as a TEAM. That's why I love 4E.

"Your ability to summon a horde of celestial superbeings at will is making my ... BMX skills look a bit redundant."

"People treat their lack of imagination as if it's the measure of what's silly. Which is silly." - Noon

"Keep On The Shadowfell" would be hailed as a brilliant, revolutionary triumph in game design if it were followed by the words "A Pathfinder Adventure Path by Paizo."

"Falling down is how you grow.  Staying down is how you die.  It's not what happens to you, it's what you do after it happens.”


Jan 29, 2013 -- 2:27PM, DarthMacho wrote:

Thanks for the replies! I fell better that I was reading and playing that power correctly. I'm glad, as an inexperienced DM, that there's a place for me to ask questions about game mechanics. I'm still struggling with my storytelling and roleplaying my NPCs. It all comes together so well in my head, but falls apart from time to time when my players do something unexpected and are staring cow-eyed at me waiting for a response.


It comes with experience and being at ease with the other players.  Don't worry about getting it right every time or doing it perfectly, just focus on doing what you think will create the most fun for the group as a whole.

After 30 years of DMing, I'm still learning new things.  It never stops.  One of the best ways to learn, I've found, is to play with other DMs and learn by watching and asking questions.  



Thank you for the encouragement. I played AD&D 20 years ago, but had not played any other edition until listening to the Critical Hit Podcast, which last year inspired me to try 4e. I'm pretty comfortable with my group, as they consist of my sister, my 19yo nephew, and my 12yo daughter. I think my problem is that I don't pace myself, and I start to rush things like descriptions and plot points. I think once I get some experience, I'll be okay. Thanks again.