Warning : Ki and Chi are not the same things

While Ki is like a burning cauldron, Chi is about breath and length of Breath
Fine.  Replace with "Awesome Points".
Warning: doesn't matter. In game they're merely managleable resources.
And we care ... why?
That's a good point.  It is another example of things not being properly researched during development. 
CAMRA preserves and protects real ale from the homogenization of modern beer production. D&D Grognards are the CAMRA of D&D!
That's a good point.  It is another example of things not being properly researched during development. 



And another example of 'nobody cares and it doesn't matter'.
And we care ... why?



I care because words mean things in the real world.

When people read words that are misused in the media, they mistake the meaning of words in the real world, and then I have to correct them.



CAMRA preserves and protects real ale from the homogenization of modern beer production. D&D Grognards are the CAMRA of D&D!
While Ki is like a burning cauldron, Chi is about breath and length of Breath



Actually, qi, chi and ki (and other derivatives) are all about internal energy.

How that is defined is filtered through the culture that is using the term. While qi may be defined in China as "lasting breath," seen through Japanese eyes (ki), it could well be a cauldron of swelling energy.

The literal translation of the character "qi" is steam, likened to the steam rising from a bowl of rice or from one's breath seen on a cold day.

That's a good point.  It is another example of things not being properly researched during development. 



And another example of 'nobody cares and it doesn't matter'.



Can you offer the a link to the survey where you found this information from please?

Many Thanks!


CAMRA preserves and protects real ale from the homogenization of modern beer production. D&D Grognards are the CAMRA of D&D!
While Ki is like a burning cauldron, Chi is about breath and length of Breath



Actually, qi, chi and ki (and other derivatives) are all about internal energy.

How that is defined is filtered through the culture that is using the term. While qi may be defined in China as "lasting breath," seen through Japanese eyes (ki), it could well be a cauldron of swelling energy.

The literal translation of the character "qi" is steam, likened to the steam rising from a bowl of rice or from one's breath seen on a cold day.




AH thank you!

Nice etymology.

CAMRA preserves and protects real ale from the homogenization of modern beer production. D&D Grognards are the CAMRA of D&D!

to me, ki relates to karate, while Chi would belong to the pape Benoit XVI (is it silly ?? )


   Ki class


10   Brute
 9   Assassin
 8   Monk
 7   Ninja
 6   Samuraï
 5   General
 4   Fighter
 3   Soldier
 2   Rogue
 1   Thief


 Chi class


10   Demon
 9   Priest
 8   Cleric
 7   Paladin
 6   Warlord
 5   Cavalier
 4   English Lord
 3   Drunkard
 2   Peasan
 1   Coward



AH thank you!

Nice etymology.




Well, the real point of my post was to illustrate that the definition can and is filtered through a cultural lens, and even a personal one. To one person, their chi may feel like a rising wind, to another a burning flame and to a third a rushing river.

Ki, as being used by D&D, is a close enough approximation for the purposes of a role-playing game. We can attempt to define all of the possible uses and methods of harnessing chi, but then we would be playing Exalted.

However, having cultural differences for the way Monks in your D&D setting describe and use their qi is a fine bit of flavor, provided it ever comes up for your PCs to discover.

While Ki is like a burning cauldron, Chi is about breath and length of Breath



Actually, qi, chi and ki (and other derivatives) are all about internal energy.

How that is defined is filtered through the culture that is using the term. While qi may be defined in China as "lasting breath," seen through Japanese eyes (ki), it could well be a cauldron of swelling energy.

The literal translation of the character "qi" is steam, likened to the steam rising from a bowl of rice or from one's breath seen on a cold day.




AH thank you!

Nice etymology.



The stream in question is that of life force flowing through the bodies focal centers its why a Monk should be using CON derived/delimited potency. Expressing that energy in a burst outward.. vs a steady ongoing expression might be a differentiation.
  Creative Character Build Collection and The Magic of King's and Heros  also Can Martial Characters Fly? 

Improvisation in 4e: Fave 4E Improvisations - also Wrecans Guides to improvisation beyond page 42
The Non-combatant Adventurer (aka Princess build Warlord or LazyLord)
Reality is unrealistic - and even monkeys protest unfairness
Reflavoring the Fighter : The Wizard : The Swordmage - Creative Character Collection: Bloodwright (Darksun Character) 

At full hit points and still wounded to incapacitation? you are playing 1e.
By virtue of being a player your characters are the protagonists in a heroic fantasy game even at level one
"Wizards and Warriors need abilities with explicit effects for opposite reasons. With the wizard its because you need to create artificial limits on them, they have no natural ones and for the Warrior you need to grant permission to do awesome."

 

Well, the real point of my post was to illustrate that the definition can and is filtered through a cultural lens, and even a personal one. To one person, their chi may feel like a rising wind, to another a burning flame and to a third a rushing river.

Thus, "awesome points" is clearly the best solution.  If it's soooooooo damn inportant to not get the "wrong" (or even slightly different) flavor, just go with no flavor at all.

That's a good point.  It is another example of things not being properly researched during development. 


Personally, I'd prefer they be doing development during development, rather than historical and cultural research.
D&D Next = D&D: Quantum Edition
I'm pretty sure Ki, Chi, Qi, and Xi are all the exact same thing, just alternate spellings for a word that isn't originally from the alphabet that we use. If I'm wrong and there is some difference, and if the differences are then as minor and negligible as described here, then why should anybody care?

Why, yes, as a matter of fact I am the Unfailing Arbiter of All That Is Good Design (Even More So Than The Actual Developers) TM Speaking of things that were badly designed, please check out this thread for my Minotaur fix. What have the critics said, you ask? "If any of my players ask to play a Minotaur, I'm definitely offering this as an alternative to the official version." - EmpactWB "If I ever feel like playing a Minotaur I'll know where to look!" - Undrave "WoTC if you are reading this - please take this guy's advice." - Ferol_Debtor_of_Torm "Really full of win. A minotaur that is actually attractive for more than just melee classes." - Cpt_Micha Also, check out my recent GENASI variant! If you've ever wished that your Fire Genasi could actually set stuff on fire, your Water Genasi could actually swim, or your Wind Genasi could at least glide, then look no further. Finally, check out my OPTIONS FOR EVERYONE article, an effort to give unique support to the races that WotC keeps forgetting about. Includes new racial feature options for the Changeling, Deva, Githzerai, Gnoll, Gnome, Goliath, Half-Orc, Kalashtar, Minotaur, Shadar-Kai, Thri-Kreen, Warforged and more!
I'm pretty sure Ki, Chi, Qi, and Xi are all the exact same thing, just alternate spellings for a word that isn't originally from the alphabet that we use.

Plus also: moxie, grit, gumption, gusto, spunk, and The Force™.
well, if Chi derivates in gentlemania while Ki gives you martial attitude, then there is some difference
Their only real difference is value in Scrabble/Words with Friends.
I'm pretty sure Ki, Chi, Qi, and Xi are all the exact same thing, just alternate spellings for a word that isn't originally from the alphabet that we use.

Plus also: moxie, grit, gumption, gusto, spunk, and The Force™.


"The Force" is a bit more external in connotation ... where as "life force." sounds more neutral on the issue but perhaps the ambiguity is good.
  Creative Character Build Collection and The Magic of King's and Heros  also Can Martial Characters Fly? 

Improvisation in 4e: Fave 4E Improvisations - also Wrecans Guides to improvisation beyond page 42
The Non-combatant Adventurer (aka Princess build Warlord or LazyLord)
Reality is unrealistic - and even monkeys protest unfairness
Reflavoring the Fighter : The Wizard : The Swordmage - Creative Character Collection: Bloodwright (Darksun Character) 

At full hit points and still wounded to incapacitation? you are playing 1e.
By virtue of being a player your characters are the protagonists in a heroic fantasy game even at level one
"Wizards and Warriors need abilities with explicit effects for opposite reasons. With the wizard its because you need to create artificial limits on them, they have no natural ones and for the Warrior you need to grant permission to do awesome."

 

Ki is the Japanese pronunciation of the same character as the Chinese qi/chi. It's a part of many compound words, but it can mean breath, energy, will, attention, health, etc. Its actually a very common word in everyday Japanese. As such it's a perfectly fine term for the monk class to use.
"The Force" is a bit more external in connotation

it did, before Lucas felt the need to explain how it really works.

Seriously, Ki and Chi (Qi) are the same word. Ki is just a Japanese romanji spelling of the Chinese word. If you even looked up the concept or knew anything about the language you'd realize this. Sort of like how in Japanese "saiyin" means saint or immortal but is really just the Chinese word "xian." I can't believe this thread is already over a page long and I'm actually contributing to this wreckage. If you think that Qi isn't for martial artists then I'm not sure how you've missed so much of Chinese popular culture.
If words definitions were pertinent in D&D, Wisdom ability descritption would be pure nonsense.

And a lot of classes wouldn't have the names they have.
I prefer Awesome Sauce thankyou.
Seriously, Ki and Chi (Qi) are the same word. Ki is just a Japanese romanji spelling of the Chinese word. If you even looked up the concept or knew anything about the language you'd realize this. Sort of like how in Japanese "saiyin" means saint or immortal but is really just the Chinese word "xian." I can't believe this thread is already over a page long and I'm actually contributing to this wreckage. If you think that Qi isn't for martial artists then I'm not sure how you've missed so much of Chinese popular culture.



Chi is for Chivalry ( oh! lol )

Ki is for Karate practician 


I have practiced Chinese for a decade now and I know what I'm saying;  


take a look at the two charts with ki ending in the Brute and Chi ending in Demon status; it may look curious that on top of chivalry there's the swift demon but I like it that way.
Almost off-topic: 

Is there any link between (D&D) Ki, Incarnum and Thoon (mindslayer cult from Monster Manual V)?


The chackras (body slots) from "Magic of Incarnum" could be used for ki-power source?  

 * Do Sports leagues and Martial Arts tournaments dopping tests to know athletes´ levels of midi-chlorians?

"Say me what you're showing off for, and I'll say you what you lack!" (Spanish saying)

 

Book 13 Anaclet 23 Confucius said: "The Superior Man is in harmony but does not follow the crowd. The inferior man follows the crowd, but is not in harmony"

 

"In a country well governed, poverty is something to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." - Confucius 

Chi is for Chivalry ( oh! lol )


You're kidding, right?

You're taking an english word derived from old french, and applying that to something in traditional chinese culture?

You're kidding, right?
D&D Next = D&D: Quantum Edition
The troll is strong in this thread.
As the primary purpose of Dungeons and Dragons is entertainment, I would argue that popular culture does and should have a stronger influence than semantical historical nitpicking.

Ki and chi are just different spellings you get from transliterating from a language with a phonemic voiceless palatal stop (such as many Chinese dialects) into a language without one (such as Japanese or English).
As the primary purpose of Dungeons and Dragons is entertainment, I would argue that popular culture does and should have a stronger influence than semantical historical nitpicking.

It can backfire, as vancian wizards or military rogues are not the most popular incarnations of these archetypes, even after years of D&D influence in pop culture.


I have practiced Chinese for a decade now and I know what I'm saying;  



How does one practice Chinese?

I have practiced Chinese for a decade now and I know what I'm saying;  



How does one practice Chinese?



First, you have to talk the talk.  Then, you have to wok the wok.
well, if Chi derivates in gentlemania while Ki gives you martial attitude, then there is some difference



That would be called 'fluff' and should not be a mechanical issue.
As the primary purpose of Dungeons and Dragons is entertainment, I would argue that popular culture does and should have a stronger influence than semantical historical nitpicking.

It can backfire, as vancian wizards or military rogues are not the most popular incarnations of these archetypes, even after years of D&D influence in pop culture.




Personally I think that D&D ought to be more forward looking in the case of magic than clinging to its historical spell slot driven version of vancian magic. 

So far as military rogues go, I would prefer a game that tried to distinguish and balance each of the pillars (combat, exploration and interaction) independantly, and then transparently allowed characters to move focus from one to another.  A default wizard, fighter, rogue or cleric ought to each have a similar impact (with meaningful choices) regardless of whether the party is exploring an unoccupied ruined tomb, deducing the author of a regicidal plot at a royal masquerade or fighting through a nest of drow and their spider-kin to eventually destroy their summoned demonic patron.  Then if a player wants to play a rogue who doesn't fight, allow a trade in of combat potency at increased skill use.  Likewise if the fighter wants to play a grizzled veteran who is worn down by war but well known and respected, he too ought to be able to trade combat potency for efficacy off the battlefield.

The reason I view these two things differently is that I thing game play ought to default to encouraging participation at all times.  D&D isn't a work of fiction with a single author being interpreted be each reader individually.  It is collaborative, and should default to allow for maximum collaboration.
I think the OP & that guy who's always going on about renaming longswords to "arming" swords should get together.....
I think the OP & that guy who's always going on about renaming longswords to "arming" swords should get together.....



I was thinking along similar lines.

Except I thought that the people that dont care should get together.

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This dude's threads are awesome.

Holy shiz. XD
There is no difference between Chinese Chi and Japanese Ki.

Chi talks more about breath control to change states of consciousness and release the body's potential in strength.
Ki talks more about the solar plexus and the energy derived from that breath control.
Both are part of the same system.
The true force is Key.  It opens doors, closes doors and gets you from place to place.  Without it we are more vulnerable to criminals.  With it we keep them prisoner.