Polearm Training Feat

"When you are wielding a glaive, a halberd, or a longspear, the weapon functions as a double weapon that has a second end that deals 1d6 bludgeoning damage."

What does this mean to you, and when/how is it used?

For instance, does it mean that this specialized training allows you to use a glaive as a two-weapon fighter would - attacking once with the axe-head and once with the blunt end? Does it mean that this training allows you to hit things with either the axe end or the blunt end and thus differentiate the damage based upon need? Does it mean that you get an additional attack for free with the blunt end?

"Double" is a weapon property defined in the Equipment PDF. Basically, you're right: it's like using two weapons, so those feats would help. When attacking, you can choose between the sharp head, the blunt head, or both (at a -2 penalty for each roll, and each head would only do 1d6 dmg; feats mitigate the problems).
What veggie sama said except each end end does not only deal 1d6. One end deals normal damage, the other only [w] without any bonuses. For more details consult the two weapon fighting rules
Two Weapon Fighting specifically says that the offhand needs to be light for you to be able to swing with both of them

Polearm Training, nor the rules for Double state that the secondary end is considered light
Two Weapon Fighting specifically says that the offhand needs to be light for you to be able to swing with both of them

Polearm Training, nor the rules for Double state that the secondary end is considered light



I suspect the intent is that the second half count as light for this purpose.   But it is clearly never stated anywhere and without that rule this feat is totally useless.


I'm also not sure what the point of including Quarterstaff on the proficiency list is since a) it is already a double weapon and b) every single class (now and in the likely future) already has proficiency in it.   It also stands out as the only one with reach.  I proposed that the feat make Quarterstaff useable as a reach weapon to fit in with the other parts of the feat.


Carl
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I'm also not sure what the point of including Quarterstaff on the proficiency list is since a) it is already a double weapon and b) every single class (now and in the likely future) already has proficiency in it.   It also stands out as the only one with reach.  I proposed that the feat make Quarterstaff useable as a reach weapon to fit in with the other parts of the feat.


Carl



It only lists Quarterstaff as proficiency, it does not also state that Quarterstaff becomes a double weapon

I suppose its possible a class or 2 wont have proficiency with Quarterstaves in the future, there are already a few classes that do not start with simple weapon proficiency, tho they all list quarterstaff as proficient... so *shrugs*
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I'm also not sure what the point of including Quarterstaff on the proficiency list is since a) it is already a double weapon and b) every single class (now and in the likely future) already has proficiency in it.   It also stands out as the only one with reach.  I proposed that the feat make Quarterstaff useable as a reach weapon to fit in with the other parts of the feat.


Carl



It only lists Quarterstaff as proficiency, it does not also state that Quarterstaff becomes a double weapon

I suppose its possible a class or 2 wont have proficiency with Quarterstaves in the future, there are already a few classes that do not start with simple weapon proficiency, tho they all list quarterstaff as proficient... so *shrugs*



That is because quarterstaff is already a double weapon.


Carl

One point is that is gives the character the advantage on attack of opportunity.


 


Benefit:


You gain proficiency with the glaive, the halberd, the longspear, and the quarterstaff. You have advantage on opportunity attacks using these weapons. When you are wielding a glaive, a halberd,


Or a longspear, the weapon functions as a double weapon that has a second end that deals 1d6 bludgeoning damage.

Indeed - and that isn't nearly as useful as it would have been in 4E since you only get one OA a round.


But my issue is:  The feat takes a collection of weapons that are reach weapons and makes them double weapons.  And it takes a single double weapon and...does nothing.  It seems as if it would make more sense if it took these weapons that are all either reach or double and makes them all both reach and double.   Otherwise - who would ever use this feat with quarterstaff in the first place?  Why use a quarterstaff when you can use any of the other weapons - which all do at least as much damage and have reach.


Carl     
Why use a quarterstaff when you can use any of the other weapons - which all do at least as much damage and have reach.


Carl     


Finesse
Why use a quarterstaff when you can use any of the other weapons - which all do at least as much damage and have reach.


Carl     


Finesse



And, obviously, the feat will give you advantage on OAs with it.  And it's a stick, and not as threatening as a "real" weapon, for those who wish to use a little RP.  However, I would like to see the feat turn the staff into a reach weapon.

"Attack him!  He's only got a stick."
Wizard bashes orc in the face (with Warding Polearm feat) as orc charges.
"From now on, I'll go for the ones with swords.  They're less dangerous!," orc declares as he collapses to the ground.


EDIT: Inadvertently used symbols (greater than and less than signs) that interacted with HTML.