How is this game comparable to MAgic online?

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i cant get enough of this game so i am thinking of magic online

How is this game comparable to MAgic online?
in terms of
1-Money spent ( i feel from what i read i will have to pay hundreds and hundreds of dollars so i can get a good deck to play with)
2-Number People online to play with
3-Broken or not..I mean people who pay money, get good cards, and you if you didnt pay money your cards will be very stupid, and you will be always beaten online.
4-strategic base or money base.. similar to the previous point..to win does it as easy task if you pay money, or even if you pay money, you have to be strategic
I started playing Magic Online pretty regularly in December.

1. money spent - I spent about 100 dollars in December.  But I played in a ton of draft events.  Each event costs about 14 dollars to join.  You can win booster packs if you do well; I averaged winning 2 packs in every draft event I played in - which covers half the cost of the entry fee, so my fee every time was effectively 6 dollars per event after the first (because you can pay the fee in boosters if you choose).  I played in a lot of events, and I have a huge collection of Return to Ravnica cards as a result, including several of the most expensive cards.  If I chose, I could trade those cards for event tickets and I would probably be able to play in 10 more games or so for free (but I'd lose my cards, so, no).  

100 dollars a month is way too much for me; I will play some when Gatecrash comes out but I will substantially curtail my participation.

2. number of people to play online - there are thousands.  
 I haven't played much 1v1 but there are always many games going on at once.  The coolest part about MTGO in my opinion is that you can watch any game that's taking place, and you can watch replays of games that have already occured.  Which means you get to see a lot of pretty cool decks.  Pretty much every deck I've seen is new to me.

3. Broken - I don't know because I have only really played in limited events where everyone drafts a deck out of the same set of booster packs.  So in that sense, the playing field is equal - it comes down to how good you are at constructing a deck from a limited card pool.  It is quite addictive.  As far as playing competitively with a normal deck, there are a lot of people with very expensive cards.  You can play 1v1 just for fun and there is a huge range of decks, from what I can tell (but I haven't done it much).  I think to do well in a tournament though you'd have to shell out a lot of money - in Standard, I see people playing multiple planeswalkers and multiple Bonfire of the Damned in a lot of decks, and all of those cards are well over 20 dollars each.

4. strategic vs. money.  I think to win a tournament you'd have to have both.  For non-tournament play you can play in 'just for fun' rooms where I think money is not as big of a deal. 
The moment you see Magic Online 90's client, you'll come running back to DotP.  I know, I did.
I actually bought MTGO in May, saw the client, and stopped playing immediately.  But I gave it another shot, the beta version isn't nearly as bad, and it really is pretty fun.
I actually bought MTGO in May, saw the client, and stopped playing immediately.  But I gave it another shot, the beta version isn't nearly as bad, and it really is pretty fun.



I bought it last year, and gave up after 3 games.  Wasn't too impressed with the beta client either, when I checked it out last month.  DotP looks spoiled me.  Plus, I think I kind of like the 'limited' format of DotP.  Easier to keep track of all the different cards.
i cant get enough of this game so i am thinking of magic online

How is this game comparable to MAgic online?
in terms of
1-Money spent ( i feel from what i read i will have to pay hundreds and hundreds of dollars so i can get a good deck to play with)
2-Number People online to play with
3-Broken or not..I mean people who pay money, get good cards, and you if you didnt pay money your cards will be very stupid, and you will be always beaten online.
4-strategic base or money base.. similar to the previous point..to win does it as easy task if you pay money, or even if you pay money, you have to be strategic

Rivozz

I have just got back into magic online 3 days ago. I had a pauper deck (commons only) that I paid 20 dollars for. I then cashed in 2 tournaments have bought another deck and still have 18 tix (approx 18dollars) online.

If you are interested and can get past the difference in graphics the game is amazing. There are infinite possibilities compared to DOTP.

1. Just be careful, only play daily events, start with pauper. You can inly soend 30 dollars and never have to pay again if you are patient and good

2. There are loads of people online, you can get a game anytime anywhere. It is better when you have friends online.

3. More money equals better card, but again stick with pauper to begin with

4. Most people have the money to have the best deck, strategy is a massive part of the game.

If you are ever online and have questions add me monk1410
MtG:O is better in every regard, except presentation. The art is a huge factor to me and I'd be willing to buy a full playset of every card available, even the bad ones, if only the presentation was on DotP's level. I really don't get what's so hard about combining MtG:O's translation of rules with the dotp interface... They're missing out on some huge money here, I will certeinly keep my hands off MtG:O as long as it looks like a dos game.
The art is better with the new beta client - you can even zoom in on cards with it.  It's not as good as DOTP but it's still pretty good.  It certainly no longer looks like a DOS game (although I agree with you - it did used to look like that).
MtG:O is better in every regard, except presentation. The art is a huge factor to me and I'd be willing to buy a full playset of every card available, even the bad ones, if only the presentation was on DotP's level. I really don't get what's so hard about combining MtG:O's translation of rules with the dotp interface... They're missing out on some huge money here, I will certeinly keep my hands off MtG:O as long as it looks like a dos game.


I always thought this was one of the reasons Stainless was taking over production of Magic: Online after DotP was so successful.
 

I always thought this was one of the reasons Stainless was taking over production of Magic: Online after DotP was so successful.
 



You mean they're taking over now, or they've taken over a while back, and the beta client is their work?  Because if they have yet to do some improvements, I'll keep an eye out for a new version.

I always thought this was one of the reasons Stainless was taking over production of Magic: Online after DotP was so successful.
 



You mean they're taking over now, or they've taken over a while back, and the beta client is their work?  Because if they have yet to do some improvements, I'll keep an eye out for a new version.


Supposedly sometime while Duels 2012's Deck packs were being released if I recall correctly.

EDIT: Found it Here

The new client is under construction by Stainless Games (same studio that produced Duels of the Planeswalkers).



I don't follow Magic Online, so I didn't read any further into it than that. Obviously Stainless was given the job because of Duels, so I figured it had something to do with Duels.



...

EDIT: Found it Here

The new client is under construction by Stainless Games (same studio that produced Duels of the Planeswalkers).



I don't follow Magic Online, so I didn't read any further into it than that. Obviously Stainless was given the job because of Duels, so I figured it had something to do with Duels.






I sure hope they're not in charge of the network code. If I get one more 'your request to join is pending', my keyboard will stop working due to excessive vomit.


EDIT: Found it Here

The new client is under construction by Stainless Games (same studio that produced Duels of the Planeswalkers).



I don't follow Magic Online, so I didn't read any further into it than that. Obviously Stainless was given the job because of Duels, so I figured it had something to do with Duels.




Oh well.  Looks like they've already done the new client, and while slightly better looking, it's still nowhere near DotP quality.  Maybe in a few years then.

I always thought this was one of the reasons Stainless was taking over production of Magic: Online after DotP was so successful.

Stainless is not taking over anything. Stainless did the initial design for the beta client UI, but Wizards is continuing the development of the UI themselves. Wizards is also still responsible for maintenance and everything on the server side.
I always thought this was one of the reasons Stainless was taking over production of Magic: Online after DotP was so successful.

Stainless is not taking over anything. They did the original design for the beta UI. Wizards is doing the rest of the development themselves. Wizards is still responsible for maintenance and everything on the server side.


That's what I meant. Not taking over as in "sole production of". Rather that they were taking over the UI design or whatever.

Saying "Taking over" was heavy handed, but simplistic and required no thought on my part.

1. Money Spent.


You certainly won't have to spend “hundreds and hundreds” to get a good deck to play with. A successful standard deck, however, will probably set you back in the region of 100. Unless you are totally focussed on a single creation though, you are going to spend more than that. It ain't cheap, don't let anyone tell you different. It ain't all bad though – most of the money goes on a set of 4 of whichever rares are essential for a major archetype right now. Everything else is dirt cheap – pennies. Commons are effectively free.


2. Number of people to play with.


Lots. Lots and lots.


3. Broken or not.


Without the right cards for a format, you have no chance whatsoever. All but pauper will cost you. That's how it is. The problem is not so much that creating one competitive deck is prohibively expensive, since it isn't, but that to become intimately familiar with the decks you will be playing against would require assembling all of them at great expense.


4. strategic base or money base.


An experienced drafter could wade right in and make a profit every day. Pretty hard to become an experienced drafter when its costing a fortune to learn though. Real magic is a better place for that, where you at least get physical objects, a fun evening, and some educational banter for your money.


For constructed formats, its much like Duels. The players would often be better, but your deck is eventually going to be one of the popular archetypes tweaked to your preference, so you'll be competitive enough.


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More Broadly:


Positive points:


It IS Magic. The actual thing. The only restriction is your imagination and blah blah.


Drafting is wondrous fun. A few drafts and you have a healthy enough collection of relevent cards.


Creating decks is hours of enjoyment.You can create that deck you've been thinking of for some time.



Negative points.


That deck you've been thinking of is junk, and will get crushed.


So, most likely you will end up moving it towards the closest successful archetype you've seen on TGCplayer, until such point you are effectively playing a super powered precon with a few tweaks. I've come accross LESS deck variation during nights standard play than during a Duels evening.


Cards are not real. I despise paying real cash for virtual cards. Despise it.


Drafting is expensive.


In-game interface is not very pretty.



Personally, I spend a lot more time on MTGO than Duels. I spend a lot more time actually playing matches on Duels though.


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You should definitely get it, see how you like it. There is a lot of fun to be had, despite any moans I have, and you don't HAVE TO shovel in money.



I advise visiting the MTGOTradersFreeBot for a bunch of free commons ( and its cousin the quizbot ), and then heading to a “5 for 4” commons bot to change these for newer commons. ( all found through classifieds search ). You can then start playing standard or block pauper easily enough, and go where you want from there.


UberSoso pretty much nailed it all so I'll just second what he said. If you're serious about this game then "real" magic will become the only choice, not kiddy play time DotP.

But like he said, if there's a store in your town, better to do some drafts there with real players you can talk to and learn from. Playing paper magic is a better way to learn the strategies, while playing online will give you a very solid understanding of the mechanics. So both are fairly essential to master this game.

Just understand that the good players are really good. If you're not prepared to spend a few months getting stomped, reading forums, watching videos and doing everything you can to actually learn how to play magic, then you will never succeed on teh competitive level.