Setting Up a New Card Game

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So this game, called Dominion, will be developed in this thread. At any point in the game's development, feedback is welcome. 

Right now, some basics:

1. It's a multiple player game, but can be played just as well in 2.
2. It has many similarities with magic.
3. Aside from cards, you will need counters of various sorts, but nothing else.
4. You start at 15 + 5*N life, where N is the number of people playing.
5. You start with 7 cards in hand, and the maximum hand size is 7.
6. There is no exile per se. The cards are either sent to the graveyard or made cease to exist (yes, that can be done routinely in Dominion).


How you win:

You win either when all other players are at 0 life or have 0 cards in their main (not when they can't draw, but when they have 0 cards).
It's way too tedious to invent alternate win conditions.


What you play with:

In this game you have TWO decks, not one ;). They are refered to as the main and the side, but, unlike in magic, you use BOTH at the same time.

The side has exactly 25 cards. The main has between 25 and 40 cards. You can have no more than a pair of the same card in one of your decks (however, you can have a pair of one card in each of your decks).

How you play:

At the beginning of the game, each player shuffles their decks separately, then draws 7 cards from their main. The only exception is the first player,  who begins play with 6 cards.

The game is separated into turns, and each turn is separated into three steps:

> The starting step.
> The main step.
> The end step.

Yup, there's no combat step there, I know. And that's because any card the active player controls with attacking capabilities (we'll get there) can attack individually at any time the stack (I really need to find a better name) is empty.

Normally, only the active player can play cards during his turn. There are, however, some keywords that allow certain cards to bypass that.

There are just four zones in Dominion: the combat zone, the graveyard, and the two deck zones. The combat zone is just one for all players, the others are individual. The hand is not considered a zone.

Cards enter the combat zone in three main ways:

1. They are cast. Casting makes a card enter the stack (yes, I know) and then resolve. Also, after a card is cast, as long as it stays on the field, it has a spell counter on it. Cards with spell counters on them can be dissipated (more on that later). Casting a card requires at least one instance of affinity (a source with affinity is either a card with the keyword affinity or you, the player, as long as you aren't silenced). Whenever a card is cast, a card with affinity or yourself must be declared as the source of said casting. There are cards that require multiple sources for casting - in those cases, this number will be mentioned in the card in the form of "Ritual - X", where X is the exact number of sources needed.

2. They are deployed. Deploying cards costs the same as casting them, but needs no source, doesn't use the...stack, doesn't make them get a spell counter. However, there is a drawback to deploying a card: when a card is deployed, you need to assign it to a platform (more on that later). When a deployed card is removed from combat, the platform is returned to normal, but until then - though luck. You may not deploy multiple cards on the same platform. Some cards require multiple platforms - this number will be mentioned in the card in the form of "Legion - X", where X is the exact number of platforms needed.

3. They enter the combat zone without being cast or deployed. If this is the case, no restrictions hold. This can only happen if a certain card directs it.


In order to cast/deploy cards, you need power. Power can be gotten from various sources, but the primary one is platforms. Aside from effects that make you get platforms, there is a built in mechanism in Dominion to get platforms:


During the starting step, the active player empties his power, untaps all his cards, and then chooses one: Draw a card from one of your decks, or identify one of your platforms, or put a platform onto the combat zone.


Putting a platform onto the combat zone is done thusly: take the card on the top of your side without looking at it and put it face down in the combat zone. It is thereby considered a platform and can be tapped each turn for one colorless power. If a platform has something deployed on it, it can't untap for power until that card is removed somehow.

When a platform is removed from combat without ceasing to exist, unless otherwise stated, you put it in the graveyard face down. You may not, neither while in the combat zone nor in the graveyard, look at the front of a card that became a platform.

Identifying a platform is done by putting a red, blue, white or black counter on it. A platform may not have more than one such counter (named power counters) on it. You cannot identify a platform that has a card deployed on it, although deploying a card on a platform does not remove power counters (and any other types of counters, for that matter) from it.

If a platform has a power counter on it, it produces mana of that particular color when tapped. However, identifying all your platforms is not really smart, and not only because of the card advantage you lose from skipping draws: in Dominion, colorless power is only that: colorless power. You can't pay colorless costs with colored power. For instance, if you have two colorless platforms and two red ones, you cannot cast/deploy a card that costs at all.

Flavorwise, red-blue represent chaos-order, and white-black represent good-evil. There are a plethora of cards that cost only colorless, and a few cards with vibrant power in their costs (one unit of vibrant power acts as the colorless mana in Magic - it can be paid with power of any color/colorless).

Card Types

There are 4 types of cards in Dominion: Creatures, Squads, Items (either Equipment, Structure, or no subtype), Magic (Immediate or Persistent).

Squad cards cannot be cast, Magic cards cannot be deployed. Items and Creatures can be both cast and deployed, and in both cases the source/platform requirement is not stated and always 1.


Creatures

Parts of a creature:

Cost: How much the creature costs. Straightforward enough.
Subtypes: You know the drill. Human, elf, wizard, warrior, etc.
Life: How much damage must be done to a creature to drop it dead. Keep in mind that normally, creatures don't heal on their own.
Attack: this is how much damage the creature deals when it attacks players or other creatures.
C Attack: this is how much damage the creature deals when it is being attacked (but not when it blocks, see Combat later).
Abilities: This is really varied.
Flavor: Same.

Creatures are either pretty big monsters, notable characters, or just loners. They can be either cast or deployed.


Squads


Parts of a squad:

Cost: How much the squad costs.
Subtypes: Same as creatures.
Units: How many troops compose a squad. Each one point of damage removes one unit, unless otherwise mentioned by the card. Healing effects don't affect the number of units.
Attack: A squad deals damage equal to this number multiplied by the number of units. Sometimes, this number is a fraction. In such cases, first multiply by the number of units and then round down to the nearest integer.
Abilities: This is really varied.
Flavor: Same.

Squads are groups of (normally smaller) creatures that fight together. They can only be deployed.


Items

Parts of a creature:

Cost: How much the Item costs.
Subtype: Equipment, Structure, or none. The other stats differ depending on this:

Equipment:

Equip cost: How much power you must pay to equip the item while in the combat zone. After an item is equipped, it cannot normally change owners. Equipping can only be done by the active player. If a Creature or Squad leaves the combat zone with an item equipped to it, the item remains in the combat zone (and, if the creature/squad has been deployed, the item occupies the platform it left). When an item you deployed is equipped, its platform is freed. Nobody owns Equipment that isn't equipped, and anybody can equip an equipment item, provided they are the active player at that time.

Structure:

Life: How much damage must be done to this item to destroy it. Structures are usually buildings.

Untyped:

Untyped items have no additional stats.


Magic

Parts of a Magic:

Cost: How much the Magic costs.
Subtype: Either Immediate or Persistent. Immediate Magic ceases to exist after it resolves, Persistent Magic stays on the combat zone, and usually destroying it (non-dissipate removal) sends it to the graveyard.
Effect: You know the drill.


Tomorrow, the subject is combat.
there's already a card game called Dominion FYI

 
120.6. Some effects replace card draws.
it draws 5 cards every turn
 
"some stones should be left unturned" ~Urlock
so whats from stopping someone using.

Into the Void |
Magic
All opponents discards their hand and skips their next draw phase.
Today your enjoyed your freedom, but tonight you shall be shackled in the darkness.


I mean wouldn't this be an insta win?
there's already a card game called Dominion FYI

 


And a rather famous one, given as it spawned a whole genre.

6. There is no exile per se. The cards are either sent to the graveyard or made cease to exist (yes, that can be done routinely in Dominion).


That's a meaningless distinction.
It's exile (the 'removed from the game' zone) but you're calling it something else. Much like the graveyard is a discard pile, but called something else.

Flavorwise, red-blue represent chaos-order, and white-black represent good-evil. There are a plethora of cards that cost only colorless, and a few cards with vibrant power in their costs (one unit of vibrant power acts as the colorless mana in Magic - it can be paid with power of any color/colorless).


So you have five colours, but rather than Green you have Grey? 


Also, why are you calling it "power" rather than "mana"? "Power" makes a lot of sense for a sci-fi game, but it sounds like this is a magic themed game, and mana is the standard term. 
"graveyard" is shorter than "discard pile" by 4 characters. "Exciled" is shorter than "removed from the game"
 
"some stones should be left unturned" ~Urlock
"graveyard" is shorter than "discard pile" by 4 characters.


Also, importantly, it's more thematically appropriate.
If a game doesn't have creatures, then a "graveyard" is a bad name for the discards. It's not terrible, because it's been popularised by magic, but it's not good. 
Everyone knows what a disard pile is.

Crazy Eights sorcery
Get a card from your deck and put it in your hand. Shuffle
 
"some stones should be left unturned" ~Urlock
there's already a card game called Dominion FYI



True. I'm open to name suggestions.

 












GeorgeW












Date Joined: Jan 6, 2013



Posts: 78




so whats from stopping someone using.

Into the Void | 
Magic
All opponents discards their hand and skips their next draw phase.
Today your enjoyed your freedom, but tonight you shall be shackled in the darkness.


I mean wouldn't this be an insta win?




Aside from the fact that you are spending 5 mana, 2 of which you need identified, and your opponents are still left with things on the battlefield that can kill you, and they can counter your Into the Void, yes, it would be an instant win. It also would probably cost more than 7, so it would pretty much be the Omniscience of the game. Win-more, but not terribly efficient.

That's a meaningless distinction.
It's exile (the 'removed from the game' zone) but you're calling it something else. Much like the graveyard is a discard pile, but called something else.



It's not a meaningless distinction, and it's not exile. When a card is exiled in magic, it's still in the game. When a token ceases to exist in magic, it isn't. So that's exactly what happens with cards that cease to exist in this game: exactly like tokens, they are removed from the game without a trace and can't come back ever. An effect such as "Target Squad ceases to exist and is put onto the combat zone at the end of your next starting step." would be just as meaningless in this game as effects such as "Exile target token permanent. Return it to the battlefield during your next upkeep." are in Magic.

 
So you have five colours, but rather than Green you have Grey?



Firstly, colorless is the default power produced by platforms. So it's easier to get than colored. Secondly, cards that actually require colored power to be played will be rather rare, and cards that will require ONLY colored power will be exceedingly rare.

 
Also, why are you calling it "power" rather than "mana"? "Power" makes a lot of sense for a sci-fi game, but it sounds like this is a magic themed game, and mana is the standard term.



Because, as I have written in the OP, cards have two modes of entering the battlefield: they can be either cast or deployed. Deployment is completely nonmagical and it wouldn't make sense to have mana (or any other magical terminology) be used with it. Which is why I chose a more neutral term, such as power. If you want, I could change it to something like Resources, but mana simply doesn't work for the aforementioned reasons.

 If a game doesn't have creatures, then a "graveyard" is a bad name for the discards.



It does have creatures.