D&DN 35

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Dear Diary.



The grandson came into the house today with the boxed set of D&D. He asked “grandad didn't you play D&D once”? “Why yes I did Billy”. Anyway he offered to let me play and he gets a group of his friends over. “Be gentle kids grandad is getting old and I have not paid much attention to the game since 2008”. The new red boxed set get pulled out and its a bit bigger than what I remember but it has the classic artwork from the 80's on it. One can tell it is old as the fighter on the cover actually has clothes on.



Time to get a PC rolled up. “How do you create characters these days Billy? I learn that this new version of D&D has a choice of 7 characters Cleric, Fighter, Rogue and Wizard plus Dwarf, Elf and Halfling. I can dig this I think it sounds familiar. At least there is no Dark Elf or Dragonborn gonzo rubbish. “What do you want to be grandad?” asks Billy. “I'll be the Cleric, nobody wants to play the cleric”. The kid hands me a plastic mini of a cleric. She appears to be a sun priestess bathing in the sun. Naked. With a conveniently placed sun disk between her legs. “There you go grandad the deluxe version removes the sun disk” says Billy with a grin on his face. “She is an ultra rare though”.



Uh huh whatever I think. Back in the day we had internet porn whatever floats your boat I suppose. “Ok Billy do I need to roll ability scores or pick an alignment?”. “No Grandad alignment is a silly rule and this is edition 35th edition. They got rid of ability scores in 32nd edition” Billy grins at me as if I am foolish. “You have been playing for a few years then”? I inquire. “Na 32nd edition was 2 years ago, I was a newb back then Pops”. “35th edition is the most balanced one yet” Billy says enthusiastically. A yelp of delight comes from across the room as one of the kids opens a D&D minis expansion box. One of the girls has popped a Paladin in a booster box and promptly declares she is going to play it. I look at Billy who has offered to DM it and he shrugs “RAW Pops, everything the players open is allowed in game, don't want to disappoint them”. “What does a Paladin do in this game”? I ask. “Nothing comes the reply but his mini has a shield and +1 AC”. Billy chimes in claiming “That's so broken. The Paladin is a power piece and its a mega ultra rare. There are calls on the forums for it to be banned”.



Anyway Billy keeps setting the game up. Seems the boxed set has a board. He lays it on the ground and places the party in a spot named the Inn and puts two piles of cards in the middle of the board. One of them is named Community Treasure and the other is named Encounters. Anyway I get to go 1st and Billy hands me 2d6 and 1500gp to start off with. “Roll the dice grand dad he says enthusiastically” puzzled I roll the dice and get a 4 and a 6. I move around the board 10 spaces and I land in the Dungeon. Luckily however RAW I am just visiting and you can only get sent there via encounter cards and landing on the “Go to Dungeon” square on the opposite side of the board. Everyone else rolls dice and the girl whose name eludes me lands on an encounter space. Looking afraid she reaches over and draws an encounter card. It reads.



You chase off some Orc Marauders. Advance to the Inn and collect 200gp. If you are the Paladin your shield bash hits the Orc. Collect an additional 200gp”.



She screams out “YESSSS suckers”. Turns out the minis come with extra cards for the card piles. “Billy pipes up “And that is why its so broken the shield is blatantly overpowered” A few more turn go by And one of the other players lands on a place called Greyhawk City. It is color coded with Sigil and on the same side of the board there are Baldurs Gate, Menzoberranzan, and Waterdeep which are a nice shade of green. Nice and simple I suppose. Anyway he decides to buy Greyhawk city. He quips “If I can get Sigil as well I can build keeps on each one and collect more income from you guys. 4 keeps and I can upgrade to a fortress!!!” The other players look horrified as a fortress on Greyhawk is worth 2000gp each time a player lands on it.



Anyway a few more turns later I land on various fortresses and keeps and I am down to my last 100gp. I land on an encounter card.



“Ogre Tax collector lose 150gp”. All my properties are turned sideways or “tapped “with the word usury written on them. Billy looks a bit glum and says “Sorry Grandad you are out of the game. You do get to go back to the Inn though and watch the rest of the game”. Anyway the Paladin wins that game after she pops an encounter card “Pit Fiend lose 500gp, if you are the Paladin you SMITE EVIL it collect 1000gp”. He has Sigil through to Menzoberranzan with fortresses on them.



“So Granddad what do you think” asks Billy. Carefully I ask “Where the role playing”. Billy looks a bit puzzled and responds “ Not everyone was good at it so they thought it was unbalanced. Its still an RPG though as its a Roll Playing Game. Ok whatever. So the classes are more or less balanced now? Billy pipes up “Not really you just saw how broken the Paladin was. The Barbarian gets fast movement and gets to roll 2d6+1 to move around the board. Its not perfect but its the best balanced version of D&D yet. Well apart from 33rd edition that flopped”. Looking puzzle I asked what was wrong with 33rd edition. Billy enthusiastically responds “they replaced the d6s for being to complicated and they flipped metals discs they called “coins” he global financial meltdown of 2028 made metal very valuable. They also packaged the coins in random boosters. So once the initial print run ran out no one could play the game. The combat system was very simple you and the DM flipped coins and whoever won the flips won the combat. If you lost 5 flips in a row your character was killed though. It was the last time they had random variables in combat even though the d2 system was popular and it had a OGL as well. To unbalanced. The d20 was also to complicated and now its d6 based".



By now I was a little puzzled. “Can you still play older editions of the game” At this Billy looks a little apprehensive. “Not really each edition is only legal for a year before it cycles out. They do have some older formats but you can only use material from 2024onwards”. “Why 2024” I ask? In a hotly contested US election some Hasbro executive ran for office and won the election due to a supreme court decision rewarding Florida to the president elect. In 2021 President Mearls made it a capital crime to own older D&D material. Bonfire of the vanities were held throughout the continental USA where old D&D material was consigned to the flames. The Great Purge as it came to be known resulted in a combined FBI and Navy SEAL's laying siege to the last holdouts in the Paizo offices. They starved them out by cutting off Pizza deliveries. There are rumors that old 3rd and 4th ed books PHB are worth over $10 000 000 each”. While Billy may be a child a million dollars these days pays for the groceries for a family of 5 for a week. Still a bit of money when you are 10 years old though.



“Grandad weren't you in New Zealand in 2021 when President Mearls passed his law? Can I have a look at those boxes of books you have in the basement”? Billy asks all innocently. Erm never mind Billy got to go.


 Fear is the Mind Killer

 

dnd fanfiction?

i can't see what this has to do with 5th edition, but i guess there's not really a section for disjointed wall-of-text ramblings. 
Can you give us a tl;dr? I feel like most of the topics you start are unnecessary walls of text that could easily be thoroughly explained in a fifth of the space. I mean, good for you that you have so much to say, but brevity is the soul of wit.

Why, yes, as a matter of fact I am the Unfailing Arbiter of All That Is Good Design (Even More So Than The Actual Developers) TM Speaking of things that were badly designed, please check out this thread for my Minotaur fix. What have the critics said, you ask? "If any of my players ask to play a Minotaur, I'm definitely offering this as an alternative to the official version." - EmpactWB "If I ever feel like playing a Minotaur I'll know where to look!" - Undrave "WoTC if you are reading this - please take this guy's advice." - Ferol_Debtor_of_Torm "Really full of win. A minotaur that is actually attractive for more than just melee classes." - Cpt_Micha Also, check out my recent GENASI variant! If you've ever wished that your Fire Genasi could actually set stuff on fire, your Water Genasi could actually swim, or your Wind Genasi could at least glide, then look no further. Finally, check out my OPTIONS FOR EVERYONE article, an effort to give unique support to the races that WotC keeps forgetting about. Includes new racial feature options for the Changeling, Deva, Githzerai, Gnoll, Gnome, Goliath, Half-Orc, Kalashtar, Minotaur, Shadar-Kai, Thri-Kreen, Warforged and more!
 Wasn't meant to be a cmparison to Tolkein, tl dr is fine by me I'm not trying to force you to read it.

 Fear is the Mind Killer

 

tl dr is fine by me

It really shouldn't be. I mean, I didn't give the critique that I did to be mean. I gave it to try to help you reach more people with your topics. If you want more people to participate in the discussion that you're wanting to start, try being more concise in your presentation of the topic.

Why, yes, as a matter of fact I am the Unfailing Arbiter of All That Is Good Design (Even More So Than The Actual Developers) TM Speaking of things that were badly designed, please check out this thread for my Minotaur fix. What have the critics said, you ask? "If any of my players ask to play a Minotaur, I'm definitely offering this as an alternative to the official version." - EmpactWB "If I ever feel like playing a Minotaur I'll know where to look!" - Undrave "WoTC if you are reading this - please take this guy's advice." - Ferol_Debtor_of_Torm "Really full of win. A minotaur that is actually attractive for more than just melee classes." - Cpt_Micha Also, check out my recent GENASI variant! If you've ever wished that your Fire Genasi could actually set stuff on fire, your Water Genasi could actually swim, or your Wind Genasi could at least glide, then look no further. Finally, check out my OPTIONS FOR EVERYONE article, an effort to give unique support to the races that WotC keeps forgetting about. Includes new racial feature options for the Changeling, Deva, Githzerai, Gnoll, Gnome, Goliath, Half-Orc, Kalashtar, Minotaur, Shadar-Kai, Thri-Kreen, Warforged and more!
Yeah, I read it, and I'm not really sure what you're trying to say. Mearls and his team have added several die rolls to the game, removed none, and made the ability scores more important than they have been recently. I don't see the point of this dystopian future.
Cute, OP.  I laughed. Smile

"Lightning...it flashes bright, then fades away.  It can't protect, it can only destroy."

this was more worth reading than 100 pages of what lawful good means...
"The secret we should never let the gamemasters know is that they don't need any rules." Gygax
Can you give us a tl;dr? I feel like most of the topics you start are unnecessary walls of text that could easily be thoroughly explained in a fifth of the space. I mean, good for you that you have so much to say, but brevity is the soul of wit.



I second this.

I actually wanted to say this without looking rude, but seriously the big wall of text. 

We know you have a lot to say, but please tone it down. The only reason why I didn't read this one is because I didn't understand the title and I am not going to read a wall of text to find out. 



Zard, I enjoyed reading your post.   It has an Bradbury/Orwellian feel to it.  I hope your vision does not come true.   lol.

A Brave Knight of WTF - "Wielder of the Sword of Balance"

 

Rhenny's Blog:  http://community.wizards.com/user/1497701/blog

 

 

I don't see how this is the least bit relevent, but it was entertaining.  So... there's that I suppose ;)
Zard is just feeling his age, as the world passes him by. Grandpa knows the difference between roll playing and role playing, and every version of D&D will allow it, if you don't get stuck in the past. But it is important that Grandpa keeps an open mind to new experiences. He may be pleasantly surprised.
I'm not really sure I understand the complaint here... Is this a really long way of saying recent d&d feels like a board game? Or are you explicitly referring to the line of d&d board games?

It seems pretty baseless to fear that d&d will keep going that way, next looks to be very deliberately unboardgamey.
"So shall it be! Dear-bought those songs shall be be accounted, and yet shall be well-bought. For the price could be no other. Thus even as Eru spoke to us shall beauty not before conceived be brought into Eä, and evil yet be good to have been." - Manwë, High King of the Valar
D&D 12 will be holodeck so nyeh
  Creative Character Build Collection and The Magic of King's and Heros  also Can Martial Characters Fly? 

Improvisation in 4e: Fave 4E Improvisations - also Wrecans Guides to improvisation beyond page 42
The Non-combatant Adventurer (aka Princess build Warlord or LazyLord)
Reality is unrealistic - and even monkeys protest unfairness
Reflavoring the Fighter : The Wizard : The Swordmage - Creative Character Collection: Bloodwright (Darksun Character) 

At full hit points and still wounded to incapacitation? you are playing 1e.
By virtue of being a player your characters are the protagonists in a heroic fantasy game even at level one
"Wizards and Warriors need abilities with explicit effects for opposite reasons. With the wizard its because you need to create artificial limits on them, they have no natural ones and for the Warrior you need to grant permission to do awesome."

 

I've removed content from this thread. Trolling/baiting is a violation of the Code of Conduct

You can review the Code of Conduct here: company.wizards.com/conduct

Please remember to keep your posts polite, on topic and refrain from personal attacks. You are free to disagree with one another as long as it is done in a respectful manner. 
dnd fanfiction?

i can't see what this has to do with 5th edition, but i guess there's not really a section for disjointed wall-of-text ramblings. 



Actually, we do have a section for blogs. community.wizards.com/go/browse/blogs

Seriously Z, your next short story would make a better blog than a forum post.   

"Ah, the age-old conundrum. Defenders of a game are too blind to see it's broken, and critics are too idiotic to see that it isn't." - Brian McCormick

Agreed.  This should be a blog.
The Next rules are obviously meant for the generation that posts TLDR to a 10 paragraph post. That's why everything needs to be modular.
The Next rules are obviously meant for the generation that posts TLDR to a 10 paragraph post.

This is the point of the story right here. DDN seems designed to encourage "Just skip to the dice rolling." play, with entire encounters only taking an hour so the average game session can be crammed to the gills with them.
"And then double it!" might as well be the rallying cry of DDN.
The Next rules are obviously meant for the generation that posts TLDR to a 10 paragraph post. That's why everything needs to be modular.



Ah yes, the old "the only reason someone would dislike complexity is because they're incapable of understanding it" argument.
The Next rules are obviously meant for the generation that posts TLDR to a 10 paragraph post. That's why everything needs to be modular.



Ah yes, the old "the only reason someone would dislike complexity is because they're incapable of understanding it" argument.

Actually when you look at games like WoW, Dominion, Magic the Gathering, and League of Legends, you have to wonder if the people who don't like complexity are a vocal minority.
Actually when you look at games like WoW, Dominion, Magic the Gathering, and League of Legends, you have to wonder if the people who don't like complexity are a vocal minority.



I guarantee you that there are lots of people that like playing Chess and Go and just don't post in the same online forums as the people that play WoW.
Actually when you look at games like WoW, Dominion, Magic the Gathering, and League of Legends, you have to wonder if the people who don't like complexity are a vocal minority.



I guarantee you that there are lots of people that like playing Chess and Go and just don't post in the same online forums as the people that play WoW.

Sure, but are you more likely to convince a League of Legends player or a Chess player to play D&D?
It depends on the edition and the player, I would imagine.
It depends on the edition and the player, I would imagine.

Player sure, although one could generalize. I'm not sure D&D editions are diverse enough to create that much of a change in the baseline answer.
Here's a summary for those who aren't interested in slogging through that mess. I have no idea which parts are supposed to be sarcastic parody and which parts are supposed to be allegory, so I'm presenting everything as approximately literal:

"The future is scary. The past is possibly also scary as well, and gross things from the past are something that's exaggerated in the future for some reason. All game adjustments tend to continue more and more in the same direction to absurd ends, even ones that nobody really wants or cares for. The D&D board games are definitely scary as hell. Zardnaar is familiar with the basic rules of the board game Monoply. Balance concerns are a threat to roleplaying? Magic: the Gathering is also scary. In conclusion, corporate greed or something."

------------------------------

Chess and Magic actually handle complexity in a pretty similar fashion. They both have small initial learning curve humps (slightly larger for Magic) before you can basically play the game, and then a massive but gentle slope towards greater and greater strategic complexity as you're ready for it.
Dwarves invented beer so they could toast to their axes. Dwarves invented axes to kill people and take their beer. Swanmay Syndrome: Despite the percentages given in the Monster Manual, in reality 100% of groups of swans contain a Swanmay, because otherwise the DM would not have put any swans in the game.
Let me put it this way:  I've played D and D with people that I play computer games with, and I've played D and D with people that I've done theater with.  They want different things from a role playing game system.
Let me put it this way:  I've played D and D with people that I play computer games with, and I've played D and D with people that I've done theater with.  They want different things from a role playing game system.

Fair enough. My theatre, LARP, and TTRPG circles overlap and integrate quite well. Complexity has never hindered roleplaying in my experience.
Chess and Magic actually handle complexity in a pretty similar fashion. They both have small initial learning curve humps (slightly larger for Magic) before you can basically play the game, and then a massive but gentle slope towards greater and greater strategic complexity as you're ready for it.



I don't know if it's possible to quantitate complexity, and it's possible that the degree of difficulty is the same between the two games, but I think chess and Magic have very different sources of difficulty.  Chess has, by my count, 20 rules total:

- A rule for how you set up the board
- A rule for how you win
- A rule for what happens when neither player can win
- A rule that says you keep playing until an explicit forfeit (i.e. you cannot make a move that would allow your opponent to take your king on their next turn if possible to avoid that)
- A rule for who goes first
- A rule that says pieces can't move through each other
- An exception to this rule for knights
- A rule that says that if you move your piece onto an opponent's piece, the opponent's piece is removed from the board
- Five rules for the movement of rooks, bishops, knights, king, queen
- Three rules for the basic movement of pawns
- Four edge cases:  en passant, pawn promotion, king's castle and queen's castle

Chess's difficulty comes entirely from the fact that these rules interact with each other.  However, you never have to worry about something "weird" happening; i.e., all strategies and common situations in the game arise from these twenty facts.  (And to get even more extreme, if you dislike having to learn 20 different rules, there's always Go, which by my quick estimate has about five rules.)

On the other hand, in Magic, most cards essentially have their own rules.  Instead of eight rules for how to use specific pieces, you end up with dozens or hundreds, depending on what cards are allowed.  It's a very different type of difficulty, and someone who enjoys that part of the challenge of the game is the "rules metagame" will probably enjoy Magic more than chess (and vice versa).
Chess and Magic actually handle complexity in a pretty similar fashion. They both have small initial learning curve humps (slightly larger for Magic) before you can basically play the game, and then a massive but gentle slope towards greater and greater strategic complexity as you're ready for it.



I don't know if it's possible to quantitate complexity, and it's possible that the degree of difficulty is the same between the two games, but I think chess and Magic have very different sources of difficulty.  Chess has, by my count, 20 rules total:

- A rule for how you set up the board
- A rule for how you win
- A rule for what happens when neither player can win
- A rule that says you keep playing until an explicit forfeit (i.e. you cannot make a move that would allow your opponent to take your king on their next turn if possible to avoid that)
- A rule for who goes first
- A rule that says pieces can't move through each other
- An exception to this rule for knights
- A rule that says that if you move your piece onto an opponent's piece, the opponent's piece is removed from the board
- Five rules for the movement of rooks, bishops, knights, king, queen
- Three rules for the basic movement of pawns
- Four edge cases:  en passant, pawn promotion, king's castle and queen's castle

Chess's difficulty comes entirely from the fact that these rules interact with each other.  However, you never have to worry about something "weird" happening; i.e., all strategies and common situations in the game arise from these twenty facts.  (And to get even more extreme, if you dislike having to learn 20 different rules, there's always Go, which by my quick estimate has about five rules.)

On the other hand, in Magic, most cards essentially have their own rules.  Instead of eight rules for how to use specific pieces, you end up with dozens or hundreds, depending on what cards are allowed.  It's a very different type of difficulty, and someone who enjoys that part of the challenge of the game is the "rules metagame" will probably enjoy Magic more than chess (and vice versa).

That's a very valid point. Even if Magic didn't have far more than 20 basic rules that aren't on the cards (plus tons of edge cases), the fact that each card's rules are written on it where you can see them doesn't make them not rules. It's definitely a different sort of complexity. The key is, though, that you don't need to know what dozens or hundreds of cards do to play the game. You don't have to internalize the value of every monopoly property or what all the Chance and Community Chest cards do in order to play Monopoly, because those rules are written on the cards.
Dwarves invented beer so they could toast to their axes. Dwarves invented axes to kill people and take their beer. Swanmay Syndrome: Despite the percentages given in the Monster Manual, in reality 100% of groups of swans contain a Swanmay, because otherwise the DM would not have put any swans in the game.
Way too long for a post that makes hypothetical claims that no one is playing around with. Nice reading though just over the top.
Well....

It was much more entertaining than nearly everything else any of you post.
Let me put it this way:  I've played D and D with people that I play computer games with, and I've played D and D with people that I've done theater with.  They want different things from a role playing game system.



Different games with different hats/roles, I suppose.  I've changed things up for; people that have worked with my on film/theater sets during college, my old suitemates (that were pretty much computer geeks.  Hey, at least I didn't have to worry about tech service appointments), and some of my friends in my hometown (they're mostly wargamers and historical gamers).  Each want a different type of game.  The beauty of D&D in its many forms is they can each get what they want.  And if D&DNext succeeds, I can run different games with the same set of books (or a few extra here and there)

An undead spectre occasionally returning to remind the fandom of its grim existence.

 

 

Some good pointers for the fellow hobbyist!:

  • KEEP D&D ALIVE, END EDITION WARS!
  • RESPECT PEOPLES' PREFERENCES
  • JUST ENJOY THE GAME!
This is the point of the story right here. DDN seems designed to encourage "Just skip to the dice rolling." play, with entire encounters only taking an hour so the average game session can be crammed to the gills with them. "And then double it!" might as well be the rallying cry of DDN.


I disagree.  Sure, the playtest materials have a lot of information about dice rolling (which is what needs the real playtesting).  But there's still a whole lot of material devoted entirely to enhancing roleplay.  The backgrounds, for instance, each have a trait which encourages roleplay.
This is the point of the story right here. DDN seems designed to encourage "Just skip to the dice rolling." play, with entire encounters only taking an hour so the average game session can be crammed to the gills with them. "And then double it!" might as well be the rallying cry of DDN.


I disagree.  Sure, the playtest materials have a lot of information about dice rolling (which is what needs the real playtesting).  But there's still a whole lot of material devoted entirely to enhancing roleplay.  The backgrounds, for instance, each have a trait which encourages roleplay.

The push for streamlined character creation gives the impression from the very beginning of the first play session that the drive of the game is to hurry up and get to the combat.  Yes, some of those streamlined creation aspects include roleplaying hooks and options.  They still seem like little more than afterthoughts or breadcrumbs when the game seems focused on "How many encounters can we cram into one gaming session?".
The push for streamlined character creation gives the impression from the very beginning of the first play session that the drive of the game is to hurry up and get to the combat.  Yes, some of those streamlined creation aspects include roleplaying hooks and options.  They still seem like little more than afterthoughts or breadcrumbs when the game seems focused on "How many encounters can we cram into one gaming session?".


I think the focus on getting through a number of encounters is about roleplaying.  When I ran 4th Edition, I would come to a point where I could either let the PCs explore the town and roleplay, or I could push them along so that we'd have time for a second combat.  I couldn't do both (though I mostly chose roleplay).  My 5th Edition game has no such issues.  Combat resolves at a nice, speedy clip, which allows me to take a more luxurious pace with roleplay and exploration.  And in getting more combats to a session, the story and plot can resolve faster.

Your experience may differ from mine.  But 5th Edition has been a wonderful experience for my group so far, in large part due to the quicker combat. 
Zard, I enjoyed reading your post.   It has an Bradbury/Orwellian feel to it.  I hope your vision does not come true.   lol.



I see, so you and Zardnaar have ultimate authority and have decided how everyone in the world should play D&D "correctly" for all eternity.

That's quite a power trip.

D&D 35th edition is no ones concern. However Next is what is important and NO ONE has the right to push anyone out for how they like to play. That is the stated goal of the game. Some people on here refuse to accept that. Some people refuse to accept that other people WILL get things that they like and that those things WILL be in the first books.

D&D Next is supposed to stop all the edition waring and make a single game that we can all play.

Shame you and Zardnaar can't let others join in "your" fun. Because obviously in you opinion there's a lot of people out there "doing it wrong".

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

There is a nice little self created divide here. Shame there can't be more acceptance instead. I feel that is where the future of the game should be.

All this vitriol, pushing away, retroactive retaliation, and preemptive striking needs to stop.

I keep trying but some won't let things go. Will you?

 

Because you like something, it does not mean it is good. Because you dislike something, it does not mean it is bad. Because it is your opinion, it does not make it everyone's opinion. Because it is your opinion, it does not make it truth. Because it is your opinion, it does not make it the general consensus. Whatever side you want to take, at least remember these things.

Yeah, Zardnaar.  Stop telling people that they are doing it wrong.

You should just let them do have their Badwrongfun in peace.

Shame.

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Homogenising: Making vanilla in 31 different colours
 I am very sowie.

 Fear is the Mind Killer

 

that made me laugh
The push for streamlined character creation gives the impression from the very beginning of the first play session that the drive of the game is to hurry up and get to the combat.  Yes, some of those streamlined creation aspects include roleplaying hooks and options.  They still seem like little more than afterthoughts or breadcrumbs when the game seems focused on "How many encounters can we cram into one gaming session?".


I think the focus on getting through a number of encounters is about roleplaying.  When I ran 4th Edition, I would come to a point where I could either let the PCs explore the town and roleplay, or I could push them along so that we'd have time for a second combat.  I couldn't do both (though I mostly chose roleplay).  My 5th Edition game has no such issues.  Combat resolves at a nice, speedy clip, which allows me to take a more luxurious pace with roleplay and exploration.  And in getting more combats to a session, the story and plot can resolve faster.

Your experience may differ from mine.  But 5th Edition has been a wonderful experience for my group so far, in large part due to the quicker combat. 

Some of my favorite campaigns have gone multiple sessions without a single combat and still had plenty of plot resolution. I see the decision of "second combat vs. roleplay" to already be too focused on "How many encounters can we cram into one session?". I also see the drive towards plot resolution as moving away from roleplaying. With roleplaying you want engagement in the plot. Driving it towards resolution as quickly as possible prevents in depth engagement between the players and the plot.
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