My players always minmax.

STR - Always low
DEX - Always high
CON - Always 10
INT - Always low unless wizard
WIS - Always low unless cleric
CHA - Always low

The usefulness of STR has been removed, and the usefullness of INT/WIS/CHA has always been based on classes in previous versions/Pathfinder, so I really wish they would add some sort of universal buff to these stats so that players aren't so quick to drop them.

My first suggestion is to drop DEX Mod from damage, and beyond that, perception skills should get a bigger bonus from WIS, INT should buff knowledge more (like each point of INT Mod would give a Knowledge skill for free or something), and CHA should influence Intimidate/Social interaction more.

As it is, STR, DEX, and CON all give big number bonuses that can be useful (once you take DEX mod away from damage, of course) and INT/WIS/CHA apply a single +1 to ability checks, as their only bonus.
Remember that your saving throws are now all essentially attribute checks and that there are (theoretically) effects that are resisted by every attribute.
Yes, if they're neglecting half their stats, they aren't facing enough life-or-death saving throws, using Strength to pull themselves up while dangling from a ledge over a spike pit, using Con against all the poison they keep finding in their drinks, etc.
WIS has been surprisingly useful in our play testing so far for spotting things, whether it be traps or just where the enemy is hiding.

Some amount of min-maxing will happen. If you limit your players to standard 27-point buy as per RAW, they can't get a single stat above 15 pre-race/class, and they won't get past 17/18 post-race/class (18 human, 17 everyone else), at least Level 1. That means they have points to spend elsewhere.

You can also throw some STR-based things at them, such as the mentioned ledge, or monsters attempting to push them around, or into terrain hazards (wells, lava, &c). Monsters, too, can do more than just attack.
Yeah but those kind of saves and checks exist with all stats, Dex and Con give something more that makes them worthwhile, the same way INT does for a wizard, and WIS does for a cleric.

The other stats just fall to the wayside, having some usefulness but not enough to make them worth putting points in when the result varies by ~20 with the only rolls those apply to. 
There have been similiar threads.  I agree completely that stats need to be reworked, such that there is a reason for every class to at least consider wanting every stat.

There is also a problem with casters not even caring about their primary casting stat all that much, espcially clerics, since it doesn't really effect anything on many spells.

My first suggestion is to drop DEX Mod from damage, and beyond that, perception skills should get a bigger bonus from WIS, INT should buff knowledge more (like each point of INT Mod would give a Knowledge skill for free or something), and CHA should influence Intimidate/Social interaction more.



Are you talking missle weapons or finesse based characters? Because they are the only ones that get DEX mod to damage.
Skill use can help some, but there's always going to be a problem when using Point Buy.  PB, by default, automatically puts the player in a state of mind where they are required to think about their ability scores as they apply to bonuses for their character.  If your parents could have molded your DNA at birth, they would have done exactly what the players do... create the best possible person they could for what would help them succeed in the world they lived in.

I agree with Gumba that you really have to restrict PB to the 15 CAP, standard RAW 27 point system if you want to at least have them distribute their stats a bit.

Moreover, as mentioned, creative DMing through use of traps/glyphs, environmental features, and creatures that will assault or test things like character STR, a need for social skills (CHA), etc., will at least have players considering having one character that can excel in each category.

Plus, I definitely wouldn't mold treasure to suit players.  If everyone is using finesse weapons and light armor, finding those magic longswords and plate mail is going to be a bummer, because the market for those as sellables really won't be there, neither will they find willing traders.  Having to sell that 2500 GP valued interesting and rare greatsword for 500 GPs will be a bummer because it would have rocked had someone been able to use it.  Same holds true for that magic plate that at 50 pounds is too heavy for anyone to wear.  Selling it for 600 gold and replacing it with some high end normal item like Dragon Leather will be a net loss to what they could have gained.

We use ability score rolling here (4d6, drop lowest) with some minor rules to ensure no hopeless characters are forced upon anyone.  We've even gone as far as doing a 4d6, roll straight down (STR to CHA) and playing what you get from there.  It's been a lot of fun, allowed people to roleplay all sorts of different types of characters and personalities.  Without a doubt, though, that sort of variable creation is not for everyone (to say the least... I think most players are afraid of losing control over molding exactly what they want).

For playtesting, though, with relatively short lived characters and campaigns, it might be worth at least bouncing the idea (rolled stats of some sort) off your group just to see if they'd be willing to consider playing a non-standard, devoid of cookie-cutter builds, roleplaying party.  They'll not lose much in trying something temporarily and may even surprise you with their ability to roleplay and think outside the one-size-fits-all point buy box.

There are plenty of things in the game that require Con, Wis, and Dex. Int and Cha are a bit sparse, and most of all Str. I suggest adding in more strength checks into every adventure, whether its doors that are rusted shut, gusts of wind that threaten to knock you off your feet or into a pit, or a thick liquid you have to cross through. Int and Cha are more out of combat attributes so you will have to be a bit more creative with those.



The idea being if you keep reminding them of how much it sucks that nobody in the party has strenght, eventually someone might cave in and make a traditional character. 

Nobody's making any Fighter-Slayers? I had a player lightly demand that I figure out how to build a half-orc barbarian for him. He had a 20 STR and was smashing everything in sight. Unless everyone is just going DEX Fighter, I don't see how you could do without.

You could say, "Hey, since we're actually playtesting, I need you guys to play some different combinations." Do any of your guys ever run a Dwarf Fighter? Have them try a Dwarf Fighter Reaper. Striker Fighters (to use the 4e terms) are incredibly fun, in my opinion. 
I find the natural cure for Min-Maxing is to be prepared to throw a variety of challenges and monsters at your party, and to communicate that to them.  Having all your points in one stat is like having a party of all fighters; it can work, but as a DM you can ensure that they will have a harder time with challenges a more well rounded party could breeze through.

If our fighters had allocated 10 to their constitution scores, 4 ghouls would have resorted in a level 3 TPK at one session.  ..."window.parent.tinyMCE.get('post_content').onLoad.dispatch();" contenteditable="true" />
Alternatively you could try using statistical arrays and not give them the opportunity to Min-Max.  Arrays have always been my method of choice because they let me effectively let the players.  I structure my arrays with one amazing stat, one great stat,  one pretty good stat, two above average stats, and one average stat.  The beauty of arrays is that you can pick whatever array you want, and be completely fair to your players.

Based on how Next has played so far, I'd recommend something along the lines of 16, 15, 14, 13, 12 10 (Admittedly, this may seem a little high powered, but my group's always gone a little high side as far as stats  go).  I tried 18 16 14, 12, 12, 10 in my IoD playtest thread, but the higher array results in me having to use monsters a step above the PC's level.
No they don't. Taking 10s in Con? That's not minmaxing.
Another good reason to try the optional rule about magic items being limited to CHA modifier (min. 1).  That only helps one stat, but it helps.

DEX is absolutely disproportionately useful, though, especially from a "stats on my sheet" perspective.  You could always throw around other optional rules, too, like:  initiative is the lower (or higher) of DEX or WIS, armor uses STR requirements instead of adding DEX, etc.

13th Age has a pretty good anti-min/max system you could steal:  bonuses come from the middle score of three attributes.   For example, AC bonus is not DEX, but the middle score of CON, DEX, and WIS.  So, for example, if your min/maxer's CON, DEX, and WIS modifiers were 0, 5, and -1, your AC modifier would be 0.  "Physical" saves - typically a DEX or CON check for 5.0 - are the middle bonus of STR, DEX, and CON.  Mental saves are the middle score of INT, WIS, and CHA.  You can still dump some stats, but it creates a much more complex web of useful ability scores.

5.0's idea of all saves being tied to different attributes is also a good deterrent, as others have mentioned.
I don't understand why min-maxing is a problem. They are choosing to make specialized characters. Is there a problem with them optimizing their characters? 

If they choose to make specialized characters what happens when they are outside of that speciality? Do you feel that your players are ruining your fun by min-maxing? 
In the creating characters document there's already an array. The same array that the pregens are made from, so that's probably the best array to use for pure testing reasons.

Second I can't see any problems with my players min maxing. It does nothing to me as a dm. My job is to make a fun game... Not to win anything. If you feel they are too powerful for your challenges and everyone is bored around the table then increase the difficulty.
I don't understand why min-maxing is a problem. They are choosing to make specialized characters. Is there a problem with them optimizing their characters? 

If they choose to make specialized characters what happens when they are outside of that speciality? Do you feel that your players are ruining your fun by min-maxing? 



I'm inclined to agree here - personally i would have a chat with the players about the issue (if you really see it as being a big issue) and suggest other alternatives. If the players still want their min/maxed characters, and its not a deal breaking issue for you i would just let them have it.

You might be surprised how receptive they may be towards a more 'organbic' approach, after all a lot of players and DM's fall into a habit or style of play and so it remains unless somehow they are given a jolt into trying something new.