How to make due with level differences?

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What options do we have whenever one player in the group is a few levels higher or lower than the rest of the group? There's a player in the game I've been playing that is a few levels above us, which makes him effectively steal the show. Is there anything we can do short of having the DM pull some strongs?
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Firstly, I must ask, why is this PC higher level than the rest of the party?

Secondly, to answer the specific question, probably not.  The DM should not have permitted that to occur, for precisely the reason you specify.
Having a player 1-2 levels higher shouldn't be enough for them to steal the show.  Sure they'll be more effective, but it's not as though the rest of the party will just be standing by watching.  If it's causing an issue then you really are best to get your DM involved.

The way that I solve this as a DM is to give a 50% XP bonus to anyone that is below the max level of the group.  As XP targets for lower levels are also lower, they catch up pretty quickly.  I don't give XP to PCs whose players aren't at the session, so every now and again a player that attends regularly will get ahead of the rest of the party by a level for a session or two, which I think is a fair reward.

Many DMs keep everyone in the party on the same XP, which avoids this altogether and makes tracking XP a lot easier to boot.  Other DMs don't use XP at all and just let everyone level when they feel that they've earnt it.

It might be worth having a friendly discussion with your DM to see if he/she is willing to try one of the above.
Seconding 'why is he higher level'?

Ask the DM to make everyone the same level for expediency's sake.  it'll be easier on him, too.
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Basically what the others have said "Why is he higher level?" That sounds like a bad plan.  If it is because he has been playing longer and you all started at one, then shame on your DM.
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The groups I play with have had things like bonus xp for really good roleplaying or bonus xp for session writeups.  These are both nice xp bonuses and if you happen to be behind in xp can get you caught up.  With the writeups typically it goes to who ever wants to go through the bother of doing it, but if you are nudging higher then the rest of the group you let the others have first shot.  These might be things that could help the group catch up  (and are motivators to good playing too)

It makes a big difference in how the pc is getting ahead in levels.  If they are playing the same pc in the same group in different campaigns where everyone else is doing different characters that isn't cool.  If they are running off getting into stuff on their own and leaving the party twiddling it's thumbs that's also not so cool.  Otherwise a lot of the was they could be advancing faster happens as part of life and schedules. 
Talk to the DM and let them know that you are feeling overshadowed by the other person being higher level; if there is some 'bad form' going on they may be able to nip it in the bud otherwise they may be able to put options for bonus xp out for the rest of the group, if there is a big gap they might be able to suggest the player bring in a substitute pc for a half dozen sessions till things even out a bit.  Just docking the other player a few levels or arbitrarily adding levels to the rest of the group is not fair though.

If it is a level or two it isn't a huge impact but should get dealt with soon.  Keep in mind that (t least in 3.x) the xp required to level increased as you get higher in level, so as long as the group stays close it would self correct to an extent.
..."window.parent.tinyMCE.get('post_content').onLoad.dispatch();" contenteditable="true" />If it is a level or two it isn't a huge impact but should get dealt with soon.  Keep in mind that (t least in 3.x) the xp required to level increased as you get higher in level, so as long as the group stays close it would self correct to an extent.



Furthermore, if one is using the 3e XP system, it has an auto-correct feature in the math; a character who is lower level than another will receive more XP from an encounter.
How do you make due with level differences?  Ideally, you don't. 

The game works far better when all player characters are the same level and advance at the same rate.  Encounters are easier to balance, and no player has to feel like they are lagging behind.  4e DMG gives this advice outright, and keeping levels even is the intent of 3e's xp normalization math.
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Ill recomend dropping XP, and simply setting everyone to the same level. Then level when the group feels it is approperiate. Its a lot easier, and avoids this problem. 


(Instead of extra XP give out "Rerolls" on failed checks)

"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"                               " As usual, Krusk comments with assuredness, but lacks the clarity and awareness of what he's talking about"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"        "Wow, thank you very much"

"Your advice is the worst"                                                  "I'd recommend no one listed to Krusk's opinions about what games to play"


Ill recomend dropping XP, and simply setting everyone to the same level. Then level when the group feels it is approperiate. Its a lot easier, and avoids this problem. 


(Instead of extra XP give out "Rerolls" on failed checks)




(I've tried to type this response in 3 times.  Hopefully 4th time is a charm)

That may work in groups where you are the DM.  However I get the strong implication that he is a player in this game. 
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Talk to your DM about alternate goals in combat. If it's something that the higher-level character should do, then the lower level ones can fend of the monsters. If the monster is too tough for the weaker characters, then they can be the one accomplishing the primary goal.  For example. The key is having more than one thing going on.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

Talk to your DM about alternate goals in combat. If it's something that the higher-level character should do, then the lower level ones can fend of the monsters. If the monster is too tough for the weaker characters, then they can be the one accomplishing the primary goal.  For example. The key is having more than one thing going on.



Or be the same level and still do that.  Because it really sucks to always be the guy relegated to the "easy task" at table.  Having alternate win conditions should be part of your sig Centauri, but it isn't the only solution to every combat problem.  A good solution, but not the only.
Currently working on making a Dex based defender. Check it out here
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Need a few pre-generated characters for a one-shot you are running? Want to get a baseline for what an effective build for a class you aren't familiar with? Check out the Pregen thread here If ever you are interested what it sounds like to be at my table check out my blog and podcast here Also, I've recently done an episode on "Refluffing". You can check that out here


That may work in groups where you are the DM.  However I get the strong implication that he is a player in this game.



Players can recomend and push for house rules.

"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"                               " As usual, Krusk comments with assuredness, but lacks the clarity and awareness of what he's talking about"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"        "Wow, thank you very much"

"Your advice is the worst"                                                  "I'd recommend no one listed to Krusk's opinions about what games to play"

Speaking for myself, if I had the higher level character, I'd be willing to voluntarily delevel to make things easier for my group.
Talk to your DM about alternate goals in combat. If it's something that the higher-level character should do, then the lower level ones can fend of the monsters. If the monster is too tough for the weaker characters, then they can be the one accomplishing the primary goal.  For example. The key is having more than one thing going on.



Or be the same level and still do that.  Because it really sucks to always be the guy relegated to the "easy task" at table.  Having alternate win conditions should be part of your sig Centauri, but it isn't the only solution to every combat problem.  A good solution, but not the only.



Precisely.  the PCs are supposed to be equal teammates, not 'Bob and the Sidekicks Three'.
In my regular pathfinder game I only allow a max of one level difference between pcs.  If a player falls behind for whatever reason they get to level up so that ther only one level behind.  Even one level difference can sometimes show a power difference between character, particularly at low levels.

Its no fun bein relegated to little more than torch bearer of the group. 

This thread really shows the problem of using XP as an award (and maybe of using XP at all).  XP is a party reward not a personal one (especially in 4e).  If the DM wants to reward players for good RP or creative play, which I great support, there are other ways than with XP. 


I prefer things like a free success on diplomacy/intimidate/streetwise for very good RP.  Other things I would give out for creative playand good RP: a free reroll on an attack or damage roll (second result stands), bonus to next saving throw or skill check, or even a free action point or a free recharge of a daily utility.


There are lots of ways reward good play without unbalancing the party.  What thing have other out there given or received for good RP or creative play?  Do you give them out regularly or only when something is really special?  


TjD

What thing have other out there given or received for good RP or creative play?  Do you give them out regularly or only when something is really special?  

TjD




My reward is two-fold: bonus XP and the opportunity to re-roll dice.  I have a bag of (plastic) gold coins, each player gets one at the start of each session.  Players can get more for good RP, knowing to use the right skill at the right time, and even for extraordinary feats in combat.  The player can save the coins he/she gets for bonus XP at the end of the session (all coins are pooled, bonus XP is calculated and divided equally throughout the party), or a player can give a coin back and reroll a die (typically a d20), the only conditions are no rerolling on d20 1s and no rerolling to confirm crits.

the bonus XP part used to be individually distributed and that worked in past groups because the players were all appromixately the same knowledge and skill level - the coin distribution balanced out over time.  But in the latest group I am DMing for, I had a couple of veterans and several newbies.  The vets were getting all the coins.  So we talked about it and one of the vets suggested we pool the XP bonus.

 

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The cool thing is, you don't even NEED a reason to say yes.  Just stop looking for a reason to say no.
Talk to your DM about alternate goals in combat. If it's something that the higher-level character should do, then the lower level ones can fend of the monsters. If the monster is too tough for the weaker characters, then they can be the one accomplishing the primary goal.  For example. The key is having more than one thing going on.

Or be the same level and still do that.  Because it really sucks to always be the guy relegated to the "easy task" at table.  Having alternate win conditions should be part of your sig Centauri, but it isn't the only solution to every combat problem.  A good solution, but not the only.

  Precisely.  the PCs are supposed to be equal teammates, not 'Bob and the Sidekicks Three'.

Who said anything about the primary task being the "easy task"?

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.


This thread really shows the problem of using XP as an award (and maybe of using XP at all).  XP is a party reward not a personal one (especially in 4e).  If the DM wants to reward players for good RP or creative play, which I great support, there are other ways than with XP.



I agree.  XP is essentially a pacing mechanism; you need to undertake X encounters of Y difficulty, with X and Y inversely proportional, before you gain a level.  It is by and large unnecessary.
This thread really shows the problem of using XP as an award (and maybe of using XP at all).  XP is a party reward not a personal one (especially in 4e).  If the DM wants to reward players for good RP or creative play, which I great support, there are other ways than with XP.

I agree.  XP is essentially a pacing mechanism; you need to undertake X encounters of Y difficulty, with X and Y inversely proportional, before you gain a level.  It is by and large unnecessary.

Well put. Because the game is trying to emulate a certain style, it's full of pacing mechanisms. Attack rolls, damage, and HP are pacing mechanisms as well and, in certain circumstances, can be dispensed with.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

This thread really shows the problem of using XP as an award (and maybe of using XP at all).  XP is a party reward not a personal one (especially in 4e).  If the DM wants to reward players for good RP or creative play, which I great support, there are other ways than with XP.

I agree.  XP is essentially a pacing mechanism; you need to undertake X encounters of Y difficulty, with X and Y inversely proportional, before you gain a level.  It is by and large unnecessary.

Well put. Because the game is trying to emulate a certain style, it's full of pacing mechanisms. Attack rolls, damage, and HP are pacing mechanisms as well and, in certain circumstances, can be dispensed with.

Players could simply remain at level 1 and never improve. Problem solved. Instead of giving XP they could give attack bonuses. More powerful spells. Better saving throws. Special abilities. Oh wait. That's what XP does.
A rogue with a bowl of slop can be a controller. WIZARD PC: Can I substitute Celestial Roc Guano for my fireball spells? DM: Awesome. Yes. When in doubt, take action.... that's generally the best course. Even Sun Tsu knew that, and he didn't have internets.
This thread really shows the problem of using XP as an award (and maybe of using XP at all).  XP is a party reward not a personal one (especially in 4e).  If the DM wants to reward players for good RP or creative play, which I great support, there are other ways than with XP.

I agree.  XP is essentially a pacing mechanism; you need to undertake X encounters of Y difficulty, with X and Y inversely proportional, before you gain a level.  It is by and large unnecessary.

Well put. Because the game is trying to emulate a certain style, it's full of pacing mechanisms. Attack rolls, damage, and HP are pacing mechanisms as well and, in certain circumstances, can be dispensed with.

Players could simply remain at level 1 and never improve. Problem solved. Instead of giving XP they could give attack bonuses. More powerful spells. Better saving throws. Special abilities. Oh wait. That's what XP does.

Goodness, you just don't get it. Good bye.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

If he's way too high level, it does cause some problems. Remember the animated Beowulf? His whole crew was torn to shreds before he ever woke up from his drunken stupor. Not cool for those guys.

Is he high enough level to have a cohort or followers? Let him play one of those if he has one. They probably need some personality anyway. Something other than... "My cohort cleric heals me. My cohort wizard teleports me to where I want to go. My cohort dwarven expert just made me some awesome armor as a gift! My cohort fighter tastes the wine before I buy it."

I tend to throw mixed encounters and focus more on role-playing than combat when the party is widely spaced in levels. The high-level guy is faced off with a long drawn out fight with the leader while the other characters deal with his numerous minions. Sometimes it can't be helped. The high level guy steals the show in some situations. Focus on letting the low level guys have a chance to do the one thing they're really good at. The high level guy can't be in two places at the same time.

You can also split the party. This takes some skill as a director. Just before a fight, just after a fight. Just as the party comes to a strange rune-covered door. Right after the sphinx asks a crazy riddle... give the players a moment to think, in other words.

Try not to put them in environments where the low-level guys can't possibly survive, such as the elemental plane of fire, for instance.

As a player, I don't mind the challenge. It's especially gratifying when your low level guy outshines some epic guy because of clever playing. The low level rogue who manages to evade a pit-fiend's meteor swarm and then tricks the devil into making a terrible mistake, the low level paladin who leads the terrasque onto a dam that can't support his weight, washing the beast out into a steep ravine, the level 1 mage who gets a critical hit with a ray of frost on a wounded salamander in time to save his high level companion from being crushed and burned to death. These are all heroes of legend. No guts no glory.
A rogue with a bowl of slop can be a controller. WIZARD PC: Can I substitute Celestial Roc Guano for my fireball spells? DM: Awesome. Yes. When in doubt, take action.... that's generally the best course. Even Sun Tsu knew that, and he didn't have internets.
This thread really shows the problem of using XP as an award (and maybe of using XP at all).  XP is a party reward not a personal one (especially in 4e).  If the DM wants to reward players for good RP or creative play, which I great support, there are other ways than with XP.

I agree.  XP is essentially a pacing mechanism; you need to undertake X encounters of Y difficulty, with X and Y inversely proportional, before you gain a level.  It is by and large unnecessary.

Well put. Because the game is trying to emulate a certain style, it's full of pacing mechanisms. Attack rolls, damage, and HP are pacing mechanisms as well and, in certain circumstances, can be dispensed with.

Players could simply remain at level 1 and never improve. Problem solved. Instead of giving XP they could give attack bonuses. More powerful spells. Better saving throws. Special abilities. Oh wait. That's what XP does.

Goodness, you just don't get it. Good bye.


Not much to get.

If you mean rewards such as honors, titles, a peak in the high wizard's spell book, a gift from the high priest, something as simple as an honorific, such as Sir John the Valiant... yes I get that.

If as a pacing mechanism, you mean the DM can say when levels are gained, I get that too. The point system itself is arbitrary, but using the point system as a gauge, the DM sets the pace.  Most players can see the relationship between getting XP and getting more powerful. They can see that getting BONUS XP is a reward... a pretty darn good one. Without XP, the characters are kind of in limbo about it.

To say that XP is a problem as a reward mechanism... there's been nothing said here to support that. It's not always the best reward, granted... but it's a good default. I'll go on a limb and say it's a good default for most DMs and players.

But what you said:
Because the game is trying to emulate a certain style, it's full of pacing mechanisms. Attack rolls, damage, and HP are pacing mechanisms as well and, in certain circumstances, can be dispensed with.

Have you turned this into yet another "Heroes should never be in danger" argument? Yeah. I don't get that.
A rogue with a bowl of slop can be a controller. WIZARD PC: Can I substitute Celestial Roc Guano for my fireball spells? DM: Awesome. Yes. When in doubt, take action.... that's generally the best course. Even Sun Tsu knew that, and he didn't have internets.
Talk to your DM about alternate goals in combat. If it's something that the higher-level character should do, then the lower level ones can fend of the monsters. If the monster is too tough for the weaker characters, then they can be the one accomplishing the primary goal.  For example. The key is having more than one thing going on.

Or be the same level and still do that.  Because it really sucks to always be the guy relegated to the "easy task" at table.  Having alternate win conditions should be part of your sig Centauri, but it isn't the only solution to every combat problem.  A good solution, but not the only.

  Precisely.  the PCs are supposed to be equal teammates, not 'Bob and the Sidekicks Three'.

Who said anything about the primary task being the "easy task"?




Sorry it took me a bit to respond to this, I missed this thread until Crowe mind-vomited in it.

The problem is not whether the task is easier or not, it is the perception of that task.  If the higher level character is doing something different from the lower level characters, even if the lower level task is harder it is seen as them being sidekicks to the "heroic" character. 
Currently working on making a Dex based defender. Check it out here
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Need a few pre-generated characters for a one-shot you are running? Want to get a baseline for what an effective build for a class you aren't familiar with? Check out the Pregen thread here If ever you are interested what it sounds like to be at my table check out my blog and podcast here Also, I've recently done an episode on "Refluffing". You can check that out here
This thread really shows the problem of using XP as an award (and maybe of using XP at all).  XP is a party reward not a personal one (especially in 4e).  If the DM wants to reward players for good RP or creative play, which I great support, there are other ways than with XP.

I agree.  XP is essentially a pacing mechanism; you need to undertake X encounters of Y difficulty, with X and Y inversely proportional, before you gain a level.  It is by and large unnecessary.

Well put. Because the game is trying to emulate a certain style, it's full of pacing mechanisms. Attack rolls, damage, and HP are pacing mechanisms as well and, in certain circumstances, can be dispensed with.

Players could simply remain at level 1 and never improve. Problem solved. Instead of giving XP they could give attack bonuses. More powerful spells. Better saving throws. Special abilities. Oh wait. That's what XP does.



Or you can just say 'we level up now' without worrying about the annoying accounting issues.
Talk to your DM about alternate goals in combat. If it's something that the higher-level character should do, then the lower level ones can fend of the monsters. If the monster is too tough for the weaker characters, then they can be the one accomplishing the primary goal.  For example. The key is having more than one thing going on.

Or be the same level and still do that.  Because it really sucks to always be the guy relegated to the "easy task" at table.  Having alternate win conditions should be part of your sig Centauri, but it isn't the only solution to every combat problem.  A good solution, but not the only.

  Precisely.  the PCs are supposed to be equal teammates, not 'Bob and the Sidekicks Three'.

Who said anything about the primary task being the "easy task"?




Sorry it took me a bit to respond to this, I missed this thread until Crowe mind-vomited in it.

The problem is not whether the task is easier or not, it is the perception of that task.  If the higher level character is doing something different from the lower level characters, even if the lower level task is harder it is seen as them being sidekicks to the "heroic" character. 

Put some keoghtom's ointment on that sensitive skin.

Level Differences Stink, But You Don't Have To!

Many are the problems that having characters with level variations can present. The low level guys have a high mortality rate and certain environments are impossible for the peon to endure. The high level guys get to be the heroes, and the low level guys tend to become sidekicks. Hopefully I might present for you a variety of possible solutions.

Some will tell you that getting rid of XP entirely is the solution. I disagree. Using XP as a gauge of success, while not the only solution, has been the default solution since the earliest days of role-playing games and many players see XP as a meaningful reward system. Many DMs also find that having XP as a reward system allows them to encourage type of play that they makes the game more enjoyable for them.

One out-of-the-box solution is to keep everyone at the same level through the whole campaign. It is an unusual solution, which I thought of in jest. Even so, it's so crazy it just might work, but dramatically changes the way the game is played.

However, I believe the current problem is that your existing characters within the campaign are varied widely in their level of power. Some players might feel like sidekicks. The challenges that the high level character can handle easily require more clever tactics for the lower level character who typically has less options.


Some of the challenges are absolutely impossible for low-level characters to handle. Outer Plane adventures in which a low level character absolutely can not survive, such as the typical plane of fire should be avoided.

Other challenges are nearly impossible. A terrasque, for instance, has powerful combat abilities. Worse, it is able to outwit your average player. Only a fast horse or slow friends will allow for a chance to escape. A fast horse with a brave level 1 rider on it can lure the monster away from its path toward the city it is making a bee-line for. That should be worth some XP AND a key to the city... good for one free beer. If the EPIC guy wants to chase it down and hack and slash at it, let him. I'm going to get that free beer.

There are quite a few non-combat situations where being an epic level barbarian doesn't necessarily help as much as being able to read ancient Zjizza'arrian runes (whatever they are). Find skills unique to the low levels. Make them important to the story so they have a REAs.

A simple solution is to simply split the party. I know this goes against the old code of everybody stick together, but parties split all the time. It's only a matter of knowing when to cut back to the other group. Both characters can be working on the same problem. One group may be diplomatically asking for help fighting an approaching monster horde, while the other group is actually in the trenches with the monsters.

Another solution is to let the players play cohorts and followers if they are of a higher level than the main character they would normally play. It has the added benefit of giving personality to the cohort, which is often nothing more than a pack-mule for the main character.

There are two competing philosophies on this subject. One philosophy is that no character should EVER, under any circumstances, actually be challenged. It is an unorthodox approach that some find enjoyable. I call this the nothing-really-matters philosophy. It's not one for me, but it seems to be growing in popularity. I have no examples of this philosophy in action, so I will leave that to its adherents to espouse its virtues.

Another philosophy is that the players might actually enjoy this chance at overcoming difficult challenges. I call this the no-guts-no-glory approach. It's not for the faint of heart apparently, but some have found it more rewarding. It is an approach that goes back to the great philosopher Og of the Big Cave (9,594 BC - 9,571 BC). One day, he killed a mammoth, WAY beyond his level as far as challenge ratings. He was rewarded with food and finally gained the notice of a certain Unga of The Small Cave, who was the belle of the ball among the Unga-Bunga Cave People. There is one particular group of people who have found a certain satisfaction with accomplishing great things despite adversity: nearly everyone.

To summarize:
1 - Changing the entire tradition of having level differences is an option requiring all characters to be of the same power always which is game balance taken to an extreme. I don't recommend this one.
2 - Make challenges and obstacles that are not level dependent, but require role-playing instead. This is an easier, more implementable solution.
3 - Eliminate impossible-to-survive situations that low-level characters simply can not overcome no matter how clever they are.
4 - Split the party, even if that goes against the "prime directive". This is the most easily implementable solution and is doubly good because phone addicts can check their phone messages between scenes.
5 - Play cohorts or followers if they are higher level than the main characters, if the players are agreeable.
6 - Eliminate ALL challenges so that levels don't matter. This is a back-door approach some use. I have used the approach myself. It is called deus ex machina, the equivalent of superman swooping in at the last minute to catch the crossbow the almost took out the main character. I found that players tend to resent the intrusion, but others have found greater success with the technique. I don't personally recommend it.
7 - An experienced or particularly clever player can overcome more challenges than you might realize. Some might actually appreciate the challenge. Few people remember an epic-level character killing random orc number 2. But a level 2 rogue defeats a pit-fiend with a cloak? This I gotta hear! If the player is willing to shoot for the moon, don't close the window.
A rogue with a bowl of slop can be a controller. WIZARD PC: Can I substitute Celestial Roc Guano for my fireball spells? DM: Awesome. Yes. When in doubt, take action.... that's generally the best course. Even Sun Tsu knew that, and he didn't have internets.
This thread really shows the problem of using XP as an award (and maybe of using XP at all).  XP is a party reward not a personal one (especially in 4e).  If the DM wants to reward players for good RP or creative play, which I great support, there are other ways than with XP.

I agree.  XP is essentially a pacing mechanism; you need to undertake X encounters of Y difficulty, with X and Y inversely proportional, before you gain a level.  It is by and large unnecessary.

Well put. Because the game is trying to emulate a certain style, it's full of pacing mechanisms. Attack rolls, damage, and HP are pacing mechanisms as well and, in certain circumstances, can be dispensed with.

Players could simply remain at level 1 and never improve. Problem solved. Instead of giving XP they could give attack bonuses. More powerful spells. Better saving throws. Special abilities. Oh wait. That's what XP does.



Or you can just say 'we level up now' without worrying about the annoying accounting issues.

What I found is that if a character gains a bunch of levels at once, he/she doesn't get a chance to 'grow into' them. And without a gradual change, becomes a totally different identity.

A lowly but ambitious wizard who sucks up to higher level wizards is a different character than one who is now an archmage.

If the players and DM can make that work for them, then 'catching up the party' is a great solution.

I did this once and the players involved didn't mind... he wanted to jump in with his epic character... not to lord it over the party but because he really wanted to play the character. I presented a story line that he had just had a major battle with an energy-draining creature and is currently weakened. He played the character with a bunch of negative levels and I tied in getting his levels back as part of the existing quest. Fun was had by all.
A rogue with a bowl of slop can be a controller. WIZARD PC: Can I substitute Celestial Roc Guano for my fireball spells? DM: Awesome. Yes. When in doubt, take action.... that's generally the best course. Even Sun Tsu knew that, and he didn't have internets.
..."window.parent.tinyMCE.get('post_content').onLoad.dispatch();" contenteditable="true" />If it is a level or two it isn't a huge impact but should get dealt with soon.  Keep in mind that (t least in 3.x) the xp required to level increased as you get higher in level, so as long as the group stays close it would self correct to an extent.



Furthermore, if one is using the 3e XP system, it has an auto-correct feature in the math; a character who is lower level than another will receive more XP from an encounter.

true
A rogue with a bowl of slop can be a controller. WIZARD PC: Can I substitute Celestial Roc Guano for my fireball spells? DM: Awesome. Yes. When in doubt, take action.... that's generally the best course. Even Sun Tsu knew that, and he didn't have internets.
Crowe the main reason I said "mind vomiting" was not because I was offended.  I just don't read what you say most of the time so it takes a while to scroll past all your double, triple or quadruple  posts that clutter up the thread.  You also have a habit of completely ignoring your previous posts, and their responses, in favor of something new and shiny.  So rather than it being a statement of "this is what I believe in order to further the discussion" your posts seem, to me, to be "Here is what I was thinking when I read this" and then you ignore everything else about it.
Currently working on making a Dex based defender. Check it out here
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My Dms never give out exp but levels whenever they feel we should level during the campaign. Its much easier than tracking exp and ensures we are all on the same level. 
IMAGE(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y152/RockNrollBabe20/Charmed-supernatural-and-charmed_zps8bd4125f.jpg)
My Dms never give out exp but levels whenever they feel we should level during the campaign. Its much easier than tracking exp and ensures we are all on the same level. 

I don't like doing this, but it's what I've wound up doing simply because I don't like the chore of tracking experience and I don't want the players to have to wait too long to level up.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

My Dms never give out exp but levels whenever they feel we should level during the campaign. Its much easier than tracking exp and ensures we are all on the same level. 

I don't like doing this, but it's what I've wound up doing simply because I don't like the chore of tracking experience and I don't want the players to have to wait too long to level up.


Its just the way our DM does things. We seem to level up pretty frequently but none of the DMs in our group like tracking exp. They just give out levels when they think we should. I can see why people would not like that. 
IMAGE(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y152/RockNrollBabe20/Charmed-supernatural-and-charmed_zps8bd4125f.jpg)
My Dms never give out exp but levels whenever they feel we should level during the campaign. Its much easier than tracking exp and ensures we are all on the same level. 

I don't like doing this, but it's what I've wound up doing simply because I don't like the chore of tracking experience and I don't want the players to have to wait too long to level up.



We've also taken this tactic with my game. It helps keep everyone at the same level, and we do have players who may wander in for a game or two and then be unable to attend for a while, so they don't fall behind and there is no disparity in level.

We sometimes level when we go through a story arc and there is a natural progression point. I've also talked with the players if I felt there was a reason to not level up, such as moving into a published adventure and trying to keep with those levels. It's a little less work for me in those cases, and the players understand that. If they get itchy for a new feat or ability, we look at leveling. Honestly, it is one of the most laid back games I've ever run, and we are having a blast with it.
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