Best Deck Color For Beginners.

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I want to get into MTG and some friends told me that the different colors have different difficulties. I want to know which card color is the best for newbs. Srry if this doesn't go here i'm new.
All colors can have pretty damn complicated decks, but blue usually got a higher chance to have complicated decks/cards.

If you want straight forward, green or red it is.
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What do you recommened Red or Green?
 
Aggro is the most straight forward strategy
red, green and white are the colors that do that best (roughly in that order)

of course, depending on the card pool any color can play pretty much any strategy
proud member of the 2011 community team
What do you recommened Red or Green?
 

red if you want spells, green if you want big creatures, white if you want small creatures

again, only a rough guide
proud member of the 2011 community team
What do you guys think about black?
 
lately black has gotten pretty aggressive with its zombies
but personally I think of black as more of a control color
proud member of the 2011 community team
So I should go with Red?
Also what do you guys think of the 2013 toolkit? 
sure
or you can go with what is known as "dirty red", which is red with a splash of black

here is an article about it
it is a very inexpensive deck and pretty straightforward, so it should be perfect for a new player


the 2013 toolkit is fine to buy once for new players
it will give you enough lands to build multiple decks, and some other goodies
an alternative would be a Fatpack from RTR, which also comes with lots of land
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i think newer players do better with red. you have creatures and  spells that help you interact with other players. 
both r/g and r/w look like it's going to be strong with gatecrash.
However, if you are going to be playing competitively, playing more than one color virtually requires buy dual lands which can be expensive 

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Personally I dont think you can say there is one beginner strategy, even aggro can be complicated at higher levels of play.  Pretty much any deck is going to have more depth then you are going to be fully taking advantage of when you first start out.  But thats ok, because you are just starting to learn how to play.

I mean sure, you dont want to hand some completely new player a Storm combo deck or expect them to pilot a Doomsday stack, but telling them they wont be able to handle a control deck is just wrong imo.

I honestly think this natural urge to just shove new players towards aggro strategies instead of having them experiment and figure out how they enjoy playing the most is harmful to the game as a whole.

 

but aggro is the best way to learn, because it is mostly straight forward

if you want to start out with a complicated control or combo deck, go for it, but the learning curve is much much steeper that way

once the player is familiar with the game through his aggro deck he can then branch out
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Aggro is the most straight forward strategy
red, green and white are the colors that do that best (roughly in that order)



It makes me sad how much Black has fallen off the Aggro train, all because of the long-ago-stopping-printing of what was once its defining card (Dark Ritual).


When I started playing, black was THE aggro color.
but aggro is the best way to learn, because it is mostly straight forward

if you want to start out with a complicated control or combo deck, go for it, but the learning curve is much much steeper that way

once the player is familiar with the game through his aggro deck he can then branch out


I think it depends on the control build. Sure, a new player won't be able to pilot a control deck at 100% efficiency, but a new player can't pilot anything at 100% efficiency right away.

One of the earliest decks I remember running was all the removal I could find and a handful of questionable creatures. It wasn't good, but it was fairly simple to run and a good deal of fun.

The biggest issue with control is that it's harder for the opponent to give you tips on what you did wrong later because they can't be certain what you had and when you had it. With aggro mistakes are easier to spot and thus learn from. Frequently a control deck will lose a game long before it's actually over thanks to either responding to the wrong threat or failing to respond to the right threat. 
Immature College Student (Also a Rules Advisor)
I don't know, black's still very aggro. I mean, it's not t1 Dark Ritual, Hypnotic Specter, t2 Black Knight, t3 Necropotence aggro, but what about a 2/2 for one mana isn't aggro?

Anyway, it depends on what you want. I'd say red/white might be a good beginning set, though: Red provides removal for small things, and white provides removal for large things. Cards in these colors tend to be cheap in mana cost, and it's possible to build a winning monored deck for less than $20. Also, combine green or white with black or red, and you've got a two-color pairing that can destroy any permanent type.
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Aggro is the most straight forward strategy
red, green and white are the colors that do that best (roughly in that order)



It makes me sad how much Black has fallen off the Aggro train, all because of the long-ago-stopping-printing of what was once its defining card (Dark Ritual).


When I started playing, black was THE aggro color.

When was this? I'm not trying to be snide; I'm actually interested. Every time I can think of black having a good aggro deck, there has at least been a comparable if not better aggro deck in other colors.

When Necro-black was big, Sligh was quicker.
When Buried Alive was big, Stompy was bigger.
When Sui-Black was big, Dead Guy Red was ending games in a fury.

And so on. I really can't think of a time when black aggro was just BETTER than another aggro deck in the format. Maybe Black Summer before Sligh became a big thing?
Red/green aggro with at least one combo thrown in.

There is no reason to not learn the rules correctly to begin with, doing it the right way removes so much hassle unlearning stuff you learned wrong.

Have a printed out turn structure, have a priority arrow with three settings ; no one, player one and player two.

Magic is a very complicated game and many concepts are hard to grasp on the fly. Just like you cannot understand matter without understanding electricity and cannot understand electricity without understanding matter, there are several parts of magic that have a strong chicken or egg first problem. Trying to learn it by osmosis is the worst way possible (and yet how many of us do).
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When was this? I'm not trying to be snide; I'm actually interested. Every time I can think of black having a good aggro deck, there has at least been a comparable if not better aggro deck in other colors.

When Necro-black was big, Sligh was quicker.




Yeah, it was pre-Sligh... I mean, first turn Ritual-Hypnotic Specter, or Ritual-BlackKnight-BlackVise, was a start that usually got the opponent's head to drop eight inches before the first draw.  At the time no other color was apt to put out that immediate a threat on the first turn - the best any other color could do on turn one was Savannah Lions, which really wasn't the same.


Then, my exposure to the global meta was a little limited then so it may have been largely local-meta groupthink.
...
There is no reason to not learn the rules correctly to begin with, doing it the right way removes so much hassle unlearning stuff you learned wrong.

Have a printed out turn structure, have a priority arrow with three settings ; no one, player one and player two.
...



This is actually an incredibly good idea, though some may believe it is beneath them to do so.

However, I find that many people who have played for years still dont properly understand some of these most basic interactions since the game usually just skips over them with shortcuts.  Then whenever any situation comes up thats slightly outside of the ordinary, they are left completely lost because they never learned the actual rules to begin with.

 

Quick tip : Attack first play after. There's 2 main phase, one before the attack phase and one after the attack phase, attacking with all your mana available will make me suspicious. If you attack with a 2/2 and I have 2 times a 1/1 on the field and you got all your mana available, I might hesitate to block with both my 1/1 since you could have a lightning bolt in your hands to kill one of my creatures if I decide to block with both, thus making me lose both creatures. While on the other hand, if you dont have any mana left, I know that I can block that 2/2 with both my 1/1 and exchange.

There's exceptions to this rule like if something would boost your attacking creatures like undead warchief, but most of the time, you are better off playing during the second main phase.

Also if you have enough lands on the field to cast everything and you draw a card and it's a land, keep it in your hand, you can bluff with it... if you draw a second land, make sure that you play the second one and keep the original one in your hand. Those mind games will make you win some games eventually or make them do mistakes.

One last thing, try to keep your mana open for stuff, even if you dont have it in your hand, like when I play a blue/green deck with counterspell, I'll try my best to always have 2 islands untapped if I still have cards in my hand. People might be hesitant to play a big spell even if you dont have a counterspell in your hands since they know you might have one, they might play a lesser yet strong card, that you got a higher chance to handle before they play their biggest card, giving you time to actually draw that counterspell.
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The best color overall is probably white. It can do pretty much everything and can give you access to anything you need.
The best color overall is probably white. It can do pretty much everything and can give you access to anything you need.



There's no "better" color and if there was, it wouldnt be white, I'd be blue.
I love trolls Dont hate me because I'm blunt and you cannot handle it
The best color overall is probably white. It can do pretty much everything and can give you access to anything you need.




There's no "better" color and if there was, it wouldnt be white, I'd be blue.


I meant for beginners, obviously. That is the topic of this thread.

It has some of the most efficient and aggressive weenies, really good fatty beatsticks, lots of strong keyword abilities to learn and take advantage of, possibly the best and widest range of removal and is well balanced with everything a new player would need to learn the fundamentals of the game. Blue, for example, is very powerful but a little less complete - counters are very effective but limited as removal goes and the colors more powerful mechanics are a little bit more abstract. Black can be aggressive and easy to pick up but less complete in the sense that, despite the strength of its creature removal, it really can't touch most of the major card types at all. Things like enchantment and artifact removal, in my opinion, are extremely important to introduce new players to because they demonstrate very technical and powerful concepts of understanding the interactions between cards and between colors and being prepared both for tooling your deck and for predicting the tools of your opponent. It's an aspect of the game that new players or their teachers often pass over and it can lead to frustration or hamper the new player's development. Of course they may not pick it all up right away, but they still need to be shown.

it depends more on the player and less on the experience IMHO. Does the beginner like elves, angels, goblins, merfolk or zombies? Does the player like saying no to other players, destroying other's toys, lifegain, burn, or land and nature types of effects

I'm just saying that different players are drawn to different things. I agree that aggro decks are the easiest way to learn the basics of the game but as for what color you play I would base that more on the player's tendancies.
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1) I have no idea what the he*l you guys are talking about.
2) I like mythical Reptilian Creatures and attacking whenever I can. 
1) I have no idea what the he*l you guys are talking about.
2) I like mythical Reptilian Creatures and attacking whenever I can. 



1- Maybe magic isnt the thing for you
2- Lorescale coatl?
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2) blue green snake tribal
it can be done and is quite exotic ;)
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1) I have no idea what the he*l you guys are talking about.
2) I like mythical Reptilian Creatures and attacking whenever I can. 



1- Maybe magic isnt the thing for you
2- Lorescale coatl?



1) That is why I'm on this form, to learn Magic.
2) Any Reptiles. ex: Dragons, Drakes, Snakes, Humanoid Lizards. 
for Dragons you should go red (or if you want multicolor go to Jund ())
for Drakes you should go blue
for Snakes and Lizards you should go blue/green

as I said, Snake tribal is a possible deck
it is a bit complex for a new player, but you should be fine
from those choices it would be the one I'd play
proud member of the 2011 community team
I prefer straightforward monocolored decks for beginners, and when asked to teach someone, will hand them a monogreen deck (ramp into fat via sorceries, creatures, and maybe auras, then have a few instants for combat tricks).  It helps to know the deck well enough to be able to tell the person, "if you have an instant card in hand, specifically X or Y, then now might be a good time to play it."

My key has been to keep one or two "training" decks on hand of each color, preferably of comparable strength, that contain competent land quantities and mana curves, while providing a taste of what the colors do.

Just remember to prompt the new player with comments like, "if you have X in your hand, now might be a good time to play it."  This is doubly so when handing over the blue deck which should contain some hard counters (Cancel is great for a training deck) and bounce.  Related to this is explaining why YOU make the choices you do during play - when to play/not play specific cards, why you swing or hold back, why you go out of your way to keep certain colors of mana available... in teaching, this method is called a "think aloud."  It works in classrooms, it works in teaching people the fine points of Magic: they learn WHY and WHEN to do things, not just to do them.   

With enough effort, a set of 5 thought-out training decks can illustrate all of the evergreen terms while highlighting each color's strengths, weaknesses, and tendencies.   Be sure to highlight black's life-as-a-resource and forcing discards, blue's draw and countermagic, red's burn and haste, green's ramp and fat, and white's sweeping (both board-clearing and one-sided pumping) and life gain (attached to useful cards, please, not for its own sake); all while incorporating the major tribes of each color, extra drawing capabilities, and the assorted creature abilities (first strike, hexproof, etc.).

Then when the beginner is ready to build their own deck, supervise their "breaking down" of whichever training deck they enjoyed the most - this provides a strong visual of mana curve, consistency, and land quantities as well as leading into conversations about deck elements (threats, answers, enablers).  Conversations on card evaluation is also likely to come from this method.  One method I have used in the past is to build the decks on a 3-2-1 ratio (up to 3 of a specific common, 2 uncommon, and 1 rare or mythic).  While inconsistent to a degree, it does keep the training games interesting through variety AND when the decks are broken down it makes it easy to show the power of running multiples.

Advanced "training" decks include milling and one or two other alternate win decks (Coalition Victory can be fun), as well as multicolor decks to illustrate gold and hybrid, as well as to better emphasize the loss of tempo in playing EBT lands vs. nonEBT lands.

Cap the lesson(s) with the printed out turn-order chart, as well as ACCURATE play and rules.  Houserules and shortcuts are well and good, but TOURNAMENT rules need to be taught first.  Otherwise, you are setting your student up for embarrassment and maybe even DQ when they attend an FNM.

Cheers!
A shout out to Gaming Grounds in Kent, Ohio and Gamers N Geeks in Mobile, Alabama. www.zombiehunters.org for all your preparation needs. http://shtfschool.com/ - why prepping is useful, from one who has been there.
I'm new as well and LOVE the black zombie decks. I'm slowly working my way playing a multi color deck and looking to build one. If you have xbox or PS3 I highly recommend trying Duels of the plains walkers Magic 2012 and 2013. You get a great feel for the game and have a decent selection of cards you can learn to play. Also you can play and unlock many diffrent decks to see if you like playing them. Then you can hit the local fantasy shop and purchase those same cards and build your deck. Just my two cents...
When I first started, I found white to be pretty straightforward, though I can't exactly say why. With some experience behind me now, I'd imagine green is the most straightforward color overall for beginniners - the typical monogreen deck is just ramp and summon big creatures.

Having said that, with the cards available these days, you can make very straightforward decks in any color. 
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for Dragons you should go red (or if you want multicolor go to Jund ())
for Drakes you should go blue
for Snakes and Lizards you should go blue/green

as I said, Snake tribal is a possible deck
it is a bit complex for a new player, but you should be fine
from those choices it would be the one I'd play



Also red has viashino (similar to lizardmen)

viashino runner or viashino fangtail for example.
Don't be too smart to have fun
When I get a littled more experienced, would a Red/White Deck be good?
if you wait until GTC, that's when the Red/White guild (Boros) will get new cards

it looks to be quite good for a weenie aggro strategy, that should suit a new player
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Would the Red cards from Mob Rule work well with the White cards from Sole Domination?
Odric will work very good with the Boros keyword, that also requires at least 3 creatures to attack
Krenko will give you those attackers

so I guess it could be a start
proud member of the 2011 community team
Any kind of color combination is good. Look at the back of a magic card, choose one color, the 2 colors adjacent to it are his allied colors and the ones opposed to it are the enemy colors. Allied colors will have more cards combination possible since there's a bigger card pool, but there's no way that means that with the 15,000+ cards printed that the other colors dont have good interactions either.

EX : White is allied with blue and green and enemy with red and black, it just means that there's less white/red and white/black cards than white/blue and white/green.

You can choose any duo of colors and you can make a deck with ease.
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Any kind of color combination is good. Look at the back of a magic card, choose one color, the 2 colors adjacent to it are his allied colors and the ones opposed to it are the enemy colors. Allied colors will have more cards combination possible since there's a bigger card pool, but there's no way that means that with the 15,000+ cards printed that the other colors dont have good interactions either.


In a normal year this would be true. Right now though, with Ravnica as the current location, it really isn't. One of Ravnica's 'things' is that all color combinations are treated equally with no preference given to ally over enemy. 
Immature College Student (Also a Rules Advisor)
I'm gonna say that as a beginnner, look more to diff strategies than color. Once you've decided on a strategy, then find a color that excels at it. I'd recommend aggro simply because it'll give a good intro to combat, which is involved to some degree in almost every deck strategy out there. From there, you can branch off into other strategies, such as graveyard manipulation, coutermagic, burn, etc...
Any kind of color combination is good. Look at the back of a magic card, choose one color, the 2 colors adjacent to it are his allied colors and the ones opposed to it are the enemy colors. Allied colors will have more cards combination possible since there's a bigger card pool, but there's no way that means that with the 15,000+ cards printed that the other colors dont have good interactions either.


In a normal year this would be true. Right now though, with Ravnica as the current location, it really isn't. One of Ravnica's 'things' is that all color combinations are treated equally with no preference given to ally over enemy. 



Yes there's 15,000+ different cards being printed this year
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