Wizard Spellbook: Feedback please?

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I haven't played a wizard before: could you guys tell me how I ridiculously off-track I am for having an effective spell advancement plan?

I'm thinking that I would specialize in Conjuration at the expense of Evocation and Enchantment.

It seems like I could ban Enchantment fairly easily, as there are entire categories of monsters with immunities (undead, plant, construct, etc...) to the school's enemy-negative spells, and most of the same party-positive spells seem like they could be supplied, at least to some degree, by Bards, Clerics, Paladins, etc...

Also, if I end up with a Rogue or two in my party, I would not want to ban Illusion (Greater Invisibility), even with the extra summoned monster/level every day.

If I am understanding the level progression: with an INT of 16, I would start with knowing 3 Level-1 spells + 3 for INT bonus, and then gain 2 at each level after that, with the maximum spell level increasing with every odd-numbered class level (until 9 at 17).

Levels 1-2 (INT 16, max spell level 1)

  1. Expeditious Retreat

  2. Feather Fall

  3. Jump

  4. Magic Weapon (Conjuration, could be used as daily bonus)

  5. Mage Armor (C)

  6. Mount (C)

  7. Reduce Person

  8. Summon Monster I (C)


Levels 3-4 (16, max 2)



  1. Cat's Grace

  2. Command Undead

  3. False Life

  4. Summon II (C)


Levels 5-6 (16, max 3)



  1. Dispel Magic

  2. Haste

  3. Ray of Exhaustion

  4. Summon III (C)


Levels 7-8 (16-17, max 4)



  1. Greater Invisibility

  2. Remove Curse

  3. Secure Shelter

  4. Summon IV (C)


Levels 9-10 (17, max 5)



  1. Break Enchantment

  2. Dismissal

  3. Summon V (C)

  4. Teleport (C)


Levels 11-12 (17-18, max 6)



  1. Greater Dispel Magic

  2. Overland Flight [5]

  3. Summon VI (C)

  4. Undeath to Death


Levels 13-14 (18, max 7)



  1. Spell Turning

  2. Greater Teleport (C)

  3. Summon VII (C)

  4. Waves of Fatigue [5]


Levels 15-16 (18-19, max 8)



  1. Banishment [7]

  2. Mislead [6]

  3. Moment of Prescience

  4. Summon VIII (C)


Levels 17-20 (19, max 9)



  1. Control Undead [7]

  2. Discern Location [8]

  3. Disintegrate [6]

  4. Finger of Death [7]

  5. Project Image [7]

  6. Refuge (C) [7]

  7. Summon IX (C)

  8. Waves of Exhaustion [7]

Founder - but not owner - of Just Say Yes!

Member of LGBT Gamers

Odds are, if 4-6 people can't figure out an answer you thought was obvious, you screwed up, not them. - JeffGroves
Which is why a DM should present problems to solve, not solutions to find. -FlatFoot
Why there should be the option to use alignment systems:
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If some people are heavily benefiting from the inclusion of alignment, then it would behoove those that AREN'T to listen up and pay attention to how those benefits are being created and enjoyed, no? -YagamiFire
But equally important would be for those who do enjoy those benefits to entertain the possibility that other people do not value those benefits equally or, possibly, do not see them as benefits in the first place. -wrecan (RIP)
That makes sense. However, it is not fair to continually attack those that benefit for being, somehow, deviant for deriving enjoyment from something that you cannot. Instead, alignment is continually attacked...it is demonized...and those that use it are lumped in with it.

 

I think there is more merit in a situation where someone says "This doesn't work! It's broken!" and the reply is "Actually it works fine for me. Have you considered your approach might be causing it?"

 

than a situation where someone says "I use this system and the way I use it works really well!" and the back and forth is "No! It is a broken bad system!" -YagamiFire

It's not bad to plan out the spells you gain for free, but remember that you can always learn additional spells for a relatively modest cost, so you really want to put your free ones towards the highest-level spells possible since buying access to lower-level spells is cheaper.  Ultimately, you'll use Boccob's blessed book to make the whole arrangement cheaper and more convenient (the cost of the book is easily made back by not having to pay the scribing costs).

It's good to see that you've got the summon monster spells in there, given their versatility, and things like greater invisibility and greater teleport are likewise fundamentally useful.  The exact pick of spells is from a massive array with a lot of possibilities (more than I could easily cover here), but it's really more important to make sure that you're looking beyond your free spells, since access to that huge range of possibilities is a major advantage for you compared to classes like the sorcerer.

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Co-Author of the Dreamfane, Euralden Eye, Gajuisan Crawler, Gruesome Lurker, Fulminating Crab, Ironglass Rose, Sheengrass Swarm, Spryjack, Usunag, and Warp Drifter, and author of the Magmal Horror from Force of Nature.

My most popular campaign item; for all your adventuring convenience.
Zauber's Mutable Rod: This rod has a number of useful functions that make it easier to live in the wilderness. It is made of polished wood, with five studlike buttons on one end. Each button produces a different effect when pressed. Unless otherwise noted, the rod’s functions have no limit on the number of times they can be employed. When button 1 is pressed, one end of the rod produces a small flame, equivalent to a candle. When button 2 is pressed, the rod unfolds into a two-person tent, complete with bedrolls and warm blankets. When button 3 is pressed, the rod becomes a one-handed hammer, suitable for pounding pitons into a wall. When button 4 is pressed, the rod becomes a sturdy iron spade. When button 5 is pressed, the rod becomes a wooden bucket able to hold 2 gallons of liquid. Once per day, it can be commanded to fill with fresh water. If the rod is seriously damaged or broken in any of its alternate forms (button 2, 3, 4, or 5), it reverts to its basic rod form and cannot be activated for 24 hours. Moderate conjuration; CL 9th; Craft Rod, minor creation; Price 375 gp; Weight 2 lb.
I'm thinking that I would specialize in Conjuration at the expense of Evocation and Enchantment.

OK well this is a good start. As much as I am actually a fan of Evocation, it is one of the easiest to drop, whilst Conjuration is a good one to get bonus spells in.

It's not bad to plan out the spells you gain for free, but remember that you can always learn additional spells for a relatively modest cost, so you really want to put your free ones towards the highest-level spells possible since buying access to lower-level spells is cheaper.

This. You don't want to waste the chance to learn a high-level spell on learning a lower-level one unless you really don't want anything at that level.

What sources are you allowed? The Spell Compendium opens up your options massively.
Well, when I made the list: I was just looking at dandwiki.com's list from the SRD as a place to start, I hadn't found dndtool.com's more comprehensive lists, and I'd forgotten that wizards can also learn from each other's books in addition to the freebies. I'm realizing that the list is a bit more superficial than I thought, especially given how easy it sounds to learn non-freebies.

I'm thinking about updating at some point, after going through the bigger spell lists, to show which spells I would want to get for free at each set of levels and which ones (of the same level) I would want to learn from someone instead of using up freebie spaces at the next levels. Would that be a good idea?

Founder - but not owner - of Just Say Yes!

Member of LGBT Gamers

Odds are, if 4-6 people can't figure out an answer you thought was obvious, you screwed up, not them. - JeffGroves
Which is why a DM should present problems to solve, not solutions to find. -FlatFoot
Why there should be the option to use alignment systems:
Show
If some people are heavily benefiting from the inclusion of alignment, then it would behoove those that AREN'T to listen up and pay attention to how those benefits are being created and enjoyed, no? -YagamiFire
But equally important would be for those who do enjoy those benefits to entertain the possibility that other people do not value those benefits equally or, possibly, do not see them as benefits in the first place. -wrecan (RIP)
That makes sense. However, it is not fair to continually attack those that benefit for being, somehow, deviant for deriving enjoyment from something that you cannot. Instead, alignment is continually attacked...it is demonized...and those that use it are lumped in with it.

 

I think there is more merit in a situation where someone says "This doesn't work! It's broken!" and the reply is "Actually it works fine for me. Have you considered your approach might be causing it?"

 

than a situation where someone says "I use this system and the way I use it works really well!" and the back and forth is "No! It is a broken bad system!" -YagamiFire

Yeah, probably.

There are also some good spell guides knocking around here. Search Wizard handbook.

If you don't want to focus on actual summoning, I would suggest putting in some more offensive options, too. Grease at L1 is a great spell, and I would consider something like Glitterdust as a good dual-use spell at L2. I also like Blur or Mirror Image for defence but Cat's does give you an AC bonus as well as a bonus to ray attacks. Enlarge Person is another good L1 one which you may not want for yourself, but your Fighter buddy might appreciate. At L3 you already have Dispel and Haste which are two of the more popular ones.

The fact that you can scribe spells into your book means that you can take Summon Monster spells and spells like Cat's Grace which may become redundant later (when you get your Gloves of Dex, say) with impunity, knowing that you will have other spells in your spellbook by then to memorise.