3.5 wizard and eidetic memory

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so my players used wish to remove themselves from a curse that makes everyone forget about a location.
 i thought a suitable downside to this wish is that the characters are unable to forget anything ever.
i plan on having a lot of fun with memories and hallucinations of combat at inoppertune times.
unintended consequence ... The party has a wizard. Did I just remove the need for a spell book? Can she casta complex spell simply having watched someone else cast it?  What effects can having spells permanently etched in your brain have on a character?
 
57189838 wrote:
It may be late to post this suggestion, get a small booklet and write PC Rules on the front, and then inside start making up PC Rules to counter DM rules. Remember to use Ink, it's official if it is in Ink. If he says "it is DM's rules" then consult your PC rulebook for an appropriate rule such as "When the DM is railroading you then a PC may transfer to a train of his own choosing" ... ...If cash isn't an issue, have your rules Notorized, ussually this only costs about $20 or so a page, obviously Notorized rules will trump his rules, and most courts of law would agree, plus think of the entertainment value of presenting these rules to a Notary Public.
so my players used wish to remove themselves from a curse that makes everyone forget about a location.
 i thought a suitable downside to this wish is that the characters are unable to forget anything ever.
i plan on having a lot of fun with memories and hallucinations of combat at inoppertune times.
unintended consequence ... The party has a wizard. Did I just remove the need for a spell book? Can she casta complex spell simply having watched someone else cast it?  What effects can having spells permanently etched in your brain have on a character?
 

You didn't necessarily do anything. Some consistency is nice, but the rules are not the laws of physics.

Ask your players what they think the effect should be. Maybe they can have fun with a wizard with infinite spells, and not just steamroll everything. Maybe they can come up with a fun, balancing affliction for the wizard to have. Maybe the wizard becomes like a 4e Wizard: he is able to prepare fewer spells, but some of them he retains, and some of them come back to him after a short time resting.

[N]o difference is less easily overcome than the difference of opinion about semi-abstract questions. - L. Tolstoy


 Well, if the party's high enough level to have somehow gotten hold of a Wish or similar effect...

 1 -  I'd allow the character to be able to cast any of the 0-level cantrips that he knows without the need to memorize them - much like the sorcerer, he simply has a certain number of spell slots per day and chooses what to cast when he casts it.
 Alternately (or possibly even in addition), allow the caster at the beginning of every day to pick a number of them equal to his number of 0-level spell slots per day and then make them once-per-round extraordinary abilities.

2  - Also, roll randomly to pick (or have the player choose) one 1st-level attack spell he knows. That spell has now become an extraordinary ability, useable once per round. However, when using that spell as an extraordinary ability, any level-dependent effects such as damage dice or DC are always considered to be 1st level (i.e., Magic Missile only get's one projectile, etc.)...

 3 - I'd also roll 1d4 or1d6 and pick that many of the least-used (and/or possibly least useful) spells in the mage's spellbook. They definitely need to be either potentially interesting or at least amusing, though.
Alternately, assign a number of spells equal to the character's INT mod.
 The wizard can now cast each of those spells once per day (or perhaps a limited number determined by level) as an extraordinary ability, similar to how certain races like gnomes and drow have the ability to cast a limited number of spells. (They can also still memorize additional castings in their spell slots if they really want to...)

 Although it does little to nothing to increase the wizard's overall power level, these suggestions do provide them much more flexibility and helps them avoid the standard dilemma of having to choose between "combat" and "non-combat" stuff when allocating their daily resources.
 NOTE: They also don't really give the wizard any extra goodies for being a wizard compared to the non-spellcasters, who should also get some benefits from the wish.
 For most non-casters, giving them an additional (4 + Int mod) skill points to spend and a permanent +2 to any Intelligence-based skill checks would probably be a good idea.



 If you're looking to add some shenanigans to liven things up, then the character's eidetic memory sometimes causes unmemorized spells to spring to mind when he casts a memorized spell - whenever the character casts a spell (up to INT mod times per day) they can choose to roll a D20 and subtract the level of the spell just cast.

 - If the total is an even number, the spell slot occupied by the spell just cast is now occupied for the rest of the day by a randomly determined 1st-level spell from their spell list.

 - On an odd total, the spell slot is now filled with a random 2nd-level spell from their list.

 These spells are cast normally, but are considered to be of the level of the slot they occupy (i.e., if you cast a 5th-level spell and it is replaced by acid arrow, then that casting of acid arrow is considered a 5th-level spell for all purposes.)
These spells only occupy those slots until the wizards rests - when he wakes up, any "recalled" spells are lost and he must fill those spell slots with his regular spells.

  This should spice things up without being overpowered, since the wizard controls when to re-energize his spell arsenal but not what he gets.

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I am the Magic Man.

(Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.)

 

I am the Lawnmower Man.

(I AM GOD HERE!)

 

I am the Skull God.

(Koo Koo Ka Choo)

 

There are reasons they call me Mad...


 Random additional thought...

 From a narrative point of view, the fact that the party remembers everything allows you to occasionally introduce campaign information without the party needing to talk to an NPC or do research in some library, and gives you the option of including the less socially-oriented characters in the process...
For example, when the party finds a mention of some lost tomb or something in a book, the name of the tomb causes the party fighter to recall a long-ago night in a bar somewhere during which he overheard one or more people discussing the place, or perhaps there was a drunken bum mumbling to himself about it. Since the fighter was drunk and not really paying attention to some half-heard whispers, he only recalls certain bits and pieces he accidentally overheard, and you can decide just which clues and facts you want to feed to the party.

Show

I am the Magic Man.

(Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.)

 

I am the Lawnmower Man.

(I AM GOD HERE!)

 

I am the Skull God.

(Koo Koo Ka Choo)

 

There are reasons they call me Mad...

The party has a wizard.
Did I just remove the need for a spell book?
Can she casta complex spell simply having watched someone else cast it?  
What effects can having spells permanently etched in your brain have on a character?
 



Short answer: A wizard preps her spells with the use of her book, meaning part/most of the spell is cast during preptime, and only the last little bit is cast in combat. Thus:

1) Probably. If you decide that the player can memorize all of the prep and perform it perfectly without the use of a book, then yeah. However, the player would probably still need to prepare them once each the 'old fashioned way' to memorize the process.
2) No. Another wizard will still have to prep their spells. The pc will only see the last little bit and will not know what prep went into it.
3) Whatever you want, but realistically nothing. I mean, that's just the day in the life of a sorc or warmage...

FWIW [4e designer] baseline assumption was that roughly 70% of your feats would be put towards combat effectiveness, parties would coordinate, and strikers would do 20/40/60 at-will damage+novas. If your party isn't doing that... well, you are below baseline, so yes, you need to optimize slightly to meet baseline. -Alcestis