A question concerning skill progression

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Hey everyone!

I'm excited and slightly overwhelmed by all the new stuff in D&D Next, and I'd especially like to ask you guys a question about skill progression and whether I've understood using skills correctly.

So basically trying to do a task untrained is d20 + relevant ability mod
Trying to do a task with training is d20 + relevant ability mod + skill die

How is skill progression represented? I understand that the bounded accuracy mentality means to homogenise the DCs of tasks so that you don't have to scale them up to suit the party's level but how do you make something inaccessible to low-level characters?

Using video games as a comparison, let's say I'm trying to do a Fallout-type scenario, e.g. a locked room with goodies in it that I don't want falling into the hands of the PCs too early. In Fallout this would be accomplished by placing a really high DC on the door that couldn't be opened until the player is skillful enough in lockpicking. How would you do this in D&D Next without leaving it up to the dice to decide. If I place a high DC on the door, how will the PCs develop their skills to match the door if their skill level only increases via ability mod increase and progressively larger skill dice? With a static skill stat I can see what the players need to roll to accomplish the task but it's not so clear-cut with the ability mod and two separate dice forming the total.

I must have missed something but I'd be very gratetful for any advice.

Thanks!

This is the problem with the bounded accuracy system. Since if you go by numbers alone, given enough time, the low level characters can accomplish most things. I think the simplest solution is really just DM intervention. Our DM doesn't judge the success of a skill check by numbers alone. He will usually grant someone more success if they are trained and get a roll of 15 than if they are untrained and got a roll of 15. So even if the DC might be 15, the DM sometimes requires a trained character to complete it.

Though the problem still remains with characters who are low level and trained accessing high level areas through lucky rolls. If they get REALLY lucky, hell, just let em go at it. But if you want to limit them, throw in some additional requirements besides just rolling high enough. This is really where roleplaying comes in. Are they trying to pick a door to the royal treasury? The level 3 rogue is trained, sure. Can he meet the DC? Within 2 or 3 rolls, probably. But does he have the knowledge and experience of this kind of lock? Does this door require something more than just a standard thief's kit? And if you really really need to, make stuff up. Though that can be seen as somewhat of a dickmove. Always try to have a reasonable way for something to be accomplished.
The main question I would ask in the scenario presented is, why would you put your awesome goodies behind a single locked door? The value of the thing being sealed away should be kind of linked to the effort to go to in order to get it. And I don't mean make the numbers higher. I mean put the door at the top of a cliff face, now they gotta climb or fly to get there, make it a puzzle door, and they need specific key pieces to get it open, or sufficient magic or force to be able to penetrate the wards.

The larger your skill die, the higher your statistical probability of rolling over any given DC. The math of the game actually works very, very well. For example, with 1d20+1d4+4 at level 1 I have a 12.5% of making a DC 25 skill check. Meanwhile, with a 1d12 and a +5 at level 20 I have a 37.5% of making the same skill check. Basically, higher sized skill dice is how your skill progression is represented. Some feats can give you extra bonuses. Meanwhile, as a DM, you should set DCs based on the descriptions that the game gives to any given DC. And, try not to place any difficult DCs on a skill check that the PCs must pass in order to move the story forward—every quest should have multiple avenues to success. 


The main question I would ask in the scenario presented is, why would you put your awesome goodies behind a single locked door? The value of the thing being sealed away should be kind of linked to the effort to go to in order to get it. And I don't mean make the numbers higher. I mean put the door at the top of a cliff face, now they gotta climb or fly to get there, make it a puzzle door, and they need specific key pieces to get it open, or sufficient magic or force to be able to penetrate the wards.

Thanks for the answers! This is not an actual situation I'm constructing right now but rather I was wondering in general how this could be accomplished.

I wouldn't put all my awesome goodies behind a single door but I'm interested to know whether I can add 'replay value' (for lack of a better term) to an area. I want to clarify that I'm not letting plot-centric events depend on this but let's say I wanted to stash a few healing potions, a wand, or just plain ol' gold as a small side-quest sort of thingy that the players can access when they've got the skills for it. I don't want to be a dick and not give them what they deserve but I'm also cautious of making everything accessible, if I were to create an open world where the PCs can go wherever they please. I have to hide the good stuff somewhere and I'd hate for them to stumble upon it too early. :D

Aaaanyhoo, thanks for the input so far! This has given me food for thought and more suggestions/workarounds are always welcomed with open arms.
Cassmi ~ it seems your question has been answered but I thought I'd weigh in anyway. 

1. You could always layer the access to various areas with a wider variety of required DC's. or rquiring multiple success (i.e. > 4 stage locking mechanism) This will decrease the likelihood of characters stumbling upon goodies too soon. 

B. I give circumstance bonuses for skill checks. Rarely more than +2. It may throw the numbers off balance but I don't think its too much of a problem.

Ω . I would prefer dice with bonuses rather than die size increases.