Best Roleplay-heavy adventures?

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Can anyone suggest a few good adventures that: A) feature lots of NPC interaction, role-play opportunities, and skill based encounters; and/or B) require players to get creative and think outside the box to solve delimmas? 

I would prefer ones downloadable though D&D Insider or LivingForgottenRealms. There is one LFR adventure titled "Good Intentions" that is supposedly a murder mystery that is roleplay heavy, but I haven't been able to find the download. Third party adventures would be OK also.

Do you guys have any favorites? 
The Keep on the Shadowfell. Seriously. There are tons of NPCs in there. Just up the personalities and interactions. Play up the needs of the town and everyone's goals, including the monsters. Roleplaying, after all, is not the same as "non-combat."

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

Can anyone suggest a few good adventures that: A) feature lots of NPC interaction, role-play opportunities, and skill based encounters; and/or B) require players to get creative and think outside the box to solve delimmas? 

There is one LFR adventure titled "Good Intentions" that is supposedly a murder mystery that is roleplay heavy, but I haven't been able to find the download. 

'ELTU3-1 Good Intentions' is on the livingforgottenrealms.com main page (towards the bottom). It can also be downloaded from this link.

Other good RP adventures:
DALE1-6 The Vesperin Initiative
NETH3-2 Flirting with Disaster
WATE1-2 Dark Secrets of Downshadow
QUES1-1 Black Cloaks and Bitter Rivalries
CORE2-1 Killing the Messenger
You could also add a lot more investigation to CALI 4-3 Desert Below, Dragon Above.  The whole mystery behind that one got blown a little early for my liking, but the actual story is pretty decent.  I also love RPing the WeavePasha as a crotchity old man.
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Madness at Guardmore Abbey is fantastic. Many of the encounters have noncombat solutions (RP and skill challenges included).
Thanks MVincint, I've already downloaded a few of those and checked them out.


The Keep on the Shadowfell. Seriously. There are tons of NPCs in there. Just up the personalities and interactions. Play up the needs of the town and everyone's goals, including the monsters. Roleplaying, after all, is not the same as "non-combat."



Basically the reason I asked is because my players have told my my games are too much combat for them, and they want more roleplaying. I'm just looking for good inspiration because writing those types of things are harder for me.

I don't usually run published adventures but i've been known to adapt them heavily or steal ideas from them.
Basically the reason I asked is because my players have told my my games are too much combat for them, and they want more roleplaying. I'm just looking for good inspiration because writing those types of things are harder for me.

Clarify exactly what they want, because roleplaying is just players doing what their character would do, in or out of combat.

The reason people feel like they can't act in-character during combat (and thus roleplay in combat) is that they believe doing so would expose them and the other players to the risk of losing their characters. Instead, they feel they have to act tactically, making choices their characters might not make, just to stay alive.

As the DM, you have some ability to disconnect combat from that risk of uninteresting failure. Try to make failure more interesting, as interesting as, say, failing in a conversation, and you'll find your players roleplaying in combat.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

I ran Blood Money (Dungeon #200 level 7-9) recently with my group, which was about saving a town from a mercenary army by stealing the payroll from a castle.    It was my second adventure as DM, and the first for our group that wasn't combat oriented, but it went well.   I found running a caper to be significantly harder than a combat encounter, I think mostly because of the cast of characters I had to manage/play.
  I added a couple encounters, because as written it had none ... our wizard got too clever and flirty with a barmaid, triggering an assasination attempt (jealous spymaster/boyfriend).  The wizard actually died, but he wanted to make a new character anyways so it worked out.  The party also ran into some ropers in an underground passage.

Infernal Wrath (Dungeon #205, level 4-6) is about tracking a serial killer (tiefling who's sold his soul to a succubus to get the power to avenge his brother's death).  It had some good moral quandries for my lawful good(x2) / good / unaligned players. 

Both of these have a target level, but they'd be pretty easy to adjust to whatever level you need.