Responding to your own spells?

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I've been reading through the Comp Rules for a spot to explain it in detail but I have yet to find clarification.

I often get this...

I attack with Glistener Elf. My opponent chooses not to block. At the end of declare blockers I cast Giant Growth, my opponent does not respond. So I cast another giant growth before my first one resolves.

Is this correct? Or, does my first one resolve then I cast the second.

Essentially, can I respond to my own spell on the stack even if my opponent does not respond?

Confusing but I'm trying to figure out this technicality.
Yes, you can respond to your own spells. In fact, you get the first chance to do so. Whenever a spell is cast or an ability is activated, the player who did so gets priority first afterwards. If you pass and your opponent passes too, your spell will already resolve.

But usually the smarter play is to let the first Giant Growth resolve before casting the second.
Awesome, thank you. I had figured as much. I just got jumbled in the text that talks about priority. A few more read throughs and I should be fine. 

Suddenly things are making more sense xD
..."window.parent.tinyMCE.get('post_content').onLoad.dispatch();" contenteditable="true" />I attack with Glistener Elf. My opponent chooses not to block. At the end of declare blockers I cast Giant Growth, my opponent does not respond. So I cast another giant growth before my first one resolves.

In case it isn't clear from the previous answer, you can't do this. If you give your opponent a chance to respond, you have passed priority. If your opponent then declines to respond, he has also passed priority and the top object on the stack resolves (your Giant Growth). You can then cast the second Giant Growth if you want, but on an empty stack, not in response to the first one. (Which is usually the smarter way to do it anyway, in this case, but in some situations it won't be.)

If you want to respond to your own spell or ability, you can, but you must do it right away, before you know if your opponent is going to respond; otherwise, if your opponent doesn't respond, you don't get another chance. (If your opponent does respond, you can of course respond to that response, and so on.)

Jeff Heikkinen DCI Rules Advisor since Dec 25, 2011