Dungeon, Overland Maps and Technology

9 posts / 0 new
Last post
  What technologies do you use to create maps for use in dungeons or the overworld?


   I guess at this point I'm more interested in overland. I'm looking to rehaul some hand drawn maps from the mid 1980s that I drew for my campaign. While they have gotten a few redraws over the years, it would be nice to use some existing technology with interesting fractal coastlines and other cool features. I think what inspired this is seeing Chris Perkins maps from Iomandra. Any input would be awesome.


 
    
Currently running a playtest, weekly, online D&D Next Session using a virtual table system called roll20.
I don't always use electronic means to create overland maps, but when I do, I use hexographer.

So if you like hex maps, that is a possibility.
Thanks for the pointer. Certainly reminds me of the FR boxed set I owned in the late 80s. 
Currently running a playtest, weekly, online D&D Next Session using a virtual table system called roll20.
Thanks for the pointer. Certainly reminds me of the FR boxed set I owned in the late 80s. 

I would check out cartographersguild.com.  They're dedicated to it over there, with lots of tutorials available for different programs.
Also, Maptools is great for making maps as well.
RIP George! 4-21-11 RIP Abie! 1-2-13
Funny Forum Quotes
[quote author=82733368 post=532127449]
58115148 wrote:
"You notice a large piece of mold clinging to your toothbrush. What do you do?" "I cast Fireball." "I run like hell!
63797881 wrote:
The standard d4 is somewhat (SOMEWHAT) rounded on the top, the older models are even flat. The Lego is shaped in such a way that in an emergency, you can use one as a makeshift surgical knife.
147742801 wrote:
57457938 wrote:
My wife asked me if her pants made her look fat. What do you think I said?
Wife: Do these pants make me look fat? RedSiegfried: I just killed a bunch of orc women and children.
63797881 wrote:
82733368 wrote:
28.) Making a "Drunken Master" style character (Monk or otherwise) does not require my character to be completely shitfaced, no matter what the name (and fun interpretation) implies.
29.) Making a "Drunken Master" style character does not require ME to be completely tanked, no matter how "in-character" I want to be..
cartographersguild is a good resource. They have a couple of software packages there linked.
Maptools - - - of course!


I've also started just crafting by hand in gimp. Using a fractalized path to help with coastlines and the like. I'm mostly happy with how it has turned out so far. Still a lot that could be done.
Currently running a playtest, weekly, online D&D Next Session using a virtual table system called roll20.
If you have the ability, I think the best way is to draw it in a program like gimp or photoshop. Idealy with a tablet. If you make it really high resolution, you can include lots of details you can't do by hand. Make sure you estimate the size you want the file to be, and check your computer can open, save, and save it without issue. You can then take the file to a kinkos, office depot, staples, etc and get it printed. It's around $15 for a 32''x20'' color print.
I ended up doing things by myself in gimp. It is certainly the most professional map I've ever created. I simply can't believe there aren't some more automated methods of doing this. I plan to make a few scripts to help me make maps in the future via gimp. Perhaps once things are automated the 'sameness' forces the whole thing to collapse under its own weight and thus doing it yourself is the only way - I don't know.
Currently running a playtest, weekly, online D&D Next Session using a virtual table system called roll20.
If you get those scripts figured out I would love if share them. Map making would be much easier if you could draw a general curve for a coastline and have it generate the wiggles for you. Depending on how it's coded, you might even be able to adjust the "roughness" of the coastline, and how often things like bays appear.
Sign In to post comments