Coolest magic Item

Whats the coolest magic item that you have run into and why was it cool?

For me it may have been this giant bag of neverending rope. The party needed to get down this many thousand foot deep air shaft, so as DM I left a giant bag of rope up top. The bag was very heavy, 100 pounds, and the rope couldn't be cut, or the whole thing would lose its power. But you could pull as much rope (3/4" 3 strand hemp) as you needed or wanted. and the rope was magically strong enough to ignore its own weight. 

The party forgot all about the airshaft when they saw the rope, they figured out how to haul it out of the dungeon because they thought it was cool.

I think the limitations that it had were as much a part of what made it interesting as were its powers. 
Elves, Gates, Book-binding and Doom On the Rocks: Breaking rules and lichen maps Is character development killing exploration in our games?
 THere was a 2nd ed magical item that was a magical bathtub complete with hot water and bubble bath.

 Fear is the Mind Killer

 

There was a mirror in 3e that trapped one person that looked into it. If there was a person trapped, another person looking at the mirror would release the first.

We had some fun times with it, before just deciding it was too broken good and giving it to an npc.
 THere was a 2nd ed magical item that was a magical bathtub complete with hot water and bubble bath.


Oh that could be fun. I'm going to make one that looks like a giant witches cauldron and if someone gets in the hot water will get hotter and the cauldron will start producing random vegatables, like carrots and squash.
To me was a homebrew item called Hideous Healing Potion. What it did was to heal all your hit points, but it would render the user useless sick in pain for half an hour.
I think it was nice because I never liked the normal healing, this potion was like the common saying: no pain no gain.
It was once used on a monster so the PCs could escape while the monster was in pain.
After the first time used, we've used ever since in many campaigns.
Excellent: that one is also going in my notes! thank you.
Whats the coolest magic item that you have run into and why was it cool?

Two intelligent weapons from different campaigns.

Frosty: a dagger that dealt cold damage, but was a drunkard. The special scabbard had a channel into which the user would pour some sort of drinkable alcohol, and Frosty would only work when the alcohol was absorbed. When the dagger hit, not only did it do its normal damage, it injected the alcohol into the target. He was a mouthy SOB, too! The second thing that made this item really fun is that its owner, Allanon, was also a drunkard. The ranger did his best fighting when three sheets to the wind, and once had to sober up to give evidence in court. He said it was the worst week of his life.

The second -- well, let me post the "owner"s description. The "owner" in question is an archer, and you will see why I put "owner" in quotes:

Hedrules is a longsword +3, +6 vs Outsiders. It is intelligent and communicates by telepathy to it's wielder only. It has enough ego points to require an initial will check. (I think this was int+wis+cha+d20 vs about 45+d20) and additional checks any time you are in the presence of an outsider and not actively attacking with the sword. Hedrules does not have any senses of its own but if you can see, smell, or hear an outsider Hedrules will instantly recognize it. Hedrules will respond by psionically shouting "Outsider!  Attack! Attack!  Attack! Attack!  Attack! Attack! Attack! Attack!"  But it won't say "That's an Ice demon, kill it with fire" or even "That's a whosiwhatsis", because that would be treating you like a partner in it's outsider-hunting enterprise and Hedrules' attitude is more like you are the taxi driver.  If Hedrules wins an ego check it will "take the wheel and drive" for itself, relegating you to a position as a back-seat observer until all known outsiders have been destroyed.  At that point additional checks can be made until you regain control, which had better happen fairly soon because Hedrules is not interested in fleshly concerns like food, water or sleep. Or tactical considerations for self preservation.

Hedrules is uninterested in idle conversation, even about important topics like outsiders, because you are a mortal and it is a SWORD and how could you possibly know anything worth hearing anyway?  From behavior I would guess it has a lawful neutral alignment.  It will sometimes demand particular courses of action that it believes will allow it to attack outsiders, leading to "interesting" arguments. [Owner] rarely remembers that he doesn't need to vocalize during these arguments.

In memory of wrecan and his Unearthed Wrecana.

Nice =-) 

I haven’t actually been at a table that used any intelligent magic items. I’ve always kind of thought that they could be a lot of fun, in exactly the way you describe. But I think they are one of those things that get used in a long campaign with a regular group.


 I play shorter campaigns, but reading your descriptions I am now considering how to insert willful magic items. 

Deck of many things, hammer of thunderbolts, sphere of annihilation, vorpal swords, soulfire armor, bow of the solars, mirror of life trapping, mirror of mental prowess, tomes/manuals, ring of nine lives, cloak of arachnida... yeh, too many to list. Oh yeh, and any +x item is always awesome.
A figurine of wondrous power that turned into a snowy owl. It could basically only be used for scouting, but it couldn't speak, so the casters had to use speak with animal to find out what it saw.  But I had so much fun roleplaing as an owl, that the party sort of adopted it as a pet.  At one point the owl got shot with an arrow while scouting and the party was so incencsed, they essentially burned down an entire kobold encampment to find the archer, rather than their initial plan of just going stealthily around the encampment.

Eventually, the party got into a tight spot and had the owl sacrifice itself by setting off a trap that woud cover the party's escape.  I think one of my players actually teared up as I described the owl's last hoot before setting off the Symbol.
A figurine of wondrous power that turned into a snowy owl. It could basically only be used for scouting, but it couldn't speak, so the casters had to use speak with animal to find out what it saw.  But I had so much fun roleplaing as an owl, that the party sort of adopted it as a pet.  At one point the owl got shot with an arrow while scouting and the party was so incencsed, they essentially burned down an entire kobold encampment to find the archer, rather than their initial plan of just going stealthily around the encampment.

Eventually, the party got into a tight spot and had the owl sacrifice itself by setting off a trap that woud cover the party's escape.  I think one of my players actually teared up as I described the owl's last hoot before setting off the Symbol.



I have always been enamored with the figurines. Not sure why, I just read through their description in the DMG; they just have...something. Like they could exist in D&D and other worlds as well. maybe thats it, the feeling that they link D&D with more mundane places.
As a player:

1. Blackrazor (from White Plume Mountain) caused our party no end of trouble, but led to many, many fun situations.

2. The Prison of Zagyg (from Lost Caverns of Tsojcanth) was so very handy to have, and we managed to do some impossible things because of that artifact.

3. The Demonomicon of Iggwilv (also from Lost Caverns of Tsojcanth) was sort of the foundation of an amazing witch PC that I played in that same campaign.

4. A Cubic Gate - this was an item that led to many great adventures in the same Greyhawk/Planescape campaign that the above items were from. It was as much a collection of adventure hooks as it was a tool for the party.

 As a DM:

1. A simple sword called Mageblight that was +1/+2 vs wizards. I believe this came from the Basic D&D adventure "Escape from Thunder Rift" Nothing particularly special about the sword itself, but the player who had it always liked killing my NPC wizards and he made that sword awesome by his character's love for it.

2. A Horn of Blasting that same party used to great effect many times.

3. A medallion for one of my first campaigns sort of counts. The medallion itself was not magical, but it was a symbol that was used to identify friends to a golem in an early adventure of the campaign. The druid found the medallion and held it up to the golem, and the golem let him pass. The druid never seemed to realize that this was not a special power of the medallion, just a standing order for the goelm. Thereafter, this druid made sure that his first action in EVERY combat encounter was to hold up that medallion, hoping that his enemy would back down and let him pass. I started making phony saving throw rolls behind the screen just to keep his hopes up, but nothing ever, ever succumbed to the power of his powerless amulet - until at the end of the campaign, they found the lair of the same wizard from the first adventure, and another golem was there who had the same instruction. I have never seen a player so happy as that druid when he held up that medallion and the golem backed away and let him pass.
I played in a game where my character ended up with an intelligent sword that actually was a character the DM roleplayed. That was totally awesome.
An intelligent weapon that contained the soul of a legendary paladin. It was a great sword named Hammerknife, and its ego score was pretty big
My two copper.
Lifted from a play-by-post game somewhere, the Mask Knowlegeable. Basically a mask that gave the wearer his own personal at-will Identify spell (activated by touch), except the spell didn't apply to simply magic items. It'd tell what material a dungeon wall was created of, the precice age and origin of the (nonmagical) armor a foe was wearing, or translate words on a page.
The mask giving information to the wearer in the form of a bound knowlege spirit made things even cooler. 
An intelligent weapon that contained the soul of a legendary paladin. It was a great sword named Hammerknife, and its ego score was pretty big



They're such a pain to do but when they're done right... the one I had was called Salmis and she was the topic of that particular adventure. Every time we found another gem for the hilt she'd get more control over my character.

Dark Torch. This looked just like a regular everburning torch, except it had a blue purple and black flame. However, instead of giving off light, it turned bright light into shadows, and shadows into darkness, in a 20 foot radius. It even obscured dark vision as if it was shadowy. The holder of the torch could see as if it was a full torch (20 foot bright, 20 foot shadows). Just like an everburning torch you could put it in a bag to hide its effects.

It was our scouts favorite item. The wizard kept trying to learn the spell from it, and eventually learned he would have to destroy it in order to have a chance to learn how to cast darklight. He decided it was far too useful to destroy it and possibly not learn the spell.
In our AD&D campaign we have a magical Tent of Luxury that has food and water, that is much larger extradimensional space interior able to fit 10 humans + mounts etc... and there is a door to the Ethereal Plane in the back that occupant can use to cross planes. Also, there is a chance every nights that something comes out of it....

That's a fun cool item full of surprise and possibilities!

Yan
Montréal, Canada
@Plaguescarred on twitter

Whats the coolest magic item that you have run into and why was it cool?

I suppose this is a reflection on the kind of kid I was, but my favorite item back when I was reading the DMG cover to cover for the first time was the Rod of Lordly Might.  

 

 

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I still recall fondly the olden days of AD&D. When the kit book for Wizards came out, I feel in love with the Witch. I made a Warlock (male version, obviously).

Back then, the kit's special feature was that you got a nominal GP pool to spend on magic items at 1st level. I don't recall the amount exactly, but it was small enough that it mostly allowed for maybe a couple potions or something else very minor.

Then I saw that cursed items were "free". Ding! :D

I had a collection of poison potions, a necklace of strangulation, cloak of poisonousness, a scarab of death. A few other "trinkets".

Oh, but did I enjoy coming up with new and clever ways of using those things in my adventures...
In 2e the DM I was playing with had a booklet of magic items.  Not sure what it was or where it came from, but I'm pretty sure it was a third party booklet.  My ranger was given a sword from it for saving a barbarian village.  The named Rage.  It was +4, intelligent, and had some neat abilities involving aids in resisting fear and the like.  It was +0 magic with no abilities until you drew it across your arm for full longsword damage, then it gave you 2 temporary hit points per level and healed the wound, leaving a scar behind on your arm.  It then became +4 and screamed with rage as you swung it.  It was a very fun RP weapon as well as being a pretty powerful magic item.  Probably my favorite item from any game in any edition.
I really like the Sunblade from the 1e Unearthed Arcana. It was a bastard sword, but handled like a short sword. It also had a few other cool magical effects.
Sometimes the coolest items are those that a DM or player make up. They are remembered through time more than any other object:

A box of endless crickets in a Ravenloft campaign. When opened a myriad of crickets spawned from inside the box and filled dungeon rooms very quickly. The DM had to take it away from us because of the abuse of usages we came up with.

Bowl and spoon of endless flan in a Dark Sun campaign. Later the DM allowed only 1 flan a day.

Crystal fullplate in Dark Sun. A completely transparent set of armor made of magical crystal that a dwarf wore naked beneath. Disgusting but hilarious.

The Rod of the God of Oranges and Tangerines. If placed on earth it grew instantly to a tree full with oranges and tangerines. (It was at first a generic non-existant god name from Ravenloft that our DM invented upon the question: To which God do they pray in this village? Later with the finding of this item we discovered that he really existed)

A pirates plush parrot. This pirate had the plush parrot attached to his shirts shoulder. The pirate talked for the parrot and had conversations. It never showed any signs of magic but at the end when the pirate died and drowned into the sea it looked into our eyes and cursed us.

In my current D&DN playtest, I'm running a home-converted Red Hand of Doom. The dwarf fighter happened to roll a bit more lukewarm for ability scores when compared to the rest of the PCs. So I replaced the sword found in Amery Vraath's skeletal hand with this (sort of a cross between the hammer of thunderbots ad a dwarven thrower):


Grubthar’s Hammer
This ancient warhammer was crafted by the fabled Dwarven Forge–Master, Grubthar Ironfist, to help aid in quelling the giantkind threat during the Fellstone Wars of more than 400 years ago. This ornate weapon weighs a hefty 15 pounds due to the rare, dense metals and alloys used in its creation.

Property:  You gain a +1 bonus to attack and damage rolls made with this weapon. It can be hurled as a thrown weapon, with a range or 20/80 feet, then returns to its owner’s hand.

Property:  The warhammer thrums with a faint vibration whenever it is within 100 feet of a giant, hinting at the weapon’s history, as well as its greater purpose and power.

Requirement:  You must be a dwarf to become attuned to this weapon.

Properties (Attuned):  The bonus to attack and damage rolls increases to +3. In addition, the wielder has access to the following additional properties:

  • Giant Slayer:  This weapon deals 2d6 extra damage to giants. It also scores critical hits against them with a natural d20 roll of 18-20.

  • Thunderburst:  When hurled, a critical hit from this weapon unleashes a loud thunder clap. Any non-dwarf within 20 feet of the target must make a DC 15 Constitution saving throw. On a failed saving throw the creature is deafened for 1d6x10 minutes. Giants failing their saving throw also suffer 3d6 thunder damage. On a successful saving throw they take only half the damage and are not deafened.

  • Vengeful Smite (3 charges/day): Expend 1 charge to reroll any one damage die resulting from a hit with this weapon. Expend 3 charges to change a normal hit from this weapon into a critical. Each time you suffer a critical hit while wielding this weapon, gain 1 charge (charges in excess of 3 are lost after any rest).


Rarity:  Legendary.

History (Lore skill check)

DC 13:
Forged by the legendary mountain dwarf, Grubthar Ironfist, in 1023 CY (over 400 years ago) and used to helped turn the tide against his hated foes, the giants, during the Fellstone Wars. The fabled smithy hailed from the once-proud Hammerfist Holds of the Wyvernwatch Mountains.

DC 16:
Grubthar was said to have died completing it, his finest masterpiece. The forces harnessed in its creation proved too much for even him. Some even say his spirit still resides within the weapon.

DC 19:
The warhammer was gifted from an unnamed dwarf trade ally to Amery Vraath in 1259 CY, in honor of his (short lived) victory over the Twistusk forest giants. But it has since been forgotten to the ages.

DC 22:
For over 200 years the warhammer has been hidden away in a secret vault beneath Vraath Keep, still clutched in the skeletal remains of Amery Vraath, to whom it was gifted.
In an old campaign I gave the players a sword, they thought it was fabulous +2 to hit and damage, bane against creatures that would harm elves. However, the sword would always miss an elf if used to attack an elf. The elven paladin thought it a great joy to fight orcs, goblins, etc... but then he went down to fight drow.... 

He did not think that drow are elves too... imagine his surprise when he constantly missed and then had very bad things happen to him. 


Magic items tend to have a downside in our games. 
Vengeful Smite (3 charges/day): Expend 1 charge to reroll any one damage die resulting from a hit with this weapon. Expend 3 charges to change a normal hit from this weapon into a critical. Each time you suffer a critical hit while wielding this weapon, gain 1 charge (charges in excess of 3 are lost after any rest).

"By Grabthar's hammer, by the sons of Worvan, you shall be avenged."

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I once had a kender throw a Quall's Feather Token on the ground between a Balor's legs...
"By Grabthar's hammer, by the sons of Worvan, you shall be avenged."

Yeppers! My daughter absolutely loves that movie and got a huge kick out of it when I revealed the hammer's name and that particular ability. The dwarf's player not so much. But I didn't care at that point.

I could argue that that was some of Alan Rickman's best work.  I would probably lose... but I could argue it.  Laughing
I could argue that that was some of Alan Rickman's best work.  I would probably lose... but I could argue it. 

I may resist slightly, but only slightly, to such a notion...

Hands down one of my all-time favorite character actors. Makes such a great villain. The best.

But, alas, we have digressed...

It must have been the work of some kind of magical compulsion, because... magic.
As with many others, my favorite item is one with personality, in other words, an intelligent item.

The Dagger of Souls was an evil dagger that grew more powerful every time it killed and absorbed a soul.  It would, however, also corrupt the owner, turning them toward evil.  The temptation, of course, was that, given enough souls, the Dagger could eventually become powerful enough to kill a god.  Many a plot was crafted around that dagger and many a PC corrupted by it. 

All around helpful simian

I once gave the party a bucket - any non-enclosed fluid placed within the bucket would simply vanish.

Initially they used it to empty water from dungeons - or to stop the rather aggressive flow of a jet of water blocking the path along a cliff face.

Then they emptied a river... and a lake - and the huge city that had been located alongside that river had no water. The residents left the city, and it is now a ghost town - in which nothing but bandits and scum live.

After they realised what they had done... They put the bucket away, hid it, never to be used again.

Since... It has turned up in every campaign I have ever run. They love it. 
I once gave the party a bucket - any non-enclosed fluid placed within the bucket would simply vanish.

Initially they used it to empty water from dungeons - or to stop the rather aggressive flow of a jet of water blocking the path along a cliff face.

Then they emptied a river... and a lake - and the huge city that had been located alongside that river had no water. The residents left the city, and it is now a ghost town - in which nothing but bandits and scum live.

After they realised what they had done... They put the bucket away, hid it, never to be used again.

Since... It has turned up in every campaign I have ever run. They love it. 



That is very cool! its going in my book! muhahahahah!
Also, in one game there was a cursed scimiar named Elfsbane. While it did in fact empart extra damage to elves, it also emparted a complete hatred for elves on the wielder. Being a cursed item, it bound itself to the half-orc of the party, who from then on refused to work with the elves in the party. Being that they were Drowm this only added on top of the normal distrust for the dark elves. After trying to kill one in their sleep, they finally realized something was amiss and realized that it was cursed, not just magical. So they hog tied the half orc up and set off to get the curse removed. But even when the curse was broken, and the sword destroyed...the half orc still kept the hilt in his pack...secretly.
My two copper.
I don't remember it's name, but it was a FUllblade I got after our Sci-Fi campaign party went after a group of high-ranking assassins who were based off No More Heroes characters. While I battled the Destroyman expy, one group attacked the #1 assassin and, after killing him, stole his Fullblade, and brought it back as loot. Since I'm the only one in the party that uses melee weapons at all, I got the Fullblade, which I paid some people to add the Frost "tech upgrade" to.

The assassin had basically personally modified the blade to be the ultimate killing/debillitating weapon. It was capable of powerful killing blows or with a slight change in how it's held, it can cause bleeding(Ongoing), head injury(Dazed), tripping(Prone), or moe them around(Slide). On a good swing(crit) it could even be quickly turned back around for a second strike(No Action At-Will Attack, can stack another extra if the No Action attack crits) or hit in the right spot to cause temporary paralysis(Stunned). That and it's Frost abilities powering my Blackguard cold powers, and my violent gung-ho "Kill First, Kill More Later" attitude, it was a match made in bloody heaven.

My crowning moment was when we ended up running into mr #1 rebuilt in a cyborg body to guard the area we're heading through. He now carried dual laser blades, which I spotted and immediatly threatened to desroy him(quick background, a man with dual laser blades murdered another PC[player could no longer make it to sessions] who my PC felt a bond with, since they were both violent killing machines, and vowed a blood oath to take vengeance at his funeral where he was blasted into his people's sun).

First round I had to move and Total Defense(I could have whacked some nearby mooks, but my PC was in too much of a bloody rage at the boss to care about them). Second round, I charged in and smacked him hard with an At-Will which crit, and stunned him. Third round I crit again, crit again, regular hit, action pointed and crit a daily, crit that, then crit the next hit. The result was the boss being smeared into a bloody paste on his own blade within 2 turns of me attacking him. At which point my job was finished and I felt the blade become a powerful signature symbol of mine.
Then swung a line of suns through a galaxy cluster and plunged the universe into war, but that's unrelated.

Hopefully when we finally start this campaign from it's year long hiatus tomorrow the DM will let me keep that sword. I have so many plans for it.
Decanter of Endless Water. One of my first characters found one of these somewhere around 6th level, and I decided he would build himself a castle that featured running water. Consider that he was a barbarian from the Wolf Nomads, and it was rather unusual. He also had a Sunblade, which has been one of my favorite weapons (probably due to one of my favorite cartoons growing up was Thundarr the Barbarian)..

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Decanter of Endless Water. One of my first characters found one of these somewhere around 6th level, and I decided he would build himself a castle that featured running water. Consider that he was a barbarian from the Wolf Nomads, and it was rather unusual. He also had a Sunblade, which has been one of my favorite weapons (probably due to one of my favorite cartoons growing up was Thundarr the Barbarian)..


The Sunsword was awesome, from Ravenloft at least. You swung it around your head and shouted "Behold the light of day!" And it cast an aura of real daylight around you. Cool flavour.
My two copper.
I always did like Sunblades as weapons, but that is because for the most part I despise undead - and a sunblade helps with that a lot.



We threw around a vorpal dagger of healing for a time. Make an attack roll, on anything but a 20, they heal. On the 20... The chances were that they were going to die. 



At one stage (I think I took this from somewhere else) I threw a top hat at them. If they reached into the hat, they could pull out a rabbit. Then, seconds later, an ominous red '10' appeared on the rabbits forehead. Then it started to count down. Suffice to say, all hell broke loose, they threw it and ran like hell. Closing as many doors as they could between themselves and it.

Nothing happened. No explosion, nothing.

It turned out the rabbit had just vanished at '0' 
There are two major D&D memories I have, and they both involve magic items.

When I was playing a paladin (who shares my user name) he came across a powerful weapon called the Hand of Kord. It was a chaotic good/chaotic neutral intellegent weapon that was obsessed with killing undead. Being a Paladin the chaotic part of the alignment always gave me some pause. Well I had fun with it at first until it started to mind control me into fighting a non-hostile lich that was at least 10 levels higher then me. Amazingly I made my saving throws against the domination from the weapon and the death attack from the lich, and then escaped. From that point the weapon was my adversary, I couldn't get rid of it as it had enough of a strength score to propel itself across the floor and jump off the ground back into my hands. I later found a group of mages that opened a rift to the astral plane where I could discard the weapon once and for all.

In anouther campaign (same DM) I was playing a wizard that was cursed. (I had an artifact that was necessary for my physical and mental health stolen). At one point in the lair of the necromancer that had my artifact we discoved a series of strange objects. One was called by the party the polymorph table. You lay something on it and change the dail and it would change, it had 3 main states (alive, dead, and vampiric undead). This in itself wasn't that interesting until we figured out that we could use it for resurrecting people by first transforming the corpse to a vampire, letting them regenerate, and then transform them back to full life. Our party was betrayed by an NPC who happened to be a type of weak immortal. We were able to dismember him and stuff his pieces into a bag of holding, when we needed directions we would pull the head out, cast charm, and ask questions. When we felt sorry for him we put his pieces on the polymorph table to reassesmble him as a mortal. Crazy battle insued when he wanted to stay a powerful vampire instead. By a series of natural 20s my wizard with a strength of 8 strapped him to the polymorph table and 'resurrected' him to a mortal state. Too bad he got his soul sucked out by some horrors on the next level.
Flagon of Ale Procurement
Properties: You know the distance to the nearest alcoholic beverage
Daily-Minor Action
For 5 minutes you know the direction and distance to the nearest source of water within 30 squares (150 feets) and the the direction and distance from the nearest alcoholic bevarage within 60 squares (300 feets). If you are a dwarf you can also know the direction and distance to ingredents for alcoholic beverage within 60 squares (300 feets) 
imovable rods.

even had a wizard in ine campaign fake a flying castle with them, using multiple imovable rods to make a foundation then build a tower on top of them