Destiny

I want to get some ideas for how to handle destinies. Do you let your players decide their own destinies? Have you ever given your players a destiny with out notifying them of it? How did you handle it, how did it work out?

Thats just what I can think to ask at the moment. If you think of more things you think would be useful for me to know, please do share
If I'm using Destiny I will give all of the players a "secret" Destiny that is only known to me.  This lets them aquire and use DP but leave me with control of the other bonuses which I can then use to manipulate things when needed.  I may let players indicate what they believe their actual Destiny should be but the do not get the final say.

One thing I really suggest NOT doing is letting your players pick their own Destiny including how to fulfill it.  I believe it puts too much power in their hands and opens the Destiny system up to abuse.  For example allowing the player to choose an "Education" Destiny which he says is to train someone else in the ways of the Force (get them UtF as a trained skill) is ultimately an extremely easy way to get another +5 (almost always to UtF) skill which can be extremely troublesome.
 
Insightful and helpful as always StevenO.
More questions:
So if you decide yourself, how do you determine what you think their destiny should be?
And how do you decide its specifics?
I'm running my first game, but so far... I've done both.  I've asked who wanted a destiny.  (Amazingly only 2 of 6).  I then talked with them about what they wanted their destiny to be.  One of them those to go with a secret destiny.  One of them picked a very clear cut destruction destiny for a major non-canonical crime lord that came into being because of his backstory.

If you have a "secret" destiny, you don't actually HAVE to decide it's specifics besides type right away.  If the campaign swings a whole new way, you can edit it as you see fit, and the player who don't know better won't be able to know you've changed it.  If they make what you deem significant progress to the current goal, give them the 24 hour bonus.  Even if the destiny changes, they won't know the specific action usually that gained them the bonus.

Now, if you really want to have some fun with players trying to fulfill their secret destiny, especially with a destruction destiny, you can tell them they have a destruction destiny.  Then watch them try to figure out who they're supposed to kill each time you introduce possible enemies, when they're actually supposed to be destroying some object or another..
Zilfallion has my basic reason down for using Secret Destiny:  you can make it up as you go.  As I see it a GM should have some ideas about the path he wants his campaign to follow and some of the major things that should happen along the way.  You can then use those things to shape the Destiny and basically use the 24 rewards and penalties as the carrot and stick to get the PCs going along.
Mickale, I just want wanted to point out that StevenO's method -- choosing a secret destity for each PC, never revealing the character's destiny to the player, and using it only behind the GM's screen to direct the character's course -- while perfectly valid, is only one end of the spectrum of how the Destiny mechanic can be used. 

The other end of the spectrum, which Steven describes -- allowing a player to choose his own Destiny and determine what specifically constitues fulfilling that Destiny -- while something Steven is not comfortable doing, is also perfectly valid and something I've used to great effect.

It really depends on how much input and control over the events of a PC's life you, as GM, want the player to have.  Those GMs, like myself, raised on traditional RPGs and old school, 1st ed. D&D may be less inclined to give a player a lot of control over a PC's destiny.  However, newer, indy RPGs such as Dogs in the Vinyard, Ganakagok, and Shock take a different approach, giving the players a great deal more control over the events and circumstances of their character's lives.  Many fans of such indy games and of a "stakes-based" approach to roleplaying welcome the Destiny mechanic to allow Saga to permit that style of play.

And, of course, anywhere in between those two ends of the spectrum works just fine as well.  I've tried many, many different ways of using Destiny, from the secret Destiny to the let-the-player-chose-what-fulfills-his/her-Destiny, and varying shades in between, and they all worked just fine.
FAN-MADE SAGA ED. ADVENTURES Scores of free, fan-made Star Wars adventures for Saga Ed. ●DATHOMIR FIELD GUIDE A Saga Ed. sourcebook for adventures set on Dathomir ●LIVE ACTION FILM CHARACTERS SOURCEBOOK Saga stats for hundreds of characters from the live action films ●"ALL-PURPOSE" SAGA EDITION SOURCEBOOK Saga stats for NPCs, droids, ships/vehicles, weapons/gear, etc. ●SAGA EDITION SPECIES SOURCEBOOK Official & fan-made Saga stats for your favorite species ●THE CENTRALITY: A SAGA EDITION GUIDE AND GAZETTEER As featured in The Lando Calrissian Adventures ●THE CORPORATE SECTOR SOURCEBOOK As featured in Brian Daley's Han Solo novels and original edition of the Star Wars RPG ●SAGA EDITION CRIB SHEETS Various fan-made Saga Ed. Crib Sheets for players & GMs
Saying I'd "never" actually choose and reveal a PCs Destiny is a little strong.  I'll admit the added power a completed Destiny provides isn't something I usually encourage but if I have a player who is roleplaying well (which includes "playing nice" to everyone including me) and I can see a major goal being achieved in the near future I'm not against choosing and revealing a Destiny as a reward for that good play.  In some ways I see completed Destinies as that extra "XP award" for someone providing everyone with a great game experience.
 
I prefer not to use the Destiny system at all. I like Backgrounds better, although I'll admit that adding class skills could be problematic for larger groups. With smaller PC groups, I don't think it's unbalancing, since the PCs could probably use a little extra help anyway. But I digress.
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Just wanted to say thank you, I will keep all of what has been said in mind. And I believe it will help greatly in the next campaign I will be running.

On an unrelated note, I believe I shoudl be thanking Rob for the next session in my current campaign, wouldnt have anything to do tomorrow if I hadnt stumbled across your pdf of Darth Mauls Tower, The Tower of Zaddaj.
NIIIIIICE!  Well, there are SCORES more where that came from, Mikale.  Try Standoff at Leritor (see my sig) next time you have GM's block.

And do tell us what happens in your run of the game in the Darth Maul's Tower thread.
FAN-MADE SAGA ED. ADVENTURES Scores of free, fan-made Star Wars adventures for Saga Ed. ●DATHOMIR FIELD GUIDE A Saga Ed. sourcebook for adventures set on Dathomir ●LIVE ACTION FILM CHARACTERS SOURCEBOOK Saga stats for hundreds of characters from the live action films ●"ALL-PURPOSE" SAGA EDITION SOURCEBOOK Saga stats for NPCs, droids, ships/vehicles, weapons/gear, etc. ●SAGA EDITION SPECIES SOURCEBOOK Official & fan-made Saga stats for your favorite species ●THE CENTRALITY: A SAGA EDITION GUIDE AND GAZETTEER As featured in The Lando Calrissian Adventures ●THE CORPORATE SECTOR SOURCEBOOK As featured in Brian Daley's Han Solo novels and original edition of the Star Wars RPG ●SAGA EDITION CRIB SHEETS Various fan-made Saga Ed. Crib Sheets for players & GMs
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