12/3/2012 MM: "The Six-Year Plan"

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This thread is for discussion of this week's Making Magic, which goes live Monday morning on magicthegathering.com.

"So how did our three-year return go? Not great."

LOL.

Multicolor is by far the most enjoyable block theme - the complete antithesis of godawful tribal, which leads to a degenerate constructed deck and tunnel-vision drafting, the polar opposite of drafting multi.

Wedges of Alara 2014.

You're welcome.

- Sol 
"Multicolor is by far the most enjoyable block theme - the complete antithesis of godawful tribal, which leads to a degenerate constructed deck and tunnel-vision drafting, the polar opposite of drafting multi."

Sounds like you didn't draft much Lorwyn, then. Because yes, that was a problem with Onslaught block, but Lorwyn was really very flexible in terms of draft strategies. Certainly much more so than Shards of Alara which suffered from the problem that you really had to pick a Shard so there were actually only five viable archetypes (or maybe six if you somehow managed to go five colour before the release of Conflux).

One of the broad trends of the last ten years of Magic is that R&D are slowly getting better at making good Limited environments. Zendikar is about the only bad-for-Limited Expert set there has been since the start of the six year plan and even that wasn't awful.
Time Spiral still the best i sleep with a foil uthden troll under my pillow. Hopefully modern masters is like what time spiral wouldve been with a bunch of powerhouses. It could easily top it for best set.
Bringing booster packs back to expert level
One of the broad trends of the last ten years of Magic is that R&D are slowly getting better at making good Limited environments. Zendikar is about the only bad-for-Limited Expert set there has been since the start of the six year plan and even that wasn't awful.

Avacyn Restored.
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I think the fact that Shards came right after two hybrid sets is what turned some people off. That there were five consecutive multicolor sets, not that it had "only" been three years since the previous multicolored set.
I don't think that was the problem with Shards block. I think the "turdic" mechanic might have had something to do with it.

But in general, though, recent years have been a lot of fun. The power differential between cards pushed for constructed and the rest is painful and annoying, but apart from that, things are good. I do like seeing this kind of article.
So, then we can assume that the next block will be Tribal? And, we won't get an original block theme again for a few years since Innistrad was last year? This article really showed me that R&D will only give us something truly new every 3 or 4 years. Kind of unfortunate. I'm already tired of the Tribal/Multicolor/Artifacts block cycle.
So, then we can assume that the next block will be Tribal? And, we won't get an original block theme again for a few years since Innistrad was last year? This article really showed me that R&D will only give us something truly new every 3 or 4 years. Kind of unfortunate. I'm already tired of the Tribal/Multicolor/Artifacts block cycle.



Not really.  Either last year or the year before last, MaRo defined the change in Magic design ushered in by the 'Seven Year Plan.'  Essentially, they are now designing around theme rather than mechanics.  Because of that, we won't necessarily have a 'tribal block' or a 'multi-color' block in the traditional sense.  Rather, they will examine the theme they are presenting (horror on Innistrad, return of the guilds in RtR), and see what mechanics are appropriate.  In the case of these two, a minor tribal mechanic was used in Innistrad, while a major multi-color mechanic was used in Ravnica.  However, they have stated they are not afraid to change the usage of particular mechanics if it fits the block theme.  That's the whole point of the new plan.

Also, we will likely never see a block again that has NO recurring mechanic.  As was established during Zendikar, they like having at least one returning mechanic in each set.  It is intended to provide something for returning players to feel nostalgic about, as well as save design space for future sets and expand upon underutilized mechanics of the past.

TLDR: You're probably going to see returning mechanics, but that doesn't necessarily mean they're denying space for the new, it just means they fit into the existing block theme.
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Starting during Shards of Alara was a big deal as a player. I thought multicolor was usual ground for MtG. Ever since that block, when I see a set that doesn't utilize multicolor, deep down inside I am a little bit disappointed.

It has more design space than all the other "mechanics" ever, combined. They are the most popular type of imagined card by the players, and many of them are quite interesting-- another token of how richly expansive it is.
I don't think that was the problem with Shards block. I think the "turdic" mechanic might have had something to do with it.


Really? I have the idea that Alara block actually has some killer cards, including commons, for Limited and Constructed.

In fact, the only thing I didn't like was that the fix was so bad that Limited was very swingy. The difference between turn-two Qasali Pridemage, turn-three Woolly Thoctar for the one that got lucky against turn-two Gleam of Resistance-cycling, turn-three Obelisk of Esper while you set up was too much.
Also, we will likely never see a block again that has NO recurring mechanic.


RTR has a very strong chance of doing just that. MaRo has stated he wanted all guilds to get new keywords, and 10 is a LOT of of mechanics for a single block. I would not be surprised if we didn't get a returning mechanic.
Immature College Student (Also a Rules Advisor)
So, then we can assume that the next block will be Tribal? And, we won't get an original block theme again for a few years since Innistrad was last year? This article really showed me that R&D will only give us something truly new every 3 or 4 years. Kind of unfortunate. I'm already tired of the Tribal/Multicolor/Artifacts block cycle.



WotC seems to have shown its disdain for Tribal. One of the problems with Tribal is that you were tunnelled into a race or class, and this was somewhat mitigated back in Onslaught with "paired" helpers for various tribe arrangements, but otherwise still forced you to pick one, and only one. Lorwyn did Tribal so much better, and permitted so much flexible drafting, that you didn't need to "go a tribe" to be effective, and indeed could draft a very flexible deck thanks to the addition of far more tribe-bleed helpers. I've enjoyed Lorwyn and Shadowmoor draft and sealed so much, one of my favorite blocks ever to play Limited in, a close second to the flexibility one had with Ravnica: City of Guilds drafting. Tribal has received less support lately because the natural extension, non-creatures with tribal qualities, that arose from Lorwyn: the tribal subtype. The thing is, to make the mechanic useful, the new cardtype needed to be sustained, even if sparingly, but hasn't been. The reasoning has been:

1. "What should we put the card-type on?" A lack of criteria for what may qualify gaining tribal types and the card type.
2. Their one attempt to "restore" Tribal utility was done ONLY for Eldrazi.

Rather than, say, promoting the card type generally and low-key, like Planeswalkers, only at lower rarities, they instead pushed it on one single tribe bar none. They could have done this differently: Think the flexible utility of Bound in Silence with Rebels. One could, for example, not plug tribal whenever, but put it on cards where it would make sense given OTHER cards that care about creature types. Goblin Lackey can put some things down, but not Goblin Assault! You make the creatures and the tribes narrow, then look at other cards and their flavor and determine THEN if they would be more interesting or flexible to have those types. Innistrad includes a large number of such cards that may have benefited from tribal subtypes, such as how Rooftop Storm could have played this or that card as Zombies, like Army of the Damned; it could have made for ridiculously powerful plays, but also potentially caused the Storm to instead impose a positive mana cost, instead of a null cost.

Tribal is a lost opportunity. Lorwyn taught how flexible tribal could be, and how integrated and yet splashy it could work. WotC points to their internal statistics about how [un]popularly it was received, but fail to note that the cause as Tribal, rather than that it was a far more casual-friendly environment and play experience than, say, Shards. They gave us MANY options, and that was BAD BAD BAD.

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Also, we will likely never see a block again that has NO recurring mechanic.


RTR has a very strong chance of doing just that. MaRo has stated he wanted all guilds to get new keywords, and 10 is a LOT of of mechanics for a single block. I would not be surprised if we didn't get a returning mechanic.



So the question is whether Dragon's Maze will get a new or a returning mechanic. With having to expand upon 10 mechanics, it seems unlikely it will have 2 extra mechanics, but it also seems unlikely it will have no extra mechanics at all because no modern set has ever done that I think.
WotC seems to have shown its disdain for Tribal.



?

The only ones showing disdain for Tribal are the small core of competitive players. Wizards and the player base at large loves Tribal.
I love seeing how little they had everything planned out before it happened
I believe Qilong is talking about the Tribal type.

 

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"So how did our three-year return go? Not great."

LOL.

Multicolor is by far the most enjoyable block theme - the complete antithesis of godawful tribal, which leads to a degenerate constructed deck and tunnel-vision drafting, the polar opposite of drafting multi.

Wedges of Alara 2014.

You're welcome.

- Sol 



Depends. Tribal (and for that matter, infect in Scars) is very linear. Multicolor is anti-linear: It feels modular, but it locks you into more colors; it just happens that designing a multicolor card is somewhat easier. (Though it has its own rules as to what constitutes a gold card! It just happens that what constitutes a gold card includes what constitutes a hybrid card, but you might get an anthem at or at .)

Hybrid, artifacts, and lands are true modularity. And also counters, so long as they aren't poison counters.

On the article itself, in no particular order:

I liked Time Spiral. I know it's Maro's "arthouse" block. Think of it as Rosewater's Ninth if you want. But I still liked it. Actually, a better metaphor might be Evangelion, which is "arthouse" giant robot shonen anime. (Though I think by the end, it's seinen.) It didn't do so well, mostly because Future Sight caused a lot of rules issues, and newer players didn't recognize returning mechanics. Hey, Future Sight must be like episodes 25 and 26! It's weird, and nobody knows what's going on. (Some parts being more grokkable than others, but grandeur's useless in some formats, Muraganda Petroglyphs causes a slew of rules issues, and contraptions.)

Ravnica seems to be how we'll do things from here on in multicolor. (And judging by Innistrad at least, possibly tribal.) Give each faction a mechanical identity.

Zendikar wasn't the first land block, but "sacrifice a land" versus "oh, here's a coin and if you get 100 of them you get an extra life bonus when you play a land". Which one will play better with the players? Plus, you get to summon Cthulhu. How awesome is that? (And for the record, elf tribal.)

Lorwyn shows a nice preview of the Fifth Dynasty. It switches from linear (good, peaceful Lorwyn where the elves still want to annihilate you because you're a tumor on the pristine beauty of the woods) to modular (evil Shadowmoor where the elves are actually nice guys).

Alara. I get what they were going for, but some of the mechanics seemed shoehorned. (White does not have a lot of creatures with power 5 or greater. That's actually the antithesis of white. Black doesn't interact with artifacts that much, outside of artifact-themed sets. Blue and red don't usually recur creatures, except for the occasional phoenix or "this isn't 'really' recursion; it's a clone". Exalted ironically fits black and red more. And devour is a red mechanic with a black/green flavor, used for death triggers; no wonder everyone associates Jund with the five-color cascade instead.) Most importantly, yeah, you can't do all-multicolor and have an interesting limited. Thanks for the promo card, but this didn't just hurt my Teferi EDH deck. And yeah, you have to think of multicolor as something you can't do repeatedly. Take Alara as fair warning, O designers-to-be. Too much of a good thing is a bad thing.

Scars, as mentioned, slowly turns from modular (Mirrodin) to linear (New Phyrexia, though even the Phyrexians have some modular mechanics). Infect spreads across the color pie, almost as cancer or galloping gangrene or something. And it really messes with limited, splitting the colors in two as it does, then at the end, all will be one with Phyrexian mana.
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I believe Qilong is talking about the Tribal type.



Yeah I was wondering about that too because he later talks about that, but looking at his first few sentences:

"WotC seems to have shown its disdain for Tribal. One of the problems with Tribal is that you were tunnelled into a race or class, and this was somewhat mitigated back in Onslaught with "paired" helpers for various tribe arrangements, but otherwise still forced you to pick one, and only one. Lorwyn did Tribal so much better, and permitted so much flexible drafting, that you didn't need to "go a tribe" to be effective, and indeed could draft a very flexible deck thanks to the addition of far more tribe-bleed helpers."

All those instances seem to refer to Tribal the theme, not the type.
Is the podcast working for anybody? I can't listen to them
"So how did our three-year return go? Not great."

LOL.

Multicolor is by far the most enjoyable block theme - the complete antithesis of godawful tribal, which leads to a degenerate constructed deck and tunnel-vision drafting, the polar opposite of drafting multi.

Wedges of Alara 2014.

You're welcome.

- Sol 



That's nothing but a pessimist view. Drafting tribal is among the best because the content all compliments each other. The decks you can make from it always end up being more dynamic and everflowing. Whereas drafting multicolor is basically just mix matching the best whatever content you were able to nab. There may be no synergy between your deck's contents at all. Although, Alara did a much better job than Invasion at making sure color-combo synergy was prominent. They definitely were able to learn from their mistakes. Invasion was crafted for constructed play, and had more flavor, but was hard to draft.

And what you're saying about "tunnel vision" is contradictory to the essence of draft altogether. No matter what type of content you're drafting, you pick a single concept from the beginning and stick to it. All drafting is based on "tunnel vision".

Do you really think they didn't have hard times? You're coming off as though you've got some type of insights about the personal business matters of the company. Well, let's compare your insights to mine then.

Magic scraped by for ages, and suffered huge loses around the era of Invasion block. With the release of Yu-Gi-Oh! and loss of the Pokémon, they faced the crushing weight of two very large competitors. The company took its losses on the game and kept it around because it had sentimental value to the company.

Enter Richard Garfield, who comes back in attempts to boost the game's longevity. He puts out Odyssey, but it's sales and popularity were only mediocre, much to his despair because he did an amazing job with the storyline and flavor. As luck would have it though, sale and popularity skyrocketed with the release of Onslaught. The block was a huge success they rode that wave all the way until Ravinca, when the game took another flatline hit. Ravinca was a flop.

Then they cranked out Coldsnap, looking to bank on nostalgia and finish of the Ice Age block, but it was a flop as well. Now they were getting nervous, a little desperate. Lucky for them, they were able to recover from it with Time Spiral, which was a huge hit. Time Spiral block provided another huge wave for them to ride on all. Then Lorywn was another hit, giving them a double boost. They've been riding that wave ever since.

Next, they anticipated things would slow down again at Alara, and they were right, but they had another ace up their sleve to provide an amazing boost the game overall, the Mythic rare. It added a huge amount of appeal to game in many aspects, and it's made every single Magic product more appealing. Their second booster shot was to revamp the Core sets, because 8th, 9th, and 10th edition were all flops (so factor that in to their hard times as well). And the M series was another huge success, which has brought them to where they are now, with Zendikar, Scars, and Innistrad, all of which have been huge hits.

Just because the game sells worldwide, and they've currently been doing very successful, doesn't mean things have been all rainbows and unicorns. You scoff at what he says as though you know something, but now take my insights into account and do you feel so confident to scoff at him?

Although the truth behind what he says goes farther back than he's accounting, what he is saying still holds an incredible amount of truth. Magic suffered a Great Depression starting at about Mercadia block, and from that time till about Onslaught, it was a Near-Death Experience.

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Podcast isn't playing for me either. It's obviously just a small database issue.

Nothing impressive, nothing to get upset about.

Just give the database team some time and I'm sure they'll have it fixed like brand new.

By the way, I'd like to strongly suggest that they give Rosewater a break from the Making Magic article. It needs to be retired. It's amazing that the guy has been able to keep it up all these years. There is only so much you can say about how to develop Magic as a game and product. I can often summarize the most important aspects into a single five-paragraph article in the design notes and highlights I provide for my custom Magic projects. He's been running circles for years, it's not right.

It would be a great idea to change things up. Leaving anyone to the same thing for too long is bad protocol. For this same reason good managers cycle their co-worker's shifts and positions. It's basic business management protocol to keep your workers fresh. The last thing you want to do is run them through the ringer endlessly.

As for what, retiring Savor the Flavor was about the worst thing they could have done. I really loved Doug's work. He's an amazing writer, and overall a really good person. If it was true for him, why wouldn't it be true for anyone else? Sometimes you've got to step back and take a rest. You need a new beginning.

Thing is, the concept of flavor is the foundation of Magic. It's the foundation of fantasy gaming. That was by far the most important article of them all. It should never be laid to rest for any reason. Given Rosewater's experience, I think it would a great idea to have him to pick up and start writing Savor the Flavor. I strongly recommend this. I'm sure he'd have a lot of fresh ideas, a lot juicy details, and a lot of experiences he could share with everyone.

It would be a fresh start for him, and judging on some of the Making Magic articles (like when he starts talking about Disney vacations, Roseanne, and Monopoly). God have mercy, give the guy a break; a fresh start is exactly what he needs.

I hope this means something coming from me.

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Ravnica was a flop? In whose world, Champion? Because from where I'm sitting it was one of the best-selling and most loved blocks in the world, which is why Return to Ravnica was such a big deal. I'm sorry reality doesn't conform to your all-consuming fanfiction.
Just because it was a big deal in your world doesn't mean anything. It was a flop compared to Onslaught and Mirrodin (which was just riding the wave Onslaught created). Kamigawa was a HUGE success in Asia, but I bet you'd say because of the prices Saviors packs were going for that it was no good. It just goes to shows what you know. Kamigawa was another huge hit, but Ravinca flopped. It wasn't anywhere near as popular as either of the aforementioned sets. That's what business' look at, when there is a spike and sales, then there is a drop. That drop is called a flop. Sales and interest in the game dropped during Ravinca. It's obvious that you're just caught up in your own experience of it that leads to to think it was greater than it actually was.

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That's nothing but a pessimist view. Drafting tribal is among the best because the content all compliments each other. The decks you can make from it always end up being more dynamic and everflowing.



multicolor necessarily has better synergy.  in tribal, you are cobbling together decks.  i like tribal, but it is more difficult to draft.  it is not more dynamic, it is less.  everflowing is a meaningless word here, but even if it werent, it would mean the opposite of what is actually true.

Whereas drafting multicolor is basically just mix matching the best whatever content you were able to nab. There may be no synergy between your deck's contents at all. Although, Alara did a much better job than Invasion at making sure color-combo synergy was prominent. They definitely were able to learn from their mistakes. Invasion was crafted for constructed play, and had more flavor, but was hard to draft.



you dont know what the word synergy means if youre saying that.  cards working together = synergy.  multicolor sets have this moreso, simply because whatever random combination you want to draft is easier to play.

And what you're saying about "tunnel vision" is contradictory to the essence of draft altogether. No matter what type of content you're drafting, you pick a single concept from the beginning and stick to it. All drafting is based on "tunnel vision".



thats simply incorrect.  the tunnel vision he was referring to means it is much more difficult to pick up a new color or make reactive changes because of the monocolor issues.  having a strategy is good, but if you draft correctly, you dont have tunnel vision.  you must make on the fly decisions.

Do you really think they didn't have hard times? You're coming off as though you've got some type of insights about the personal business matters of the company. Well, let's compare your insights to mine then.

Magic scraped by for ages, and suffered huge loses around the era of Invasion block. With the release of Yu-Gi-Oh! and loss of the Pokémon, they faced the crushing weight of two very large competitors. The company took its losses on the game and kept it around because it had sentimental value to the company.

Enter Richard Garfield, who comes back in attempts to boost the game's longevity. He puts out Odyssey, but it's sales and popularity were only mediocre, much to his despair because he did an amazing job with the storyline and flavor. As luck would have it though, sale and popularity skyrocketed with the release of Onslaught. The block was a huge success they rode that wave all the way until Ravinca, when the game took another flatline hit. Ravinca was a flop.



ravnica was not a flop.  it is one of the most popular blocks ever.  the company was having issues unrelated to the design of the block.

Then they cranked out Coldsnap, looking to bank on nostalgia and finish of the Ice Age block, but it was a flop as well. Now they were getting nervous, a little desperate. Lucky for them, they were able to recover from it with Time Spiral, which was a huge hit. Time Spiral block provided another huge wave for them to ride on all. Then Lorywn was another hit, giving them a double boost. They've been riding that wave ever since.



time spiral had a lot of issues, some arguably caused by coldsnap, but others by the block itself.
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Just because the game sells worldwide, and they've currently been doing very successful, doesn't mean things have been all rainbows and unicorns. You scoff at what he says as though you know something, but now take my insights into account and do you feel so confident to scoff at him?



he wasnt scoffing.  read what he actually wrote.  and yes, your insignts are not particularly insightful, so i would be highly surprised if youve ever changed anyones mind on anything.

Although the truth behind what he says goes farther back than he's accounting, what he is saying still holds an incredible amount of truth. Magic suffered a Great Depression starting at about Mercadia block, and from that time till about Onslaught, it was a Near-Death Experience.



ugh.

Just because it was a big deal in your world doesn't mean anything. It was a flop compared to Onslaught and Mirrodin (which was just riding the wave Onslaught created). Kamigawa was a HUGE success in Asia, but I bet you'd say because of the prices Saviors packs were going for that it was no good. It just goes to shows what you know. Kamigawa was another huge hit, but Ravinca flopped. It wasn't anywhere near as popular as either of the aforementioned sets. That's what business' look at, when there is a spike and sales, then there is a drop. That drop is called a flop. Sales and interest in the game dropped during Ravinca. It's obvious that you're just caught up in your own experience of it that leads to to think it was greater than it actually was.



if ravnica was so terrible, why are they returning to it?  because its one of the most popular blocks ever, in spite of sales issues.  its obvious that you dont know what youre talking about and are just interested in arguing with people and trying to score points off of them.  none of your posts are ever on topic.

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nice accent mark

obviously i know what it means.  please stop trolling.  i was simply pointing out the issues with your statements in the interests of rational discourse.  neither of your responses add anything to this discussion.  it is cute how even you are willing to let an issue drop when your own bs becomes too deep for even you to wade back into.

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you dont know what the word synergy means if youre saying that.  cards working together = synergy.  multicolor sets have this moreso, simply because whatever random combination you want to draft is easier to play.



While I agree with most of what you posted (although you are feeding the trolls) this is just incorrect. Jund (in Modern) is the primary example of a deck that lives on raw card power and advantage rather than synergy. The point is that in multicolor sets cards don't have to work together to create a powerful deck.
I'm not Mark Rosewater. I am however, going to play attorney on his part here. For the sake of honesty, he says a lot of things that aren't true. His recommendations more often than anything would lead to mediocre content. Just average stuff. But he's been writing that article for far too long and that's obviously why it has come down to what it is now. I'm sure he doesn't mean to write so many half-truths, many shadowed lies, but he's at the end of the line in terms of something new to say.

I'm no troll. You're just blindly defending someone who's in the wrong, putting you in the wrong with them.

And if you knew what what that term means; if you honored it, you'd conduct yourself a lot different than you do.

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By the way, does the term Noblesse Obligé mean anything to you? Do look into that my dear.



Oh god.  you're spiderman and omone?

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Eden of the East =D
toby, your name is awesome.

and while im familiar with the concept of feeding trolls, the purpose of not feeding trolls is so theyll go away.  GM is not going away, so i feel the need to point out his errors for the benefit of new people.

and while youre definitely right about jund and all that, the heart of synergy is castability.  it doesnt have to necessarily be  a combo; it just has to work together.  multicolored blocks do that better, because they have cards designed to enable cross color decks more easily.  this makes decks that are just full of raw power possible, certainly, but it also enables neat combos that might not otherwise be possible in a tribal block.  im sure i could dig up some interesting goblin/wizard synergies from onslaught, but no one ever played them, because youre pigeonholed to a large extent in those blocks, especially in draft formats.

and GM, everyone has come out and said it already.  it isnt that everyone is attacking you.  its that youre attacking everyone else.  youre mucking up our forums and it is really irritating.

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Feel free to copy this into your sig, adding one to the generation number.

 

Generation=0

Is there a reason you're biting at my heels? If you've got something to say, just come out and say it.

If you can't come out and say it, from whence cometh honor?



i think you've got me wrong.  i admire your enthusiasm.  i haven't enjoyed anything on this forums for years, but you and bun have a spark that i think can save this place.  full steam ahead, friend.

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Join us!  
 

he doesnt need any encouragement.  just check out his twitter account lol...

www.nogoblinsallowed.com

 

A creative hub for art and all things Magical, Dungeony, and Dragony!

 

Feel free to copy this into your sig, adding one to the generation number.

 

Generation=0

nobody follows me on twitter. D:

edit: Does anybody else connect the phrase "x-year plans" with Communist countries? Because I totally do. 
Is there a reason you're biting at my heels? If you've got something to say, just come out and say it.

If you can't come out and say it, from whence cometh honor?



i think you've got me wrong.  i admire your enthusiasm.  i haven't enjoyed anything on this forums for years, but you and bun have a spark that i think can save this place.  full steam ahead, friend.



youtu.be/C7dSJN5LgsE


IMAGE(http://cdn.bulbagarden.net/upload/1/1c/Spr_4p_389.png)

nobody follows me on twitter. D:

edit: Does anybody else connect the phrase "x-year plans" with Communist countries? Because I totally do. 



I only have a few follows too Shadowchu, don't let it get you down man. You're a cool dude in my book.

Maybe, but it's bad to relate Communism in a negative way. It's actually like an O.S. (operating system) for countries with very large populations. Like, Windows FFP (for fat people). Only fat is a metaphor for large populations. It gets really technical from here, and I don't want to bore you to no end, so I'll leave it at that. I'd guess what he meant was in business terms. Since executives often plan their market strategies in plans spanning a period of X amount of time.

IMAGE(http://cdn.bulbagarden.net/upload/1/1c/Spr_4p_389.png)

I have 69 followers so at least i'm sexy.

Type "five year plan" into wikipedia and look at the communist/socialist countries that pop up. The rest of what you're saying, I dunno...