Game board

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Can any DM's here recommend a game board I can use/create that is eraseable?

I want to play with a map that I can draw on and erase. Anybody use anything similar to this?

Thanks!

Concisely: I want a system where players don't have to pick between mechanics and roleplaying. I hope 5E fails asap so a better system can be made asap.

( I can't believe what they did to the forums. The sterile lack or color is rather depressing. )

 

Many thanks.....think my local gaming store sells those.
I'm a fan of virtual tabletops for that. They work great, even for gaming in person (especially if you have a large TV or a projector).
Owner and Proprietor of the House of Trolls. God of ownership and possession.
Since my wife is an art teacher and is super handy with these kind of things, here are some Martha Stewart tips I picked up from her:

I like my Cheesex battle mat a lot but you have to be careful not to use any dry-erase or permanent markers on it.  Use only wet-erase non-permanent ones.  Vis a Vis is a good brand.  Even those tend to stain if you leave them on too long.

A better idea is getting a large piece of Lexan or plexiglass (lexan works a little better in terms of cleaning but is more expensive IIRC) or something similar, putting that on top of your paper maps, and using dry erase markers directly on the lexan.  If you need a blank grid you can either lay your Chessex mat underneath it or get a cheaper one just printed on paper.

If you accidentally draw on your Lexan with permanent marker, don't worry.  Just take a dry erase marker and rub all over the mark you left with the permanent one, let it set a few seconds, then wipe away.  Dry-erase compound will dissolve the permanent marker and unless it's been there a really long time it should wipe off easily.

If you see a cool map online and you want to print it to the correct scale, use Posterazor.  I use this a lot with maps from Dungeon magazine to allow me to print out and piece together 1" scale maps.

Another tip:  in our group I allow everyone to see how much damage they've done to each monster.  To that end, we use little white poker chips and put them next to each monster on the board and write the damage on them with dry erase marker.  That way the chips can move around the board with the monsters.  Alternatively, you can just write the numbers on the board, but sometimes that leads to not knowing which number goes with which monster when they move, so we found using the poker chips works better.

For movable zones, instead of drawing the zone, erasing it, and redrawing it over and over again, we use wire, usually pipe cleaners, bent at 90 degree angles to mark the boundaries.  They're easily movable and even resizable

OD&D, 1E and 2E challenged the player. 3E challenged the character, not the player. Now 4E takes it a step further by challenging a GROUP OF PLAYERS to work together as a TEAM. That's why I love 4E.

"Your ability to summon a horde of celestial superbeings at will is making my ... BMX skills look a bit redundant."

"People treat their lack of imagination as if it's the measure of what's silly. Which is silly." - Noon

"Challenge" is overrated.  "Immersion" is usually just a more pretentious way of saying "having fun playing D&D."

"Falling down is how you grow.  Staying down is how you die.  It's not what happens to you, it's what you do after it happens.”

here are some Martha Stewart tips I picked up from her:
Lexan or plexiglass
Posterazor.
poker chips
pipe cleaners

Stolen. This will all be implemented at my next game!

Here are the PHB essentia, in my opinion:
  • Three Basic Rules (p 11)
  • Power Types and Usage (p 54)
  • Skills (p178-179)
  • Feats (p 192)
  • Rest and Recovery (p 263)
  • All of Chapter 9 [Combat] (p 264-295)
A player needs to read the sections for building his or her character -- race, class, powers, feats, equipment, etc. But those are PC-specific. The above list is for everyone, regardless of the race or class or build or concept they are playing.
I want to play with a map that I can draw on and erase.

I personally recommend Flip-mats over wet-erase mats. I've found Flip-mats easier to transport, clean-up, and obtain pens for.

Another couple of tips for newer players:

Baby wipes.  I know it sounds dumb but those things are extremely useful for washing off mats.  They are pretty cheap and they are gentle enough not to ruin the surface but clean well enough to get most things off (dry-erase / wet-erase that has been on too long).

Rings from soda bottles.  Most soda bottles have rings just under the cap that come in a variety of different colors.  These rings can be used to denote all kinds of things (red rings around bloodied characters, hand a stack of green rings to a character to mark his target, a yellow ring is a different player's mark etc.)  The rings are conveniently about 1inch in diameter so they work with the standard square (they can be fit around the base of a mini or the outside of a token) and they can also hang on minis.  Also, they are basically free.  I keep mine on a large caribeener.

Initiative and modifer flags.  Take a piece of paper and fold it until you have a Two-sided little flag set up for initiative and other table-wide benefits.  When the benefit is out the player has the little flag to hold up during other people's turns.  A good example for this is the "Bless" utility given out by low level clerics.

Jenga Blocks work well for impromptu structures.  They are 1inch by 2inch (or 1 inch by 3inch) and can obviously be used to build things onto.  It makes like very easy.

We used to use pipe-cleaners for burst/blast but found they got bent, were too clustery if the melee got heavy.  We started just using clear cutouts  with numbers on them (If you take the full-page sleeve from a binder with clear sleaves and cut it into pieces in the right way you can get a blast 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 from one sheet.)

If you find you have time to set stuff up putting your encounters in ziplock bags can be really handy.  Put all the minis/tokens/ a couple markers / initiative flags in a little ziplock and when they get to the fight just pop it open and plug it into the scenario.

Another way to go about that, and to store things over the long run, if you want to spend a little bit of money and you have a ton of tokens (like if you own both MV1 and MV2) is to use bead containers.  The smaller sized bead containers works well for up to 8 of the small tokens and they can screw together into little towers (which you can use as set pieces as well if you like).  You can also buy larger token holders for different types or styles of beads.

Hope this helps. 
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I want to play with a map that I can draw on and erase.

I personally recommend Flip-mats over wet-erase mats. I've found Flip-mats easier to transport, clean-up, and obtain pens for.



Yep, flip-mats are definitely easier to use.
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I use a A3 paper (11x17), printed wiht a gray grid (You must have a large printer to do it). I just print several pages,  and draw at will on it. Of course those won´t be erased, but one sheet of paper is too cheap, and you won´t spend to much ink printing a gray grid on it...And with the advantage that you can keep a map in case they got back to the same location, without having to reassembly tiles, or redraw on a flip mat. 
Another thumbs up for flipmats.  Paizo makes a whole bunch of themed flipmats too with everything from dungeons to forest to pirate ships to cities.  Great for when you need a certain setting but you're too lazy to draw a map.

Also, yeah, I wholeheartedly approve of using the soda bottle rings for statuses.  It can get kind of ridiculous when you pile on the statuses one after the other, but that's more a symptom of 4e itself than any method you use to track them.

OD&D, 1E and 2E challenged the player. 3E challenged the character, not the player. Now 4E takes it a step further by challenging a GROUP OF PLAYERS to work together as a TEAM. That's why I love 4E.

"Your ability to summon a horde of celestial superbeings at will is making my ... BMX skills look a bit redundant."

"People treat their lack of imagination as if it's the measure of what's silly. Which is silly." - Noon

"Challenge" is overrated.  "Immersion" is usually just a more pretentious way of saying "having fun playing D&D."

"Falling down is how you grow.  Staying down is how you die.  It's not what happens to you, it's what you do after it happens.”

I wholeheartedly approve of using the soda bottle rings for statuses.  It can get kind of ridiculous when you pile on the statuses one after the other

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