Session Debrief: Meh

Players were confused by the spell system.  It seemed needlessly complex, with some spells beting daily, some being "encounter".  It was unclear how clerics select spells.  Saving throws are poorly explained.  We had to make up something.

Solution: Just call them daily and encounter spells, give spells a worksheet so players can enter the variables and see the result.

The monster stat blocks seem incomplete.  The attack roll for a bugbear's sword indicates that the sword has some damage penalty or does not include attribute bonuses. 

Solution: Attacks should be Roll this against that.  With everything included.  We shouldn't have to remember the strength bonuses.   It should be in the roll.  d20 + Bonus vs. AC, on hit, dX + Bonus.  DONE.

Dividing all measurements by 5 to convert feet to squares is just STUPID.  Fire whoever had the dumb idea of going back to feet.  Much of the world doesn't know what five feet is.  They also agreed with my assessment that measuring time in minutes and hours is just silly.

On the upside they liked backgrounds and specialties.  Skill checks were simple and clear.
I believe monsters dont follow the same rules as players. Either that or there are mistakes.
You're the first complaining with me (and my grp) about feet. Forever alone no more.
Still about monsters we found that balanced if you fight 4-5 times in a row with minor rests.


(spells) We didn't like daily/encounter system, we would prefer some slot being added, maybe scaling with the magic stat (like it was in 3.x bonus slots)  
Players were confused by the spell system.  It seemed needlessly complex, with some spells beting daily, some being "encounter".  It was unclear how clerics select spells.  Saving throws are poorly explained.  We had to make up something.

Solution: Just call them daily and encounter spells, give spells a worksheet so players can enter the variables and see the result.



Clerics prepare spells by praying to their deity at some point throughout the day. Most players prefer doing this once they wake up.

They receive three Level 0 spells and one Level 1 spell at first level. They have all of the Level 0 and Level 1 cleric spells available to them, though they may only prepare four spells. For instance, a Level 1 cleric might prepare Cure Minor Wounds, Lance of Faith, Resistance, and Divine Favor. They can cast all of these spells once, or Cure Minor Wounds three times and Divine Favor once. Either way, they can not cast more than three Level 0 and one Level 1 spell per day, nor can they cast a spell that hasn't been prepared.

Spells are cast as an action. If the above cleric decides to use Lance of Faith, they cast it as though they were making a normal attack. Unlike regular attacks, however, the Cleric must subtract the use of that spell from their prepared spell list. If they prepared Lance of Faith twice, they have one more use of that spell.

Clerics, as well as other classes, can also gain at-will and per-day spells through their sub-class or specialty. A cleric with the Divine Healing specialty gains an additional use of Cure Minor Wounds per day at level 1. The same cleric could worship the Trickster god, allowing them to cast Minor Illusion without using a daily spell. In either case, the per-day spells should be seen as an extra spell the cleric is allowed to cast per day, expendable as are the other spells in their repertoire.

The monster stat blocks seem incomplete.  The attack roll for a bugbear's sword indicates that the sword has some damage penalty or does not include attribute bonuses. 

Solution: Attacks should be Roll this against that.  With everything included.  We shouldn't have to remember the strength bonuses.   It should be in the roll.  d20 + Bonus vs. AC, on hit, dX + Bonus.  DONE.



The current dice roll for attacks is d20 + stength mod + class mod. The save is AC + dexterity mod. Expertise dice can be used to increase either of those numbers. Damage still follows traditional D&D methods.

Dividing all measurements by 5 to convert feet to squares is just STUPID.  Fire whoever had the dumb idea of going back to feet.  Much of the world doesn't know what five feet is.  They also agreed with my assessment that measuring time in minutes and hours is just silly.



Using 5 feet as a static measure of distance is a huge relief. Each sqaure is 5' x 5'. If a character wants to move thirty feet they will end up six squares from where they started. It's much better this way, since I've played many a D&D session where squares would change in size from one location to another.

Further, what better way is there to measure time? Seconds and microseconds? Months and years? In combat, one minute passes for every turn your characters make. Why is this important? On more intricate dungeon crawls, the players (and especially the DM) may need to keep track of time-based puzzle elements or other happenings (e.g. water filling a chamber full of players,) so tracking time is a good thing.
I still think they should move over to yards of distance.  It gets rid of that entire divide by 5 thing, and a human being taking up a 1 yard square is as reasonable as taking up a 5' square.

Plus, Europeans can be told that a yard is about a meter.
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