Scales of War Campaign - foreshadowing of the storyline

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Hello everyone,

this week I'm going to start running the Scales of War campaign for my group and I wonder if there is any headsup advise other DMs who already played it could have for me? I'm insterested in blending all of the content together. Is there something like a generall plot summary and some hints of what should/could be foreshadowed during which point of the campaign?

I already did the the H1-H3 campaign in the past and I found that it would have been really helpful if I would have spend more time into getting a general overview of the upcomming modules so that I could foreshadow the upcomming events more smoothly into the campaign. It often felt like it was all just somehow badly stitched together. I found that the fanmade H1-H3 Orcus Conversion tried to catch up with this issue; but I was not able to make much use of it as we already had made much progress when I finally stumbled upon it.

I fear of stepping into the same problems with SOW as the first part is about Rivenroar and reconstitution of the Red Hand, but already in the second part (Bordrins Watch) there is a call to arms and the environment/location totally changes.
Generally speaking, the modules do all tie in together, although there are some cases where you don't see the payoff for quite a while. I would strongly recommend taking some time to read the wiki at this site

scales-of-war.pbworks.com/w/page/6411252...

They do a good job of summerizing each module, with some notes on foreshadowing for the future. For example, I made sure in my run of Rescue at Rivenroar, during the fight at the Antler and Thistle, to call out an NPC as being particularly helpful...getting other patrons out etc...and made that NPC the messenger in Den of the Destroyer.
My advice is not to let the modules themselves dictate your foreshadowing. For one thing, you can foreshadow like a champ, and the players still might not even notice the payoff when it occurs. For another thing, this can lead to the DM ignoring and shutting down interesting choices and consequences, in order to keep the game more or less on the track of the adventures. That is not the intent of any continuity the modules might have. Don't favor continuity over creativity.

You have a general story arc, but I suggest you do what TV shows do: throw out a lot of ideas early, see what sticks, build on that, and call what happened before "foreshadowing." Some of the things you build on might not even pan out - drop those. The things that do pan out then wind up looking like epic plots. Star Trek and Buffy did this; Trek had some neck parasite villains, and some parallel dimension creeps that didn't work out and were dropped, but the Borg caught on and were greatly expanded upon. Spike was intended to a very short-term villain on Buffy, but he "stuck," and was developed into a major character.

Of course, those are the success stories. Lost and BSG worked this way too, and turned into total trainwrecks by the end. I think it's because they couldn't figure out what was really sticking and what was just sticky. They couldn't drop anything. Be okay with dropping things, at least for a while. They may make a comeback later.

So, throw out a lot of ideas. If any stick, work them into the later modules as much as you can, but don't favor the modules themselves over these other ideas, which you know have traction. If any don't stick, drop them.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

Hello everyone,

this week I'm going to start running the Scales of War campaign for my group and I wonder if there is any headsup advise other DMs who already played it could have for me? I'm insterested in blending all of the content together. Is there something like a generall plot summary and some hints of what should/could be foreshadowed during which point of the campaign?

I already did the the H1-H3 campaign in the past and I found that it would have been really helpful if I would have spend more time into getting a general overview of the upcomming modules so that I could foreshadow the upcomming events more smoothly into the campaign. It often felt like it was all just somehow badly stitched together. I found that the fanmade H1-H3 Orcus Conversion tried to catch up with this issue; but I was not able to make much use of it as we already had made much progress when I finally stumbled upon it.

I fear of stepping into the same problems with SOW as the first part is about Rivenroar and reconstitution of the Red Hand, but already in the second part (Bordrins Watch) there is a call to arms and the environment/location totally changes.


JRedGiant had some good input.  I suggest reading all the modules in advance first, then re-reading each one before you run it.  I'm running the Age of Worms Adventure Path right now, and that's what I did.  Having read all of them beforehand made me see which elements were important to foreshadowing.  Then, when I would review each module beforehand, I would recall more clearly which elements were important to the overall plot.  Some things that seem important at the beginning have no effect later. For example, Balabar Smenk in Diamond Lake seems very important at the time, but he has no impact in later parts of the adventure at all.  SO, even though it's not in the modules, I allowed the players to not only disgrace him with the evidence found in the the second module, but use that information to get him indicted of crimes against the Free City, and have all of his holding forfeited.  It rewarded the players with having a concrete effect on their environment, and kept them engaged in the game world.

With SoW, same thing applies.  There's more of them to read than the 3.5 Adventure Paths, but the same principles are still present.  Rescue at Rivenroar, for example, the most important element that comes up later is[sblock]the platinum sword.
 JRedGiant's example of the NPC who becomes the meesenger is a good one, but largely flavor.  But that kind of flavor helps engage your players into the world.


With SoW, same thing applies.  There's more of them to read than the 3.5 Adventure Paths, but the same principles are still present.  Rescue at Rivenroar, for example, the most important element that comes up later is[sblock]the platinum sword.

 



I completely agree with this. What I did in my campaign was...

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...the sword became a magic sword that was "drawn" to Sarl, the party's dragonborn paladin of Bahamut. He carried it for several levels, until being called back to Brindol by the messenger, as the town historian had completed some research on the sword and conducted another ritual to allow Amyria to talk to the heroes, as noted in Den of the Destroyer.

Of course, if you aren't lucky enough to have a player who elects to use a sword and follow Bahamut, this may not work for you.


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