what is the proper way

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How do you kick someone out that you don't want to play?
 
The person that we don't want to play wants to take over as the DM with no clue about what needs to be done and he wants to kick out 2 players because they are women what to do?
How do you kick someone out that you don't want to play?
 
The person that we don't want to play wants to take over as the DM with no clue about what needs to be done and he wants to kick out 2 players because they are women what to do?

Be as mature about it as you can. Try to be upfront about it, and truthful. Treat this person as you'd like to be treated if the situation were somehow reversed.

DO NOT try to handle it through the game itself. Don't be subtle. Don't let prejudice against your friends go unanswered.

Good luck.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

How do you kick someone out that you don't want to play?
 
The person that we don't want to play wants to take over as the DM with no clue about what needs to be done and he wants to kick out 2 players because they are women what to do?



You probably can't legally do what I would like to do in this situation. What I would do in this situation if I were you, was firmly tell him he's not coming back, and you're not going to hear any argument on the subject. Let him know in no uncertain terms that his time with your group is over. If this player was in my group, my response wouldn't be any nicer than "F*** off, you mysogynistic little s***.

When in doubt, see the advice post above mine.
I second all of Centauri's advice.

Make it perfectly clear that the player is NOT welcome in the group and exactly WHY they are not welcome. Make it clear that they won't be allowed back until they've changed.

But don't shout or the like. Remain calm and make it clear that the decision to kick this player out was reached after careful consideration and discussion with the rest of the group. Make it clear that you're making a decision for the betterment of the entire group, NOT out of anger.

EDIT: I mean not out of anger at them as a person. Letting them know you hate their attitude and won't accept it is fine. Just be sure they know you hate what they DO, not that you have a vendetta against them.

Believe me, I've seen quite a few bad egg players who will assume they're being kicked out due to unrational hatred, rather than because the player in question is a ****.
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thanks for your advice everyone
Where are you playing?  Someone's house / gaming store / online / other?

As that can effect things a little.

Be up front, calm and honest.  Point out that the group games for fun and you (and the group) think the problem-person leaves, for the good of the others.
The best way is the Spartan way!


...but Centauri's advice is good too.
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Don't do it at, during, before, or after a session. Do it in person on a day that isn't the normal DND day. Don't do it at anyone's house. Do it somewhere public. Meet up at a starbucks or a gameshop. If things go poorly, you can always leave. Be clear, and polite about why they aren't invited back and make it clear there is no room for debate. "We have decided we don't want you to come to any more sessions. Our playstyles are too different, and it just isn't/won't work out." 

For the sexism BS, if its worth it to you to make a point you can include a bit about how "We don't tolerate sexism in any form, and to kick players because of their gender is way over the line. There is no coming back from that." If its not worth it to you (because you won't ever see them again, and you know it will cause a bigger scene than you are comfortable with) don't. 

If you do it during/before the session, your session for that day will be ruined and quite possibly won't happen. If you do it after a session, the session will be lame (because everyone knows it doesn't "matter" anyway) and awkward as everyone tries not to give it away early. Plus you end up with some "special" people who take this poorly, rant, rave, refuse to leave until they get your way.

"In a way, you are worse than Krusk"                               " As usual, Krusk comments with assuredness, but lacks the clarity and awareness of what he's talking about"

"Can't say enough how much I agree with Krusk"        "Wow, thank you very much"

"Your advice is the worst"                                                  "I'd recommend no one listed to Krusk's opinions about what games to play"

Since our games are always at my place, I just say "Dude, get out of my house." There's an advantage to being the host. I don't have to tolerate people like that. 
Boraxe wrote: "Knowledge of the rules and creativity are great attributes for a DM, but knowing when to cut loose and when to hold back, when to follow the rules and when to discard them, in order to enhance the enjoyment of the game is the most important DM skill of all." Keeper of the Sacred Kitty Bowl of the House of Trolls. Resident Kitteh-napper.
Yeah, at some non-game-day, just send him a message telling him that he's a chauvanistic clueless (swear word of your choice) and that you never want to see him again.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
Politely tell them that they are not allowed to DM because they have a bias against the other players, and thus must remain an adventurer in the group.
Then shoot an arrow into their knee, thus they can't be an adventurer anymore. 
Politely show them the door as you explain that your gaming sessions will not be about Guarding The Town, and thus their services are not needed anymore.   
 

Always right, 102% of the time.
I've asked two people to leave the gaming group in the last year. In both cases I had the support of the other players. I wrote both of them (they both lived several hours away) and in one case I simply told the person if we decided to play a different game, he would be welcome to participate (most of his issues had to do both with the game we were playing and my GMing style) and the other person, a longtime player, I asked her to bow out. Three days later she wrote me back and told me off.

Now, here is the big trick to all of this: In both cases I didn't care personaly if I ever saw these people again. And to date I haven't. If this was a close friend, I'd likely have handled it differently, but these were friends of friends who were being combative and disruptive, and in both cases I told them the whole point of the game is to get together and have fun. If you aren't having fun, why are you playing?
Thanks to those who have seconded my advice. I second krusk's advice. The Amazing Screw-On Head has never steered me wrong.

If I have to ask the GM for it, then I don't want it.

Krusk and Centauri have nailed it. I would only add this...

Talk to the rest of your group, or at least some of them, if you haven't already. Make sure that what you're perceiving is in line with what they're perceiving, and see if you're not the only one uncomfortable about this person.

But I suspect you've already done this, so this is probably a moot point.
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