Book of Vile Darkness movie

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According to my Cable, it is showing at 9PM on Sci-Fi tonight (I'm West Coast). I really liked the trailer so I'm looking forward to it.
;(. I'll wait for my first watching (my tv is better than my comp) but I know what I'm doing tomorrow night.  
I stopped watching at the shopping scene. Hero buying armor:

"Heroic or Paragon?"

Insulted look on his face. "Paragon." Yeah, of course.

D&D Movies don't work when you're trying to make a movie about the rules. Just make a fanasy movie, and leave the rules out of it.

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Of the two approaches to hobby games today, one is best defined as the realism-simulation school and the other as the game school. AD&D is assuredly an adherent of the latter school. It does not stress any realism (in the author's opinon an absurd effort at best considering the topic!). It does little to attempt to simulate anything either. (AD&D) is first and foremost a game for the fun and enjoyment of those who seek the use of imagination and creativity.... In all cases, however, the reader should understand that AD&D is designed to be an amusing and diverting pastime, something which an fill a few hours or consume endless days, as the participants desire, but in no case something to be taken too seriously. For fun, excitement and captivating fantasy, AD&D is unsurpassed.As a realistic simulation of things from the realm of make-believe or even as a reflection of midieval or ancient warfare or culture or society, it can be deemed only a dismal failure. Readers who seek the later must search elsewhere. - Gary Gygax. 1e DMG.
I stopped watching at the shopping scene. Hero buying armor:

"Heroic or Paragon?"

Insulted look on his face. "Paragon." Yeah, of course

Wow, the trailer with it's cheap special effects already looked like they turned every simple stab with a dagger into a 4e power, but this? 

So its one of those things you watch with your gaming group and do shots to because of how bad it is then? Cool.
As a whole, it wasn't nearly as bad as I thought it would be. Webster, it did get better after the shopping scene. However the ending feels like there is about 15-20 minutes of missing footage somewhere, unfortunately that missing footage contained the rest of the story. Pity.
I stopped watching at the shopping scene. Hero buying armor:

"Heroic or Paragon?"

Insulted look on his face. "Paragon." Yeah, of course.

D&D Movies don't work when you're trying to make a movie about the rules. Just make a fanasy movie, and leave the rules out of it.


I was fine with “Heroic or Paragon”. How is this assessment different from asking, “Is it for a Small Business or Midsize Business?”, or “this income bracket or that income bracket?” There are salient levels of power, whether economic or magical, and the world can sense and note them.

In any case, the tension between rules and plausibility, shows how important it is to make the rules sound as natural and plausible as possible.
I enjoyed the movie a lot, D&D: Book of Vile Darkness. A great treat for the holidays. The acting was natural.

The special effects and relatively non-stilted dialogue is testimony to how well the actual 4e rules can work for good story narratives.



The movie plot of Vile Darkness was a bit “darker and edgier” than my personal preference. But this movie is noticeably better than previous movies, and a glimmer of hope that D&D movies are increasing in quality.
I enjoyed the movie a lot, D&D: Book of Vile Darkness. A great treat for the holidays. The acting was natural.

The special effects and relatively non-stilted dialogue is testimony to how well the actual 4e rules can work for good story narratives.



The movie plot of Vile Darkness was a bit “darker and edgier” than my personal preference. But this movie is noticeably better than previous movies, and a glimmer of hope that D&D movies are increasing in quality.

Curious to know if like me, you felt the ending was a bit rushed and imcomplete?
the shopping scene was the only good part, at least that i saw-we turned it off about 30 mins in. the shadar-kai were freaking ridiculous
I felt the ending could have been better but I enjoyed it overall and plan to rewatch (as I liked it and want the dvd, obviously it is doomed to fail financially along with other such gems as Ultraviolet (Milla Jovavich, not the Brit tv show), Bloodrayne, Dungeon Seige:In the Name of the King and Vampire Assassin).
I must say there's some good hits and bad misses. The story wasn't bad but there was some things i feel were unimpressive or disappointing, like the fake chainshirt instead of real chainmail and the Goliath painted skin. Some special effects were nice and some others a little wonky. While cool, the red dragon was not what a D&D dragon look like at all, with 6 eyes and only 2 legs rather than 4.  

I laughted when the merchant at the Adventurer's Vault ask the charater if he want to buy the heroic or paragon vicious weapon, bag of holding and knight armor :P

I wonder what role the D&D Community member who won the contest to feature in it has in the movie though.

[sblock]

Yan
Montréal, Canada
@Plaguescarred on twitter

I was pleasantly surprised by the movie as a whole. Considering I never saw the trailor (but followed the thread by those that did), all I had heard of the movie was that it would be worse than the other two. For those that turned if off after the first 1/2 hour or so, you probably missed the better parts of the movie--although I understand your decision to not go further. Overall, my impression is that it is somewhere near the 2nd movie--though I'm not sure if it was better or worse. I still enjoyed it more than the first movie.
I enjoyed the movie a lot, D&D: Book of Vile Darkness. A great treat for the holidays. The acting was natural.

The special effects and relatively non-stilted dialogue is testimony to how well the actual 4e rules can work for good story narratives.



The movie plot of Vile Darkness was a bit “darker and edgier” than my personal preference. But this movie is noticeably better than previous movies, and a glimmer of hope that D&D movies are increasing in quality.

Curious to know if like me, you felt the ending was a bit rushed and imcomplete?


I felt the same way.
I liked the movie better than any D&D movie so far.  I took the shopping scene for what it was: Cheeky game reference.  By making such an obvious reference to the rules, it's sort of a fun poke at players buying magic items at magic item stores in game.  Anyone ever think about how contrived that actually is in the context of the game world?  Plus, the store was called "The Adventurer's Vault" which made me giggle.
The plotline was kind of darker than I thought.  I expected a troupe of heroes trying to destroy the BoVD.  But the 4e BoVD was supposed to tie into the movie, and the book is mostly stuff for running an evil game (contrary to it's 3e counterpart, which I've always seen as a DM-only book for making truly dark and horrifyingly evil NPCs and giving mechanics to things like torture and sacrfice).  So having a group of non-heroes (with a central "antihero" progressively becoming darker) be the center of the story was internally consistent.
I did feel let down by the end, though.  My comment to my wife (who fell asleep b/c she was exhausted) was "It was pretty good.  Kind of campy, but that's to be expected.  Better than the other D&D movies.  Except the end.  It was doing so well, and the last 5 minutes or so just sucked."
I kept trying to figure out who was what.  I like doling that.  The human Assassin was obvious (didn't see any shadow powers, so I'm guessing executioner assassin), as was the human Swarm Druid with the Vermin Lord Paragon Path.  The goliath I took for a barbarian.  The shadar-kai witch I was unsure of.  I've been under the impression that most shadar-kai witches were warlocks or wizards, but she had healing powers, so...I'm thinking she was a bard.
When watching the first scene, I thought we were seeing the making of a level 1 paladin.  Then he started to get kind of blackguard-y in attitude, but nothing about his abilities suggested anything other than fighter.  Or perhaps still a paladin, just didn't use any flashy powers.  He was wearing plate.
I would have liked to see a few more D&D creatures, though.  Being 4e, I would have liked at least one dragonborn NPC, even if he only had a few minutes of screen time.  The way they did the mind flayer was...interesting, but I was kinda hoping for the tentacled monstrosity.
....wait, it actually came out?

Oh wow.

....where can I watch it? 

Gold is for the mistress, silver for the maid

Copper for the craftsman, cunning at his trade.

"Good!" said the Baron, sitting in his hall,

"But Iron -- Cold Iron -- is master of them all." -Kipling

 

Miss d20 Modern? Take a look at Dias Ex Machina Game's UltraModern 4e!

 

57019168 wrote:
I am a hero, not a chump.
Hello everyone. I also watched "The Book of Vile Darkness" on Saturday night, unfortunately I did not see the ending. I thought the movie was very entertaining and I thought that it was far better than any of the previous movies. I watched it with the thought that it was just a movie and not something to be compared to the rules of the game. I also thought that the "heros" were dark for a "heroic" movie but I also understand that it was for entertainment purposes. I have played D&D using all editions of the game rules and I began playing with the red box basic rules as far as my knowledge of the game is concerned. I would still like to see the end of the movie....
I can't wait for this movie to appear on Tgwtg,Spoony Experiment  or dare I hope Sf Debris.
....where can I watch it? 


You're new to the internet, aren't you?
I watched part of it this weekend while my partner was out drinking or somesuch. I thought the basic plotline of "Paladin joins eeevil adventuring party to save the world" was the best premise ever! Unfortunately, my partner made it home before I had watched the end, and was not impressed with me suggesting that we should watch a Dungeons and Dragons movie. If you live in the UK and have a Virgin Media TV subscription, you can rent the movie through their Movies on Demand service.


 
Mad Scientist
Syfy seems to be rerunning it and Wrath of the Dragon God a lot this week so you might be able to catch it, check your local listings?
I saw it last night and thought it was easily the best of the D&D movies.  Actually, one of the best of SyFy's original movies.  (Of course, neither of those milestones are particularly high praise.)

Still, my wife and I enjoyed it a lot.  I particularly liked the vermin lord, and the idea of a would-be paladin going undercover in an evil party was just delightfully dark.

My biggest complaint is that the sound quality was terrible.  I couldn't understand a word the main villain was saying, and the fight with the dragon sounded like it was being broadcast on AM radio by a truck passing through the mountains.

And I loved all the little references to 4e. The magic shop called the Adventurers' Vault, the reference to the Pyramid of Shadows, the god Pelor. It was just fun to catch the Easter Eggs.

Still, I had some story issues...
Spoiler Alert!

First, why did Grayson kill the goliath?  Of his four companions, the goliath seemed to be the least objectionable. He didn't go out of his way to harm innocents, he seemed to admire Grayson's bravery. Heck, I thought it more likely that Grayson would turn the goliath to goodness than he would turn the shadar kai Akordia.

Second, yes, the ending was literally deus ex machina (in that the "machina" was a holy symbol). That said, I didn't actually want to spend ten minutes of the movie watching Grayson, Ranfin, and Akordia kill a bunch of minions. So I was willing to accept that.  We'll just assume he did a radiant blast attack that eliminated all the minions, and the main villain was simply ridiculously vulnerable to radiant damage.  That's the problem when you min-max. He got all these bonuses by piling on the vulnerability to radiant damage, thinking that nobody has invoked radiant damage in like eight centuries, and then the first new paladin of Pelor shows up on your doorstep.

Third, what the heck was the Vermin Lord's raccoon story supposed to mean? So Grayson was the raccoon? What was he holding onto so desperately?  I don't get it.

Fourth, why couldn't Grayson and Akordia be together in the end?  Do they really anticipate a sequel to this TV movie?  (Okay, I have one in my head, but really, they should just make more movies that tie into future supplements.)
 
I'll leave you with my favorite pun of the evening. So in the beginning of the movie, they mention that the paladins destoyed this special ink and my wife asked what ink was used to pen the Book of Vile Darkness?

 I said, the Vial of Booky Darkness.
Well played, sir.


Well played, indeed.


Skeptical_Clown wrote:
More sex and gender equality and racial equality shouldn't even be an argument--it should simply be an assumption for any RPG that wants to stay relevant in the 21st century.
104340961 wrote:
Pine trees didn't unanimously decide one day that leaves were gauche.
http://community.wizards.com/doctorbadwolf/blog/2012/01/10/how_we_can_help_make_dndnext_awesome
Overall, for a D&D movie, it wasn't bad.  Certainly better than the first one (still griping about dragons as fighter planes... but I digress).  

I kind of liked the setup for the blackguard... that was at least a character backstory I'd believe. Some of the rest of his "dark & troubled path", like trying to free the village's children while the rest of the party slaughtered their parents, was a bit of a stretch, but they hit the initial feel pretty perfectly.

I thought the look of the goliath & the vermin lord were pretty spot-on.  The Shadar-Kai witch/assassin was a bit of a Mary Sue, but maybe they had to make up with powers for her less-than-awesome acting.  The rest of the plot was passable, though the end certainly did feel very rushed. 

I was glad to finally get to see this.  I know it went straight to DVD in Britain, but never made a release here in the US.   While it won't win any oscars, it was worth at least one viewing, and did give me one or two minor ideas for my own game.
From what you are all saying, i suppose they kept the...more gray morality thing from 4e and PoL...where pure good and pure evil doesn't really exist and alignment are not real.
From what you are all saying, i suppose they kept the...more gray morality thing from 4e and PoL...where pure good and pure evil doesn't really exist and alignment are not real.


I have no idea what you're talking about. You should probably just see the movie and decide for yourself whether the movie supports or counters your preconceptions about 4e.
....where can I watch it? 


You're new to the internet, aren't you?

And you're new to internet etiquette I take it?

Sorry to rant a little here, but this sort of thing really grinds my gears. Why would you take the time to respond with some snide jibe at someone's internet literacy (i.e. the amount of time one has dedicated to sitting on their ass in front of a screen, i.e. nothing to get conceited about), yet, specifically NOT take the time to actually answer their query after attaining whatever infinitesimal ego boost such annonymous condescension ostensibly grants you? 

Ogiwan, if you want to find it, I suggest buying it. However, it is likely available if you check out google videos or some similar sites as well. You can message me if you need help.