Forest concept art.

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Hello everyone,

I am an aspiring concept artist/illustrator from Montreal and a long time M:TG player.
This is my interpretation of the Forest from the Magic Universe.

Tell me what you think.


Not bad. I think you may want to heighten the contrast just a bit, as at card size the soft, desaturated color changes you've got there might not pop quite as much as they should, if that makes sense.

What plane is this for? Or is it just meant to be just sort of a genericky fantasy forest? 
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Mirrodin?

I like it too, reminds me of how lands used to look. Not an art expert like Keeper though.

139359831 wrote:
That is a lovely painting of Richard Garfield. It really brings out his feminine side.
Nah, it doesn't have the metallic bark and dense foliage of the Tanglewood. If anything it looks more like Wirewood on Otaria.
Coming Soon to the Magic: Expanded Multiverse: FRAGMENTS: A Shards of Alara Anthology
(Click through to view the cover and announcement page)Want to get your work in the Expanded Multiverse? Come join the project! Oh, and check out my blog, Storming the Ivory Tower: making sense of academia, media, and culture twice weekly.
Nah, it doesn't have the metallic bark and dense foliage of the Tanglewood. If anything it looks more like Wirewood on Otaria.


Well, yeah. I know nothing about Otaria - but I was merely commenting on the set symbol.

139359831 wrote:
That is a lovely painting of Richard Garfield. It really brings out his feminine side.
Nah, it doesn't have the metallic bark and dense foliage of the Tanglewood. If anything it looks more like Wirewood on Otaria.



I tend to disagree. I think it has more of a Skyshroud or Llanowar feel to it, but that might just be me purposefully rejecting anything from Otaria.

Anyways, I happen to like the soft desaturated tones you're working with, though spatially, you've kind of dropped the ball. The sun is an interesting inclusion, but the way the piece feels, it seems like you're looking further INTO the forest rather than out of it, which is where you run into your problems by including objects further out. Essentially, as it is now, the forest appears to be getting thicker the further out you go, and that just doesn't jive with the set dressings you're introducing in those outer layers.

The details other than that are good, and I do like the colors you are working with. Unfortunately, I think Keeper might be right, at card size, it might not read as well. I still like it though.
Skyshroud is too dense again. Llanowar, though, sounds plausible, and the trees are probably more suited to that forest. (You're right, actually--the trees are wrong for Wirewood.)
Coming Soon to the Magic: Expanded Multiverse: FRAGMENTS: A Shards of Alara Anthology
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Thank you for the feedback everyone.

I agree with most of the criticism. The ratio is off because the image started as a color exercise. Durign the process I felt it reminded me of the Forests from Mt:G ( Lannowar is probably the closest related plane) so I just continued along that line.

Have any more work like this? I know things seem a bit dead around here but I'm sure people would be interested in seeing what you do.

Also, what medium are you working in? 
Coming Soon to the Magic: Expanded Multiverse: FRAGMENTS: A Shards of Alara Anthology
(Click through to view the cover and announcement page)Want to get your work in the Expanded Multiverse? Come join the project! Oh, and check out my blog, Storming the Ivory Tower: making sense of academia, media, and culture twice weekly.
It looks excellent! I wish I could give helpful advice, but I just wish my artwork was anywhere near that good
Most of my pieces ( like this one) are done in Pohotoshop. However I also do a fair amount of drawing with traditional mediums.

Glad to see this community is alvie and well, i'm always looking for feedback on my work. This is my Sketchbook on CA.org.
Thanks Pile_of_Slag,

I've been using Photoshop for 6 years now (altough for different purposes), 1,5 years for illustration/concept art work. I've posted the forest piece because it was the only one that I created with the M:TG universe specifically in mind. I guess a lot of my other work could fit into M:TG as well, since Magic has obviously been a huge influence on me ( and one of the reasons I wanted to become an illustrator/cocnept artist in the first place). One day I hope to make some pieces for M:TG, that would be a childhood dream come true.

I have heard of Blender and have done some 3ds Max in the past. Rigth now i'm concentrating on getting my 2d painting right, altough i definitely plan to go back and explore the realms of 3d in a near future.
It depends. If you have a super-complicated 3d-shape that you want to illustrate i would say a basic 3d model from Blender,Sketch-up or 3dsMax would be helpful to establish the basic composition. Otherwise no, not really.

Photoshop is still the most widely used tool for 2d-illustration, 3d programs are usually there just to help out with the block-in of the painting. ( Altough things might be different in a few years)
I don't feel comfortable giving advice on things that I haven't experimented with but from waht i've seen I would advise against it because it is very hard to get a realistic lighting ''feel'' from a 3d-program.

In real life lighting on an object is a combination of several different light ''sources'' ( direct light, reflected light, caustics, ambient lighting). You will have to spend a lot of time in 3d to imitate all of them correctly. I would suggest to read a few books on light theory and make studies from life/photos/master paintings. After you have done that and feel comfortable with the subject you can jump into 3d and use it as a tool to enhance your stuff.

I'm saying this becasue i don't really know any 2d artists that have successfully started with 3d to make finished pieces look convincing without having studied extensively in 2d before.
From what I see, I would say that you need to study light/perspecrive/anatomy a lot more before jumping into 3d. There are a lot of things in this piece that you can fix in 2d without even touching 3d.

On the upside, I do like the story/composition and the facial expression of that creature. Some details like her right hand and the vase next to the guy also show signs of refinement.

Here is a quick paint-over for you. Divided into 3 jpgs: clean paintover, composition/anatomy, lighting.


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