Creature Power clarification - Flashing Blades

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Playing a friend, myself as the SoL preset warband, a question arose as to the mechanics behind the Drow Blademaster's Creature Power, Flashing Blades.
On my turn, during the Blademaster's activation, I use his melee attack.  I target an adjacent enemy, the damage is allowed and Flashing Blades is triggered:  "this creature cand deal 10 damage to 1 adjacent creature."
Questions:  1)  Does there have to be a second adjacent enemy for the trigger to occur?  2)  Can the target of the 10 damage be the same target of the initial melee attack?
ex.  Can the blademaster have only one adjacent enemy and be able to trigger his power and deal an additional 10 points damage to the same enemy or does there have to be a second target?

Thanks in advance for the clarifications!   What a fun game... 
1) No
2) I don't think so.

I must admit I, and non of the people I have played with have considered using this power on the same target as we've treated it as a cleave (hit one target and continue the blow onto another.) But now you have mentioned it the wording does seem ambiguous. I would still say no as it does not say "to the target or another adjacent creature." Other order cards do say "to the target" when an affect applies to the target.

The wording of the card says that whenever a target takes damage from this creature's melee attack this power activates. As such it activates even if there is no valid target, but because it says CAN, you pick wether or not to apply the power. Note that is says 1 adjacent CREATURE, not enemy creature, so it can target your own people too (Not that currently there would be any reason to) This is especially important to note for creatures like the Half Orc Thug or the Copper Dragon (Both in Cormyr) who always deal damage to creatures adjacent to the target, even if they are your creatures, because they do not have the CAN keyword. Also note that both their triggers are "makes a ranged attack" which means you deal damage to surrounding creatures even if the target negated all damage.
Thanks Argemon, I'm with you.  I think the wording is ambiguous and seems to say it can all be one target but that the intention is probably that the extra 10 dmg has to target a different adjacent target.  So I'll be playing out the latter way.
FLASHING BLADES:  Whenever a target takes damage from this creature's melee attack, this creature can deal 10 DAMAGE  to 1 adjacent creature.

I don't believe there is meant to be any ambiguity, intention of the power is to allow flexibility.  You can deal the 10 damage to the original target of the attack or to another creature adjacent to the attacker. 

Good call on the creature being damaged, enemy or ally.  Any takers on when it would be an advantage to damage your own creature?
As yet, I can see no reason why you would wish to damage an ally, but what came to mind was Final Fantasy computer game series. During many of those if one of your party got confused, the easiest way to stop them attacking you was to hit them with a weak attack, this breaks the confuse. To translate it to this game, probably a card that completely stops a creature's actions until they take damage for example, thus forcing you to damage your own creature or leave it unusable and taking up leadership. This means you are not only helping your opponent kill that creature, but also using the attack of another of your creatures to do so.

Another example might be a creature that has an effect with the trigger "when this creature takes damage."

Both situations are hypothetical at the moment, but who knows with future releases?



As for the ambiguity of Flashing Blades; it does not mention the initial target in the extra damage section, so it could mean to include the original target or not. It depends on the developer's intent.

As I said we have been playing it like a cleave, but thinking about it: both creatures with Flashing Blades (Drow Blademaster and Human Ranger) are dual wielding, so it could very well mean striking out with the second weapon... I might revise my original opinion. I will discuss it at my local gaming store and see what the consensus is. Anyone else with an argument one way or the other?
I think that the game is more strategically interesting, if the Blademaster can only use his power on a second creature. This debate has come up in a game that I played.  It can easily be interpretted either way. 

One reason that I like this interpretation is because the Blademaster can take a five foot step after an attack to reach another opponent (assuming that he still has movement).  Or he could play an order card that give him movement as a minor action in order to reach a second creature.  Having extra mobility is critical for the Blademaster to fuction properly.

Because the Drow Blademaster's ability is a trigger, it goes on the stack immediately.  You can't add Minors to the stack while something else is waiting to happen (not clear from the rulebook sadly, but clarified by Chris in a thread here) so you can't use Stalk etc to get extra movement before the trigger resolves.  If there were an immediate that let you move you could, but there isn't one ATM and one is unlikely to appear since it'd be super powerful as a defense card.

As for the initial question: barring errata, you can definitely use the ability on the same creature you just hit.  There's no "another", so there's no ambiguity in the rules; when you hit a creature, you get a trigger that lets you hit again.

Flavor wise this also makes sense; both of the creatures that have Flashing Blades are two weapon users on the figure.  What's happening is that they hit you with the off-hand attack.  Like in traditional D&D, they can use the off-hand attack against the same target or a different one.

(Also, Flashing Blades is sadly quite bad even if you can hit the same guy twice because cowering is so effective against it; it'd be even worse if you had to have two guys next to you to even deal your full damage!) 
Cowering isn't that effective against Flashing Blade. If you look at the figures out there, 1 Level = 1 Morale = rougly 20 HPs. So if you cower against Human Ranger you're mostly even, and cowering against Drow Blademaster is actually under the curve (you're taking 2 Morale damage instead of 30 HPs).

Flashing Blade is actually pretty decent against smaller creatures, like Goblins, which are IMO currently the best strategy available (though I think they're going to lose a lot of effectiveness once Undeads are out). It's ineffective against bruiser strategies that use Block 10 or can easily protect against the initial 20 damage of the Blademaster.

I was thinking Human Ranger, where it sucks to only do 10 damage for prevention and cowering.  Blademaster is fine since 20 base/30 total is actually pretty good for a creature of that level.  But I'm still not super impressed with either of those creatures.  Then again, I also disagree that goblin swarming is a particularly powerful thing atm.
Would someone please post an official and definitive answer to this question?

Can Flashing Blades ability be used against the same creature during the same Activation?

I have my pride riding on the answer to this question.    
Definitive answer was given by Ultiville: "As for the initial question: barring errata, you can definitely use the ability on the same creature you just hit.  There's no "another", so there's no ambiguity in the rules; when you hit a creature, you get a trigger that lets you hit again."

The only differences between Flashing Blades and just a more powerful regular attack are that the Flashing Blades damage can be negated for 10 HP cheaper (ie a prevent 20 damage is enough to block all 30 total damage from the Drow Blademaster, and a prevent 10 damage is enough to block all 20 damage from the Human Ranger) but the tradeoff is that Flashing Blades is slightly more flexible; you can break 10 damage off onto a second target IF YOU WISH; so for example under the right circumstances the Drow Blademaster could kill both a 20 hp and a 10 hp creature with 1 attack if you are standing adjacent to both of them and they have no defence and don't cower; whereas if you had just a 30 damage attack you could normally kill only 1 of them.

It's a relatively minor power and overall net worse than having 2 attacks unless your enemy is running a mook swarm, and I agree that the Human Ranger in particular is an underpowered creature.
Here's a question though: Blademaster attacks a creature with Block 10; he hits for 10 damage with the initial damage.  Does the block 10 activate a second time and block the follow-up damage as well, or is this treated as damage from the same source and thus not blocked twice?
Here's a question though: Blademaster attacks a creature with Block 10; he hits for 10 damage with the initial damage.  Does the block 10 activate a second time and block the follow-up damage as well, or is this treated as damage from the same source and thus not blocked twice?



Sadly, "Source" in Dungeon Command means "discrete thing on the stack" so block 10 basically just destroys all the Flashing Blades dudes; that's a big reason I think it's a liability over just doing all the damage at once.
But for a level 3 blademaster to do 30 damage per attack when block 10 isn't around is decent compared to other level 3 cards, none of which swing for thirty. It is defintely situational, but versus for example a goblin deck it can be quite effective. My opponent will tend to cower the first 20 to avoid the 10 though. Perhaps I should start going Tarkon Draal...