Top 10 Dungeons & Dragons monsters

What would you like to playtest? What are the best monsters you have encountered in your game life? I ask because it might be interesting to see how the playtest handles the monsters that people most like.


 Blue’s list:


10. metal master, a creature by Ed Greenwood that can manipulate magnetic fields. creaturecatalog.enworld.org/converted/vi...


9. Executioners hood, from Dungeonland


8. Trolls, I just like trolls and bridges.


7. Illithid


6. Stone Dragon


5. Daemonix


4. Drider


3. Cave fisher


2. Eye of Fate by Zak S.

1.Orcs


Those are my picks. I posted a youtube video that explains them more thoroughly if anyone wants to know why those monsters have worked for me. It is here -à www.youtube.com/watch?v=etEtXHAE4WY&feat... *if anyone does check out the video please leave a "thumbs up" or a comment just so I can figure out if the video's are worth the time to make. Thank you.


I hope this is something that interests people, I think that monsters are really central to the game, and so far it seems like we haven’t talked much about them.


 

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  1. Illithid

  2. Cloud giant

  3. Ogre mage

  4. Rust monster

  5. Djinn

  6. Housecat

  7. Lizardfolk

  8. Roc

  9. Purple worm

  10. Mimic

Nice, but why the Roc? 
Rot grub, ear seeker, lurker above, trapper, piercer, mimic, gray ooze, rust monster, yellow mold, and sphere of annihilation.

All monsters to make you wish you hadn't come down to the dungeon.

Hang on, did I say 'sphere of annihilation'? Yes I did - it's technically not a monster but has caused a great deal of deaths by masquerading as dark empty space instead of a large black orb hanging suspiciously in the air.

Honorable mention: the bookworm.
Nice, but why the Roc? 


My next campaign is Arabian-Nights themed, so the roc is a creature that is probably going to see some use.  Also, the roc is a weird creature that is part killing machine, part trainable flying carpet.  Like to see how they balance that.
10. Goblins
9. Illithids
8. Elementals
7. Rust Monster
6. Golems of every sort.
5. Orcs
4. Purple Worms
3. Trolls
2. Tarrasque
1. Dragons

Why my top 3?

Trolls to me are some of the funnest fights in D&D. They are hard to kill and, for some reason, I find them easy to give a lot of personality to.

The Terrasque is on the list because it is the most sought after monster to kill in the entire MM. For a long, long time it was basically the mythical "End boss" of D&D

And Dragons...what more can be said? They come in so many shapes and sizes, personalities and powers, it's easy to do anything with a dragon. Not to mention that they are very intelligent so you can let them do whatever they like without having to worry about whether they would be able to pull it off. Simple versaitility wins the list.
My two copper.
Black dragon
Calastryx (Threats from the Nentir Vale)
Drow
Orcs
Illithid
Headless corpse (from pyramid of shadows)
Scaladars
Beholders
Succubus
D&D Next Medusa

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Medusa gettin some love. I like it.
My two copper.
Medusa gettin some love. I like it.

Have you seen Zak S's interpretation of medusie Jenks? He loves them and has done some really neat stuff with that idea.

I personally LOVE Save or Die monsters. Not for what they do to the players' characters, but what it does to the players. When they know a medusa is around, they suddenly get all paranoid. It's fun to watch.
My two copper.
I personally LOVE Save or Die monsters. Not for what they do to the players' characters, but what it does to the players. When they know a medusa is around, they suddenly get all paranoid. It's fun to watch.


After I committed a very quick and ignominious TPK with a 3E beholder that left the players grumbling, I offered them a rematch.  I rewrote the beholder so its deadly eye rays did (IIRC) 2d4 damage to an appropriate ability score, and killed or petrified them when the score hit zero.  This went over much better.  The beholder was still a special kind of threat, but it wasn't a luck-based fight; they could respond to and defend against these rays.

Medusas aren't so bad because you've always been given a choice to avert your eyes:  again, an opportunity to respond to and defend against the threat.
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I personally LOVE Save or Die monsters. Not for what they do to the players' characters, but what it does to the players. When they know a medusa is around, they suddenly get all paranoid. It's fun to watch.


After I committed a very quick and ignominious TPK with a 3E beholder that left the players grumbling, I offered them a rematch.  I rewrote the beholder so its deadly eye rays did (IIRC) 2d4 damage to an appropriate ability score, and killed or petrified them when the score hit zero.  This went over much better.  The beholder was still a special kind of threat, but it wasn't a luck-based fight; they could respond to and defend against these rays.

Medusas aren't so bad because you've always been given a choice to avert your eyes:  again, an opportunity to respond to and defend against the threat.




Yeah, I think save or die is too much. Level drainers create the same sort of hesitancy, and that’s easier for me to justify offering corrective magic for. The full-blown Resurrection is a big deal, and it works better if kept that way. Where as restoring lost levels is more akin to removing a curse, at least in my head.

I personally LOVE Save or Die monsters. Not for what they do to the players' characters, but what it does to the players. When they know a medusa is around, they suddenly get all paranoid. It's fun to watch.



Yeah, it's one thing I find is really lacking in 4E. The monters just aren't scary enough. Nothing actually instills fear in the PCs.
I personally LOVE Save or Die monsters. Not for what they do to the players' characters, but what it does to the players. When they know a medusa is around, they suddenly get all paranoid. It's fun to watch.



Yeah, it's one thing I find is really lacking in 4E. The monters just aren't scary enough. Nothing actually instills fear in the PCs.



Even level drainers?
No particular order:

The original Rust Monster
Beholder
Medusa
Giletanous Cube
Piercer
Mimics (specifically floor or ceiling one)
Hecuva
Mind Flayer
Abeloth
Dragons

and have to chime in on the Tarrasque too.  Awesome creature.

Hrm.... there are really two types of D&D moster: classic beasts from mythology and ones unique to D&D. I like both for very different reasons.
But if I had to make a list...

10. Gnolls
9. Mimics
8. Draconians
7. Fihyrs
6. Mind Flayers
5. Skeletons & zombies
4. Vampires
3. Bugbears
2. Dragons
1. Pathfinder's goblins. I love them so much. 

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I have to vote....Beholder and all ten of its little eyes.

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Ghouls
Grimlocks
Medusa
Gnolls
Mimics
Hobgoblins
Beholders
Minotaurs
4e Brown Dragons
Maruts

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I have to vote....Beholder and all ten of its little eyes.



That's 11, disqualified.
My two copper.
No love for Displacer Beast? My top five in no order.
Displacer Beast, Specters, Trolls, Mean Archmages, and Giant Scorpions. All fun to fight.

  1. Dragon

  2. Beholder

  3. Mind Flayer

  4. Rust monster

  5. Bulette

  6. Gelatinous Cube

  7. Ghoul

  8. Banshee

  9. Mimic

  10. Githyanki

No love for Displacer Beast? My top five in no order. Displacer Beast, Specters, Trolls, Mean Archmages, and Giant Scorpions. All fun to fight.


Displacer cloak is one of my fav magic items.  Does that count?  

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1. Goblin - I love running goblins as a Dm. They run, they find friends, they turn on each other It makes for an engaging and dynamic early dungeon.
2. Golem - i like the dungeon design opportunities that these guys provide
3. Rust monster
4. Mind flayer
5. Gnoll - These guys can make for pretty scary stuff and i love thier look
6. Dragons
7. gelatenous cube
8. Humans - i think people forget these guys
9. Lich
10. Giant - i love the dungeon design opportunity they provide
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In order for me to feel I've got a good handle on the game, I need to see mobs, tough solo 'boss' monsters, what happens when monsters can do the same spells characters can, and 'surprise' monsters that resist obvious character tactics.  For those purposes:

1.) Green slime / BlackPudding / Ochre Jelly (someday I'm making an all-jelly dungeon, swear to golly)
2.) Goblins (the archetypal mob monster)
3.) Lich (as powerful and smart as the PCs, plus summoning skelebuddies, etc)
4.) Beholder (The ultimate solo monster, IMNSHO.  Living artillery barrage)
5.) Rust Monster (Ok, you swing your sword at it.  Oopsie)
6.) Mind Flayer (ick factor, plus the fun of mindless drones)
7.) Vampire (Particularly if the PCs don't start knowing it is one)
8.) Aboleth (turning them against one another, always amusing)
9.) Dragon (old-school - claw, claw, wing buffet, tail whip, bite, breath weapon...okay, pc's turn)
10.) Ettin (something about the two heads always said 'real' giant to me)
10)  Mooncalves.  A personal favorite of mine from the 3E Monster Manual II.  If you haven't tried running one yet, I highly recommend it.
9)  Swarms.  The DM's change-up pitch.
8)  Goblins.  Of all the evil humanoids, these always seem to present the most flexible and diverse threat.
7)  Inevitables.  LN outsiders are actually scary now.
6)  Liches and death knights.  Two sides of the same coin, in my eyes:  powerful and intelligent undead with long-term goals.
5)  Mind flayers.  Because they flay minds.
4)  Giants.  There's just something primally satisfying about taking on a guy who's three times your size and winning.
3)  Devils.  Cunning, calculating, and evil beyond imagination.
2)  Dragons.  No surprise here.  They are literally the name of the game.
1)  NPCs. Nothing is as scary to a party as another party that is as smart, skilled, and coordinated as they are.
No love for Displacer Beast?


I actually really hate them.  Gygaxian randomness at its worst.

What would you like to playtest? What are the best monsters you have encountered in your game life? I ask because it might be interesting to see how the playtest handles the monsters that people most like.


Well, I doubt some of these will ever see the light of day again (officially, that is), but here are some of my favorite monsters from throughout the years.





  1. Wizards

  2. Devourers

  3. Ghouls

  4. Dragons

  5. Elves

  6. Oni

  7. Thri-kreen

  8. Foulspawn

  9. Kobold

  10. Goblins

  

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Orcs
Skeletons
Lizard Folk
Medusa
Minotaur
Wererat
Dragons
Ghost
Evil NPC's
and Gnolls    
10. Kobolds, for when I want to explore traps and cowardly thieves.
9. Gnolls, savage brutal humanoids whose behavior can really shock the players.
8. Dryads, satyrs, nymphs, pixies, selkies, not as much in a straight fight, but it allows me to add a sense of humor to the game and these monsters also have a tendency to scare my players (in a positive way).
7. Dopplegangers
6. Werewolves
5. Mad cultists
4. Dragons
3. Aboleths, psionic slavers that also warp your appearances to fit their ships and who have racial memory.
2. Ghosts, I just have something with ghost stories.
1. Devils, especially the intelligent negotiating manipulating types (such as the erinyes/succubus) and preferably not in a straight fight.

Come to think of it, I really like horror stories where bad things happen behind a veneer of civilisation, which probably explains the prevelence of monsters that hide amongst the sheep.

Come to think of it, I really like horror stories where bad things happen behind a veneer of civilisation, which probably explains the prevelence of monsters that hide amongst the sheep.




The older I get the less interested I am in running the whole murder hobo hack fest game. Adventures that revolve around scary singular monsters that must be tracked down or out smarted are becoming a bigger part of my world. 

There are times when tactical exercise and outright warfare can be good for the game, for those moments I have modeled my goblinoid races after the Warhammer 40k orcs. They are spawned from fungus. They are impossible to reason with and only concerned with war and destruction. There are no mothers with young in their liars to create moral dilemma. 

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