Cavalier's Defender Aura and Commanding Vow feat

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Does the cavalier's defender aura subject an enemy entering the aura to my divine sanction? Thereby, triggering my feat Commanding Vow?

Commanding Vow's Benefit
: Whenever you subject an enemy adjacent to you to your divine sanction, you can slide that enemy 1 square as a free action

If so, would I be able to constantly slide a charging enemy out of melee effectiveness considering the enemy doesn't have melee reach?

I'm building a character for Kill the Wizard Lair Assault game and would appreciate any feedback.

To all that is good and worthwhile.

Does the cavalier's defender aura subject an enemy entering the aura to my divine sanction? Thereby, triggering my feat Commanding Vow?

Commanding Vow's Benefit
: Whenever you subject an enemy adjacent to you to your divine sanction, you can slide that enemy 1 square as a free action

If so, would I be able to constantly slide a charging enemy out of melee effectiveness considering the enemy doesn't have melee reach?

I'm building a character for Kill the Wizard Lair Assault game and would appreciate any feedback.



No. Divine Sanction is only applied by powers that apply Divine Sanction. Even Divine Challenge does not apply Divine Sanction.

Because Defender's Aura can potentially effect up to eight enemies on a flat plane, a lot of effects that trigger off of marks are incompatible with Defender's Aura.

Cavalier Aura is not Divine Sanction. Ever.
Would be pretty cool if it was, though.  Would make the Cavalier not so horribly worthless.  Maybe.
D&D Next = D&D: Quantum Edition
If the paladin has the divine challenge, which class uses divine sanction then?

To all that is good and worthwhile.

Divine Sanction is not a class feature.
D&D Next = D&D: Quantum Edition
Mand12, is it a power? Belonging to which class or theme? Thanks for the quick reply. I've been treating all divine markings and auras as divine sanction.

To all that is good and worthwhile.

No.  It's a condition, technically.

It's like asking what class or theme does Immobilized come from.
D&D Next = D&D: Quantum Edition
I found it on the online DDI compendium. Only paladins may use it from my understanding.


Divine Sanction

Many new paladin powers and some of the new feats subject a target to your divine sanction. Being subject to it means the target is marked by you for a duration specified in the description of the power or feat. Unless otherwise noted, the mark ends before the specified duration if someone else marks the target.
Until the mark ends, the target takes radiant damage equal to 3 + your Charisma modifier the first time each round it makes an attack that doesn’t include you as a target. The damage increases to 6 + your Charisma modifier at 11th level and 9 + your Charisma modifier at 21st level.
Divine sanction is meant to complement divine challenge. You can use divine challenge to mark one creature and use divine sanction to mark others. Divine sanction has fewer restrictions than divine challenge so that you can easily use the two in concert.

Published in Divine Power, page(s) 82.

To all that is good and worthwhile.

Yes, it came from DP in the Paladin section, but nothing in that requires you to be a paladin.

If you are a half-elf, for example, and pick up Ardent Strike you gain the full benefit of Divine Sanction, just the same as you get the slide if you choose Eldritch Strike even if you're not a warlock.

"Until the mark ends, the target takes radiant damage equal to 3 + your Charisma modifier the first time each round it makes an attack that doesn’t include you as a target. The damage increases to 6 + your Charisma modifier at 11th level and 9 + your Charisma modifier at 21st level."

This is the only actual rules text in that section.
D&D Next = D&D: Quantum Edition
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