Expertise! Expertise for everyone! (yes, you spellcasters call it metamagic)

So, now half of the base classes have got the Expertise feature.
What about extending the same principle/game mechanic to every class?

Class Expertise: You gain a single expertise die, a d4. You can spend an expertise die to use a class specific feature/maneuver/tecnique/spell (a new word is needed) with the [Expertise] tag.
You must be able to take actions to spend an expertise die. At the Start of each of your turns, you regain all your spent expertise dice. As you gain levels, the size of the die increases (from a d4 to a d6 for instance) and you gain additional dice as noted on the Expertise Table.
At 1st level you generally get a a free Expertise feat, refer to the class description.

Why: 
* easier multiclassing/ability merging. You only access your character pool of expertise for every class you have. All of your classes share the same per-round pool of expertise (option: you may keep these pools separated: you have no pool for a class until you get a new expertise die from the progression. You may also retrain to switch 1, 2 or all dice from a pool to another. There are 3 pools for now: martial, arcane, divine)
* give back some versatility to spellcasters. Magic is not an art if there's no variation or freedom.

Ideas: 

Arcane Concentration (aka Metamagic, uses Concentration Dice):
 
Note: you have to consume the spell slot to use Concentration Dice on it. Cantrips/Horizons are spells that can be cast at will only because they're simple. If you use Concentration Dice on a 0 level spell, that spell slot is expended, even if you'd normally retain it.
A wizard recovers all Concentration Dice every 10 minutes or a short rest.
A sorcerer recovers it at the start of each round as usual.

Warmage Edge [War Wizard tradition only, Metamagic] 
When you cast a spell that inflicts damage, you can spend concentration dice to increase the spell's damage against a single target. Roll all the concentration dice you spend and add up their results. The spell deals that extra damage against that target. You may share your expertise dice among different targets as long as you have enough dice to spend (that is, at level 10 you may choose to use your 3d10 pool to inflict +1d10 to 3 different targets of the spell). 

Still Spell [Metamagic]
When you cast a spell that has a somatic component, you can spend a single concentration die to cast that spell with no somatic gestures.

Silent Spell [Metamagic]
When you cast a spell that has a verbal component, you can spend a single concentration die to cast that spell with no need to speak. You can also spend a single die to silence all the auditory part of the spell (explosions, burst, screams), only the targets will hear that.

Focused Spell [Metamagic]
When you cast a spell you can use concentration dice to increase its potency. For every die you spend you raise the spell's DC by 1 point.

Shielding Spell [Abjurer only, Metamagic]
When you cast a spell you can use concentration dice to create a temporary shield that protects you.
The effect is identical to the Shield spell, but lasts until the start of your next turn. Roll all the concentration dice you spend. The highest die result is the AC bonus the spell gives you for that round.

Quicken Spell [Metamagic]
When you cast a spell you may attempt to quicken it on the fly.
Choose the spell, roll all the concentration dice you spend and subtrat 5 from the highest result. If this value equals or is higher than the spell's slot level you're using, you don't use an action to cast it.
If it is lower, this concentration dice is wasted.

Lasting Spell [Metamagic]
When a spell with fixed duration longer than 1 round (1 minute, 1 hours, etc.) is about to expire due to reaching its time limit, you may continuously try to extend its duration a few more rounds.
When the spell is going to expire and is on its last round of duration, you may expend a single concentration die. You extend its duration by that amount.
SPECIAL: When you use a die in this way, you don't regain it until the spell expires. You can spend other concentration dice you have left to extend the spell duration even further, one die per time.

Divine Channelling (Channel Divinity, uses Faith Dice): 

Turn Undead [Channel Divinity]

[in short] When you channel your god's power, you may use it to damage, heal, rebuke or command undeads.
Rebuke/Command - As an action, roll all the channelling dice you spend and multiply the higher by 10. That number is the number of hit point of undeads affectect by your turning attempt. Starting from the undead with the lowest hit points in the area, you rebuke/command every undead whose maximum hit points are lower than the result, subtracting their full health from the total and comparing the result to the next undead with lowest maximum hit points.
Heal/Damage - As an action, roll all the channelling dice you spend and sum up the results. You damage(or heal if you're a cleric of an evil deity) undeads in a 30 feet radius explosions by that amount.
SPECIAL: channelling dice spent this way only recharges after 10 minutes.

Lay on hands [Channel Divinity]
When you channel your god's power, you may use it to heal (or damage if you worship an evil deity) a creature you touch. If the recipient is not willing you have to make a magic attack against it; if you miss, the channelling dice is not spent.
Roll all the channelling dice you spend and sum the results. The target is healed/damaged by that amount.
(variant: pick the highest result. The target may use up to that amount of dice from its reserve of hit dice to heal. Instead, you may burn the same amount of healing hit dice from the target.)
SPECIAL: channelling dice spent this way only recharges after 10 minutes.

Healing Word [Channel Divinity]
When you channel your god's power, you may use it to heal your comrades from a distance.
[works as the new Word of power spells, but the amount you heal is determined by the highest roll of the spent channelling dice (remember, it's per round) and you need a whole action to do it (no secondary actions)]
 

What do you think?
These are just a few examples, but I believe almost everything may be converted in this way.

There may also be a few neat expertise tricks for multiclass characters, such as

Imbue Weapon [Expertise, Metamagic]
Prerequisite: Deadly Strike or Sneak Attack
If you cast a spell with elemental damage and you're wielding a weapon, you may imbue your weapon with that element.
When you deal extra damage with the Deadly Strike or Sneak Attack maneuver, you may choose one or more dice to inflict elemental damage of the same type of the spell you've cast.

Sword and Ball [Expertise, Metamagic]
If you spend 2 expertise dice (1 expertise, 1 concentration if you're using the separated pools option), you may cast a spell and make a single attack as part of the same action.

Magic from the Gods [Expertise, Metamagic]
When you cast an arcane spell on willing creatures, you can spend expertise dice to heal them.
You roll one die per desired target and heal each target by that amount.

Mindstorming and ideas on how to tweak the Wizard class (hp, AC, class features):
[And so, you chose to be a wizard...]

I would gladly mindstorm this idea.  Stick it in the mindforge.  Bang it with a mindhammer.  I was looking for some feedback earlier on a similar idea.

community.wizards.com/go/thread/view/758...

One of the biggest issues I have found is trying to make the classes less homogenous.  A similar mechanic for all classes tends to do that.  Much like 4e's 2/2/2/1 format. 

"The Apollo moon landing is off topic for this thread and this forum. Let's get back on topic." Crazy Monkey

I have to agree with the sect of players who believe that expertise dice being the new bread and butter is a bad idea. It is a good conceptual idea, and people want to turn a nice unique mechanic into a staple for all (taking away the feel of uniqueness for classes).

On the other hand it is D&D tradition, whenever the fighter gets a nice new toy the other classes get newer better ones. 
Modules are not a bad idea.  And neither is brainstorming.

"The Apollo moon landing is off topic for this thread and this forum. Let's get back on topic." Crazy Monkey

First lets have combat maneuvers for all with a decent share of ranged maneuvers. I'm on the fence with expertise as an all encompassing mechanic. I like metamagic so build a system and lets see.
I didn't mean to sound so dissenting, I dont like ED for all and I explained why.
My intention was to be part of the brainstorm process (and I am pro module for just about everything people want.) even if it is the downside as opposed to all upsides.
I don't like it. I would rather we leave ED with the fighter and maybe rogue (I am not even sure I like that). I don't think anyone else should use the mechanic. 
First lets have combat maneuvers for all with a decent share of ranged maneuvers. I'm on the fence with expertise as an all encompassing mechanic. I like metamagic so build a system and lets see.



How did we manage to agree for once...  I thought that wasnt allowed.
  Creative Character Build Collection and The Magic of King's and Heros  also Can Martial Characters Fly? 

Improvisation in 4e: Fave 4E Improvisations - also Wrecans Guides to improvisation beyond page 42
The Non-combatant Adventurer (aka Princess build Warlord or LazyLord)
Reality is unrealistic - and even monkeys protest unfairness
Reflavoring the Fighter : The Wizard : The Swordmage - Creative Character Collection: Bloodwright (Darksun Character) 

At full hit points and still wounded to incapacitation? you are playing 1e.
By virtue of being a player your characters are the protagonists in a heroic fantasy game even at level one
"Wizards and Warriors need abilities with explicit effects for opposite reasons. With the wizard its because you need to create artificial limits on them, they have no natural ones and for the Warrior you need to grant permission to do awesome."

 

ED for metamagic and staff/dart maneuvers is banging in theory. I'm just concerned with two things. By my estimation as atwill spells cantrips are already OP. With fewer vancian slots it will make the Wizard awfully predictable in their metamagic use. A good solution is to just make cantrips 0 level spells and force the Wizard to burn ED to make one atwill. You have to balance them else it will be ray of cold spam until lvl 5 or 6.
I think ED should stick with the Fighter and Rogue for the base classes. You've got an idea that's pretty cool. I politely disagree with in Core.
ED for metamagic and staff/dart maneuvers is banging in theory. I'm just concerned with two things. By my estimation as atwill spells cantrips are already OP. With fewer vancian slots it will make the Wizard awfully predictable in their metamagic use. A good solution is to just make cantrips 0 level spells and force the Wizard to burn ED to make one atwill. You have to balance them else it will be ray of cold spam until lvl 5 or 6.



Yes ray of cold spam is ... damn it I warned you we were agreeing... dang. Ok as a general scenario at-will cantrips dont have to be over powered for instance allow ray of cold to slow the target .. .until its hit with enough expertise.
  Creative Character Build Collection and The Magic of King's and Heros  also Can Martial Characters Fly? 

Improvisation in 4e: Fave 4E Improvisations - also Wrecans Guides to improvisation beyond page 42
The Non-combatant Adventurer (aka Princess build Warlord or LazyLord)
Reality is unrealistic - and even monkeys protest unfairness
Reflavoring the Fighter : The Wizard : The Swordmage - Creative Character Collection: Bloodwright (Darksun Character) 

At full hit points and still wounded to incapacitation? you are playing 1e.
By virtue of being a player your characters are the protagonists in a heroic fantasy game even at level one
"Wizards and Warriors need abilities with explicit effects for opposite reasons. With the wizard its because you need to create artificial limits on them, they have no natural ones and for the Warrior you need to grant permission to do awesome."

 

There are some that may not like the idea of full on expertise dice mechanic for all.  That's okay. 

Modules! (battle cry voice)

Now, here are some reasons for liking it:

1) Its a module, don't plug it in if you hate the idea
2) Its a module, plugs effortlessly into the core
3) Power levels are easy to control
4) Character options are streamlined yet open up to unlimited concept building
5) Supports Themes and Backgrounds
6) Supports Action/Move/Reaction
7) Supports all three Tiers
8) Supports ToTM and Grid
9) Supports Advantage/Disadvantage mechanic


"The Apollo moon landing is off topic for this thread and this forum. Let's get back on topic." Crazy Monkey

I would like to see an ED caster.  Sorcerer or blaster of some sort.  It has a basic ray attack, and can spend a die to mix elements, one to add split the ray, one to make it a burst, add them for damage, ect...

But i don't want ED for all.

5e houserules and tweaks.

Celestial Link Evoking Radiance into Creation

A Party Without Music is Lame: A Bard

Level Dip Guide

 

4e stuff

guides
List of no-action attacks.
Dynamic vs Static Bonuses
Phalanx tactics and builds
Crivens! A Pictsies Guide Good
Power
s to intentionally miss with
Mr. Cellophane: How to be unnoticed
Way's to fire around corners
Crits: what their really worth
Retroactive bonus vs Static bonus.
Runepriest handbook & discussion thread
Holy Symbols to hang around your neck
Ways to Gain or Downgrade Actions
List of bonuses to saving throws
The Ghost with the Most (revenant handbook)
my builds
F-111 Interdictor Long (200+ squares) distance ally teleporter. With some warlord stuff. Broken in a plot way, not a power way.

Thought Switch Higher level build that grants upto 14 attacks on turn 1. If your allies play along, it's broken.

Elven Critters Crit op with crit generation. 5 of these will end anything. Broken.

King Fisher Optimized net user.  Moderate.

Boominator Fun catch-22 booming blade build with either strong or completely broken damage depending on your reading.

Very Distracting Warlock Lot's of dazing and major penalties to hit. Overpowered.

Pocket Protector Pixie Stealth Knight. Maximizing the defender's aura by being in an ally's/enemy's square.

Yakuza NinjIntimiAdin: Perma-stealth Striker that offers a little protection for ally's, and can intimidate bloodied enemies. Very Strong.

Chargeburgler with cheese Ranged attacks at the end of a charge along with perma-stealth. Solid, could be overpowered if tweaked.

Void Defender Defends giving a penalty to hit anyone but him, then removing himself from play. Can get somewhat broken in epic.

Scry and Die Attacking from around corners, while staying hidden. Moderate to broken, depending on the situation.

Skimisher Fly in, attack, and fly away. Also prevents enemies from coming close. Moderate to Broken depending on the enemy, but shouldn't make the game un-fun, as the rest of your team is at risk, and you have enough weaknesses.

Indestructible Simply won't die, even if you sleep though combat.  One of THE most abusive character in 4e.

Sir Robin (Bravely Charge Away) He automatically slows and pushes an enemy (5 squares), while charging away. Hard to rate it's power level, since it's terrain dependent.

Death's Gatekeeper A fun twist on a healic, making your party "unkillable". Overpowered to Broken, but shouldn't actually make the game un-fun, just TPK proof.

Death's Gatekeeper mk2, (Stealth Edition) Make your party "unkillable", and you hidden, while doing solid damage. Stronger then the above, but also easier for a DM to shut down. Broken, until your DM get's enough of it.

Domination and Death Dominate everything then kill them quickly. Only works @ 30, but is broken multiple ways.

Battlemind Mc Prone-Daze Protecting your allies by keeping enemies away. Quite powerful.

The Retaliator Getting hit deals more damage to the enemy then you receive yourself, and you can take plenty of hits. Heavy item dependency, Broken.

Dead Kobold Transit Teleports 98 squares a turn, and can bring someone along for the ride. Not fully built, so i can't judge the power.

Psilent Guardian Protect your allies, while being invisible. Overpowered, possibly broken.

Rune of Vengance Do lot's of damage while boosting your teams. Strong to slightly overpowered.

Charedent BarrageA charging ardent. Fine in a normal team, overpowered if there are 2 together, and easily broken in teams of 5.

Super Knight A tough, sticky, high damage knight. Strong.

Super Duper Knight Basically the same as super knight with items, making it far more broken.

Mora, the unkillable avenger Solid damage, while being neigh indestuctable. Overpowered, but not broken.

Swordburst Maximus At-Will Close Burst 3 that slide and prones. Protects allies with off actions. Strong, possibly over powered with the right party.

I used the PT2 Fighter's mechanic for my psion class: right here.
Feedback Disclaimer
Yes, I am expressing my opinions (even complaints - le gasp!) about the current iteration of the play-test that we actually have in front of us. No, I'm not going to wait for you to tell me when it's okay to start expressing my concerns (unless you are WotC). (And no, my comments on this forum are not of the same tone or quality as my actual survey feedback.)
A Psion for Next (Playable Draft) A Barbarian for Next (Brainstorming Still)
The DM has control over any and all classes allowed in the campaign.  Although an XD module would illustrate all the classes, it does not mean that all classes would be used or would be allowed in game.  Its entirely up to the player and DM to decide which classes are used.  A module falls under the same optional add-ons as the core.  Meaning, an XD spellcaster, gish, or martial could play along side a core spellcaster, gish, or martial.

Nice Psion, Greatfrito

"The Apollo moon landing is off topic for this thread and this forum. Let's get back on topic." Crazy Monkey

Didn't the devs state that DMs will get tools to swap around casting systems among classes as they see fit? Wouldn't be surprised if an experimental ED casting system shows up in the DMG as well.
I would like to see an ED caster.  Sorcerer or blaster of some sort.  It has a basic ray attack, and can spend a die to mix elements, one to add split the ray, one to make it a burst, add them for damage, ect...

But i don't want ED for all.



I think that is more likely.
  Creative Character Build Collection and The Magic of King's and Heros  also Can Martial Characters Fly? 

Improvisation in 4e: Fave 4E Improvisations - also Wrecans Guides to improvisation beyond page 42
The Non-combatant Adventurer (aka Princess build Warlord or LazyLord)
Reality is unrealistic - and even monkeys protest unfairness
Reflavoring the Fighter : The Wizard : The Swordmage - Creative Character Collection: Bloodwright (Darksun Character) 

At full hit points and still wounded to incapacitation? you are playing 1e.
By virtue of being a player your characters are the protagonists in a heroic fantasy game even at level one
"Wizards and Warriors need abilities with explicit effects for opposite reasons. With the wizard its because you need to create artificial limits on them, they have no natural ones and for the Warrior you need to grant permission to do awesome."

 

I'm not against the idea, but I would be wary of pretending that "it fits effortlessly into the core."  Giving wizards ED makes them substantially more powerful than not giving them ED, and while that can be compensated for compensating is not at all effortless.  You'd have to change some pretty fundamental things to make the class balance, like rewriting every single spell in the game (or at least the damaging ones), messing with spells/day (which annoyingly pushes wizards towards the combat pillar), or both.  I'm also not a big fan of giving the fighter's new toy to the wizard who's always had cool toys, although I wouldn't mind all martial characters getting ED (and the half martial characters getting half ED).  

In terms of execution, a few suggestions.  

1) consider making caster ED an encounter resource instead of an at-will one, at least for more maneuvres.  For starters, I don't want wizards able to cast a quickened spell every single round if they're even marginally lucky, or indeed any kind of metamagic on every single spell he casts.  It would also keep him a little bit more unique from the fighter, and let the fighter shine a little more on longer encounters (since he's getting pummeled in the short ones by vancian wizards).  

2) Quickened spell: first, make the threshold 5+spell level.  It should be easier with low level spells, and it shouldn't be trivially easy to do every round at high levels.  Second, I'm not a big fan of making it a chance roll in the first place, unless it's a wild mage.  Third, I'd like to see it use up dice for the encounter, so that wizards aren't doing it every round.  Same goes for sword and ball.

3) Lasting spell: kinda neat, but I worry that it will be massively overpowered for a few spells.

4) Shielding spell: I'd sooner see it as parry-style DR, at least if it's going to be at-will.  It makes more sense to me, doesn't become prohibitively ridiculous at larger dice, and gods help you if the sorcerer gets his hands on this.

5) Lay on hands: I like pulling healing out of cleric's spells/day, it lets them do the cool stuff they're supposed to do without the rest of the party complaining that you're not playing "that kind of cleric."  Also, I miss encounter healing (in moderation, freely admit too much encounter healing is one of 4e's top 3 problems).  

6) Healing word: again, I like pulling it out of spells per day.  But at-will, even in small amounts, is a bad idea.  Not that highest of 3d10 is a particularly small amount.  Same goes for magic from the gods.
Psionics and Magic systems are pretty effortless in their integration of 3.5.  People may not like psionics but they are farely easy to work into a campaign, a DM determines if there is magic/psionic transparency then off you go.  The work would be on the XD module design team.  If it was not plug and playable it would not be a module.

Spells need to be fixed in systems that are published and in the playtest anyway, so there is less substance to that concern.  However, in my mind, the module would also focus on creating a non-Vancian spell system.

The fighters new toy thing to a brainstorm session is flagitious.

But to the OP. I would explore XD casters thoroughly.  I am.

"The Apollo moon landing is off topic for this thread and this forum. Let's get back on topic." Crazy Monkey

I've been toying with the idea of using Channel Divinity as a dice pool for use with Clerics and have been playtesting it for a while now. The Turn Undead feature works really well. The number of dice the cleric gets would be based on the following table (the same as the one I've been using with fighter):











1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
1d4
1d6
1d8
1d6, 1d4
2d6
1d8, 1d6
2d8
3d6
2d6, 1d8
2d8, 1d6
3d8
1d10, 2d8
2d8, 2d6
3d8, 1d6
4d8
3d8, 1d10
2d10, 2d8
3d10, 1d8
4d10
3d10, 1d12
1-4
1-6
1-8
2-10
2-12
2-14
2-16
3-18
3-20
3-22
3-24
3-26
4-28
4-30
4-32
4-34
4-36
4-38
4-40
4-42


Channel Divinity


You have been chosen as an agent of divine will in the mortal world. This divine favor is represented as a number of dice that you can use to perform miraculous feats such as turn undead, bless the weak, heal the sick or dying, and control nature. These dice replenish after a short rest.

Turn Undead

The gods are the shepherds of the dead. When a living creature dies, its soul passes on to an afterlife in the realms of the gods. For this reason, all deities have strong dictates regarding the undead. Good and neutral deities exhort their followers to send such creatures to their final rest, while evil ones command their clerics to use the dead as recruits, willing or unwilling, to serve their cause.


When you turn the undead, you attempt to cow them with a display of divine might. You can hold undead creatures at bay, or even destroy them if you are powerful enough. Clerics who follow evil deities can instead choose to dominate and control such creatures.


Benefit: As an action, you can spend one or more of your Channel Divinity dice to attempt to turn or destroy any undead creatures within 30 feet of you. The dice are rolled and then added up. The result is the number of levels of undead affected. The cleric may decide to “spend” these levels however they wish, using the guidelines below.


Turned: The cost to turn an undead creature is equal to its level. An undead creature that is turned cannot attack you or anyone within a 20-foot radius of you for a number of rounds equal to your level. This effect is canceled if the creatures are attacked or take damage during that time.


Destroyed: The cost to destroy an undead creature is equal to twice its level. An undead creature that is destroyed instantly bursts into flames and disintegrates into a pile of ash.


Rebuked: Evil clerics may instead choose to rebuke the creature instead of destroying it, thereby making it their thrall. The cost to rebuke an undead creature is the same as destroying it. A rebuked undead creature must obey your verbal commands, which it understands, and it cannot willing harm you. The creature can make a DC 15 Intelligence save every 24 hours to break free. A mindless undead creature does not get this saving throw; it is under your control until it is destroyed or until it is controlled by another effect, such as another cleric attempting to turn it. The rebuked creature uses your current level to determine the result of any turn attempt against it while it is within 100 feet of you.


No Effect: If the level of an undead creature is higher than the total result of the turn attempt they are unaffected. Furthermore, the cleric cannot attempt to turn that creature again for 24 hours.



D&D Next - Basic and Expert Editions

I firmly believe that there should be two editions of the game; the core rules released as a "Basic" set and a more complicated expanded rules edition released as an "Expert" set. These two editions would provide separate entry points to the game; one for new players or players that want a more classic D&D game and another entry point for experienced gamers that want more options and all the other things they have come to expect from previous editions.

Also, they must release several rules modules covering the main elements of the game (i.e., classes, races, combat, magic, monsters, etc.) upon launch to further expand the game for those that still need more complexity in a particular element of the game.


Here's a mockup of the Basic Set I created.



(CLICK HERE TO VIEW LARGER IMAGE)
  

Basic Set

This boxed set contains a simple, "bare bones" edition of the game; the core rules. It's for those that want a rules-light edition of the game that is extremely modifiable or for new players that get intimidated easily by too many rules and/or options. The Basic Set contains everything needed to play with all the "classic" D&D races (i.e., Human, Dwarf, Elf, and Halfling) and classes (i.e., Cleric, Fighter, Rogue, Wizard) all the way up to maximum level (i.e., 20th Level).

The Basic boxed set contains:

Quick Start Rules
A "choose your own way" adventure intended as an intro to RPGs and basic D&D terms.

Player's Handbook
(Softcover, 125 pages)
Features rules for playing the classic D&D races and classes all the way up to 20th level.

Dungeon Master's Guide

(Softcover, 125 pages)
Includes the basic rules for dungeon masters.

Monster Manual
(Softcover, 100 pages)
Includes all the classic iconic monsters from D&D. 

Introductory Adventure
(Keep on the Borderlands)
An introductory adventure for beginning players and DMs.

Also includes: 

Character Sheets
Reference Sheets
Set of Dice


Expert Set

A set of hardbound rules that contains the core rules plus expanded races and classes, more spells and a large selection of optional rules modules — that is, pretty much everything that experienced players have come to expect. Each expert edition manual may be purchased separately, or in a boxed set. The Expert set includes:

Expert PHB (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes core rules plus 10 playable races, 10 character classes, expanded selection of spells and rules modules for players.)
Expert DMG (Hardcover, 250 pages. $35 Includes core rules plus expanded rules modules for DMs.)
Expert MM (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes an expanded list of monsters and creatures to challenge characters)


Expansions

These expansion rules modules can be used with both the Basic and Expert sets. Each expansion covers one specific aspect of the game, such as character creation, combat, spells, monsters, etc.) 

Hall of Heroes (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes a vast selection of playable character races and classes, new and old all in one book)
Combat and Tactics (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes dozens of new and old optional rules for combat all in one book)
Creature Compendium (Hardcover, 350 pages.$35 Includes hundreds of monsters, new and old all in one book)
The Grimoire (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes hundreds of new and old spells all in one book)





A Million Hit Points of Light: Shedding Light on Damage

A Million Hit Points of Light: Shedding Light on Damage and Hit Points

In my personal campaigns, I use the following system for damage and dying. It's a slight modification of the long-standing principles etsablished by the D&D game, only with a new definition of what 0 or less hit points means. I've been using it for years because it works really well. However, I've made some adjustments to take advantage of the D&D Next rules. I've decided to present the first part in a Q&A format for better clarity. So let's begin...

What are hit points?
The premise is very simple, but often misunderstood; hit points are an abstraction that represent the character's ability to avoid serious damage, not necessarily their ability to take serious damage. This is a very important distinction. They represent a combination of skillful maneuvering, toughness, stamina and luck. Some targets have more hit points because they are physically tougher and are harder to injure...others have more because they are experienced combatants and have learned how to turn near fatal blows into mere scratches by skillful maneuvering...and then others are just plain lucky. Once a character runs out of hit points they become vulnerable to serious life-threatening injuries.

So what exactly does it mean to "hit" with a successful attack roll, then?
It means that through your own skill and ability you may have wounded your target if the target lacks the hit points to avoid the full brunt of the attack. That's an important thing to keep in mind; a successful "hit" does not necessarily mean you physically damaged your target. It just means that your attack was well placed and forced the target to exert themselves in such a way as to leave them vulnerable to further attacks. For example, instead of severing the target's arm, the attack merely grazes them leaving a minor cut.

But the attack did 25 points of damage! Why did it only "graze" the target?
Because the target has more than 25 hit points. Your attack forced them to exert a lot of energy to avoid the attack, but because of their combat skill, toughness, stamina and luck, they managed to avoid being seriously injured. However, because of this attack, they may not have the reserves to avoid your next attack. Perhaps you knocked them off balance or the attack left them so fatigued they lack the stamina to evade another attack. It's the DM's call on how they want to narrate the exact reason the blow didn't kill or wound the target.

Yeah, but what about "touch" attacks that rely on physical contact?
Making physical contact with a target is a lot different than striking them, so these types of attacks are the exception. If a touch attack succeeds, the attacker manages to make contact with their target.

If hit points and weapon damage don't always represent actual damage to the target, then what does it represent?
Think of the damage from an attack as more like a "threat level" rather than actual physical damage that transfers directly to the target's body. That is, the more damage an attack does, the harder it is to avoid serious injury. For example, an attack that causes 14 points of damage is more likely to wound the target than 3 points of damage (depending on how many hit points the target has left). The higher the damage, the greater the chance is that the target will become seriously injured. So, an attack that does 34 points of damage could be thought of as a "threat level of 34." If the target doesn't have the hit points to negate that threat, they become seriously injured.

Ok, but shouldn't armor reduce the amount of damage delivered from an attack?
It does reduce damage; by making it harder for an attack to cause serious injury. A successful hit against an armored target suggests that the attack may have circumvented the target's armor by striking in a vulnerable area.

What about poison and other types of non-combat damage?
Hit point loss from non-physical forms of damage represents the character spitting the poison out just in time before it takes full strength or perhaps the poison just wasn't strong enough to affect them drastically, but still weakens them. Again, it's the DMs call on how to narrate the reasons why the character avoids serious harm from the damage.

If hit points don't don't represent actual damage then how does that make sense with spells like Cure Serious Wounds and other forms of healing like healer kits with bandages?
Hit points do represent some physical damage, just not serious physical damage. Healing magic and other forms of healing still affect these minor wounds just as well as more serious wounds. For example, bandaging up minor cuts and abrasions helps the character rejuvenate and relieve the pain and/or fatigue of hit point loss. The key thing to remember is that it's an abstraction that allows the DM freedom to interpret and narrate it as they see fit.

What if my attack reduces the target to 0 or less hit points?
If a player is reduced to 0 or less hit points they are wounded. If a monster or NPC is reduce to 0 or less hit points they are killed.

Why are monsters killed immediately and not players?
Because unless the monsters are crucial to the story, it makes combat resolution much faster. It is assumed that players immediately execute a coup de grace on wounded monsters as a finishing move.

What if a character is wounded by poison or other types of non-physical damage?
If a character becomes wounded from non-combat damage they still receive the effects of being wounded, regardless if they show any physical signs of injury (i.e., internal injuries are still considered injuries).

Ok. I get it...but what happens once a character is wounded?
See below.
 

Damage and Dying

Once a character is reduced to 0 or less hit points, they start taking real damage. In other words, their reserves have run out and they can no longer avoid taking serious damage.

  1. Characters are fully operational as long as they have 1 hit point or more. They may have minor cuts, bruises, and superficial wounds, but they are are not impaired significantly. 
  2. Once they reach 0 or less hit points, they become Wounded (see below).That is, they have sustained a wound that impairs their ability to perform actions.
  3. If they reach a negative amount of hit points equal or greater than their Constitution score, they are Incapacitated. This means they are in critical condition and could possibly die.
  4. Characters will die if their hit points reach a negative amount greater than their Constitution score, plus their current level.

Unharmed: 1 hp or more
Wounded: 0 hp or less
Incapacitated: -(Constitution) to -(Constitution+Level)
Dead: Less than -(Constitution +Level)

Wounded
When the character reaches 0 or less hit points they become wounded. Wounded characters receive disadvantage on all attacks and saving throws until they heal back up to 1 hit point or more. This allows for a transitory stage between healthy and dying, without having to mess around with impairment rules while the character still has hit points left.

Incapacitated
Characters begin dying when they reach a negative amount of hit points equal to their Constitution score. At which point, they must make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw on each of their following turns (the disadvantage from being wounded does not apply for these saving throws).

If successful, the character remains dying, but their condition does not worsen.

If the saving throw fails, another DC 10 Constitution saving throw must be made. If that one fails, the character succumbs to their wounds and dies. If successful, the character stabilizes and is no longer dying.

Finally, if a dying character receives first aid or healing at any point, they immediately stabilize.

Dead
Characters will die if they reach a negative amount of hit points equal to their Constitution, plus their current level. Thus, if an 8th level character with a Constitution score of 12 is down to 4 hit points then takes 24 points of damage (reducing their hit points to -20) the attack kills them outright.

Nice Turn Undead write-up

"The Apollo moon landing is off topic for this thread and this forum. Let's get back on topic." Crazy Monkey

Not so say "I told ya so" but, when they introduced CS for the fighter, I predicted that it would get given to another class, and then eventually become available to casters, and the fighter would be back to having nothing unique going for him again.  I'm not psychic or anything, it's just empiricism - any time the fighter gets a cool toy, it gets given to other classes and spells get made up to give it to casters.  

So, now half of the base classes have got the Expertise feature.
What about extending the same principle/game mechanic to every class?

Keep in mind that ED are prettymuch the major feature of the classes that have them.  A caster using such a system wouldn't be Vancian.  It might be a good way to do a 5e Warmage (which isn't on the agenda, yet, not being in a PH1) or maybe a 3.5-like Warlock or post-Essentials-like Elemental Sorcerer.

 

 

Oops, looks like this request tried to create an infinite loop. We do not allow such things here. We are a professional website!

I have to agree with the sect of players who believe that expertise dice being the new bread and butter is a bad idea. It is a good conceptual idea, and people want to turn a nice unique mechanic into a staple for all (taking away the feel of uniqueness for classes).

On the other hand it is D&D tradition, whenever the fighter gets a nice new toy the other classes get newer better ones. 



I'd have rather seen this stay as a Fighter only thing too.

Not that the Rogue didn't need SOMETHING (though, personally, I think this just emphasises my argument that oD&D had it right and Rogue isn't a separate concept from Fighter).

And one of the main reasons why people rejected 4th Edition (and one of the things I, though a fan, didn't like about it) was that all classes used the same mechanics.

Let's not repeat that mistake, no matter how cool the mechanic.       
I don't mind the idea of dice pools for every class, as long as each class remains unique in how those dice pools are used. Right now, the rogue is a cheap carbon copy of the fighter...which needs to change. Their dice should be called something different and their special features or "maneuvers" should NEVER mimic the fighter's stuff. The rogue is NOT a fighter and they need to stop trying to turn them into fighters. They are rogues.

In other words; STOP STEALING THE FIGHTER'S STUFF ROGUE! Wink

That said...

In the case of the Channel Divinity feature I mentioned a few posts back, I'm rather pleased with how the Turn Undead feature is working with a dice pool mechanic in my playtests. Of all the ways I've handled the cleric's turning ability in the past, this is by far my favorite way of handling it.


D&D Next - Basic and Expert Editions

I firmly believe that there should be two editions of the game; the core rules released as a "Basic" set and a more complicated expanded rules edition released as an "Expert" set. These two editions would provide separate entry points to the game; one for new players or players that want a more classic D&D game and another entry point for experienced gamers that want more options and all the other things they have come to expect from previous editions.

Also, they must release several rules modules covering the main elements of the game (i.e., classes, races, combat, magic, monsters, etc.) upon launch to further expand the game for those that still need more complexity in a particular element of the game.


Here's a mockup of the Basic Set I created.



(CLICK HERE TO VIEW LARGER IMAGE)
  

Basic Set

This boxed set contains a simple, "bare bones" edition of the game; the core rules. It's for those that want a rules-light edition of the game that is extremely modifiable or for new players that get intimidated easily by too many rules and/or options. The Basic Set contains everything needed to play with all the "classic" D&D races (i.e., Human, Dwarf, Elf, and Halfling) and classes (i.e., Cleric, Fighter, Rogue, Wizard) all the way up to maximum level (i.e., 20th Level).

The Basic boxed set contains:

Quick Start Rules
A "choose your own way" adventure intended as an intro to RPGs and basic D&D terms.

Player's Handbook
(Softcover, 125 pages)
Features rules for playing the classic D&D races and classes all the way up to 20th level.

Dungeon Master's Guide

(Softcover, 125 pages)
Includes the basic rules for dungeon masters.

Monster Manual
(Softcover, 100 pages)
Includes all the classic iconic monsters from D&D. 

Introductory Adventure
(Keep on the Borderlands)
An introductory adventure for beginning players and DMs.

Also includes: 

Character Sheets
Reference Sheets
Set of Dice


Expert Set

A set of hardbound rules that contains the core rules plus expanded races and classes, more spells and a large selection of optional rules modules — that is, pretty much everything that experienced players have come to expect. Each expert edition manual may be purchased separately, or in a boxed set. The Expert set includes:

Expert PHB (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes core rules plus 10 playable races, 10 character classes, expanded selection of spells and rules modules for players.)
Expert DMG (Hardcover, 250 pages. $35 Includes core rules plus expanded rules modules for DMs.)
Expert MM (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes an expanded list of monsters and creatures to challenge characters)


Expansions

These expansion rules modules can be used with both the Basic and Expert sets. Each expansion covers one specific aspect of the game, such as character creation, combat, spells, monsters, etc.) 

Hall of Heroes (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes a vast selection of playable character races and classes, new and old all in one book)
Combat and Tactics (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes dozens of new and old optional rules for combat all in one book)
Creature Compendium (Hardcover, 350 pages.$35 Includes hundreds of monsters, new and old all in one book)
The Grimoire (Hardcover, 225 pages. $35 Includes hundreds of new and old spells all in one book)





A Million Hit Points of Light: Shedding Light on Damage

A Million Hit Points of Light: Shedding Light on Damage and Hit Points

In my personal campaigns, I use the following system for damage and dying. It's a slight modification of the long-standing principles etsablished by the D&D game, only with a new definition of what 0 or less hit points means. I've been using it for years because it works really well. However, I've made some adjustments to take advantage of the D&D Next rules. I've decided to present the first part in a Q&A format for better clarity. So let's begin...

What are hit points?
The premise is very simple, but often misunderstood; hit points are an abstraction that represent the character's ability to avoid serious damage, not necessarily their ability to take serious damage. This is a very important distinction. They represent a combination of skillful maneuvering, toughness, stamina and luck. Some targets have more hit points because they are physically tougher and are harder to injure...others have more because they are experienced combatants and have learned how to turn near fatal blows into mere scratches by skillful maneuvering...and then others are just plain lucky. Once a character runs out of hit points they become vulnerable to serious life-threatening injuries.

So what exactly does it mean to "hit" with a successful attack roll, then?
It means that through your own skill and ability you may have wounded your target if the target lacks the hit points to avoid the full brunt of the attack. That's an important thing to keep in mind; a successful "hit" does not necessarily mean you physically damaged your target. It just means that your attack was well placed and forced the target to exert themselves in such a way as to leave them vulnerable to further attacks. For example, instead of severing the target's arm, the attack merely grazes them leaving a minor cut.

But the attack did 25 points of damage! Why did it only "graze" the target?
Because the target has more than 25 hit points. Your attack forced them to exert a lot of energy to avoid the attack, but because of their combat skill, toughness, stamina and luck, they managed to avoid being seriously injured. However, because of this attack, they may not have the reserves to avoid your next attack. Perhaps you knocked them off balance or the attack left them so fatigued they lack the stamina to evade another attack. It's the DM's call on how they want to narrate the exact reason the blow didn't kill or wound the target.

Yeah, but what about "touch" attacks that rely on physical contact?
Making physical contact with a target is a lot different than striking them, so these types of attacks are the exception. If a touch attack succeeds, the attacker manages to make contact with their target.

If hit points and weapon damage don't always represent actual damage to the target, then what does it represent?
Think of the damage from an attack as more like a "threat level" rather than actual physical damage that transfers directly to the target's body. That is, the more damage an attack does, the harder it is to avoid serious injury. For example, an attack that causes 14 points of damage is more likely to wound the target than 3 points of damage (depending on how many hit points the target has left). The higher the damage, the greater the chance is that the target will become seriously injured. So, an attack that does 34 points of damage could be thought of as a "threat level of 34." If the target doesn't have the hit points to negate that threat, they become seriously injured.

Ok, but shouldn't armor reduce the amount of damage delivered from an attack?
It does reduce damage; by making it harder for an attack to cause serious injury. A successful hit against an armored target suggests that the attack may have circumvented the target's armor by striking in a vulnerable area.

What about poison and other types of non-combat damage?
Hit point loss from non-physical forms of damage represents the character spitting the poison out just in time before it takes full strength or perhaps the poison just wasn't strong enough to affect them drastically, but still weakens them. Again, it's the DMs call on how to narrate the reasons why the character avoids serious harm from the damage.

If hit points don't don't represent actual damage then how does that make sense with spells like Cure Serious Wounds and other forms of healing like healer kits with bandages?
Hit points do represent some physical damage, just not serious physical damage. Healing magic and other forms of healing still affect these minor wounds just as well as more serious wounds. For example, bandaging up minor cuts and abrasions helps the character rejuvenate and relieve the pain and/or fatigue of hit point loss. The key thing to remember is that it's an abstraction that allows the DM freedom to interpret and narrate it as they see fit.

What if my attack reduces the target to 0 or less hit points?
If a player is reduced to 0 or less hit points they are wounded. If a monster or NPC is reduce to 0 or less hit points they are killed.

Why are monsters killed immediately and not players?
Because unless the monsters are crucial to the story, it makes combat resolution much faster. It is assumed that players immediately execute a coup de grace on wounded monsters as a finishing move.

What if a character is wounded by poison or other types of non-physical damage?
If a character becomes wounded from non-combat damage they still receive the effects of being wounded, regardless if they show any physical signs of injury (i.e., internal injuries are still considered injuries).

Ok. I get it...but what happens once a character is wounded?
See below.
 

Damage and Dying

Once a character is reduced to 0 or less hit points, they start taking real damage. In other words, their reserves have run out and they can no longer avoid taking serious damage.

  1. Characters are fully operational as long as they have 1 hit point or more. They may have minor cuts, bruises, and superficial wounds, but they are are not impaired significantly. 
  2. Once they reach 0 or less hit points, they become Wounded (see below).That is, they have sustained a wound that impairs their ability to perform actions.
  3. If they reach a negative amount of hit points equal or greater than their Constitution score, they are Incapacitated. This means they are in critical condition and could possibly die.
  4. Characters will die if their hit points reach a negative amount greater than their Constitution score, plus their current level.

Unharmed: 1 hp or more
Wounded: 0 hp or less
Incapacitated: -(Constitution) to -(Constitution+Level)
Dead: Less than -(Constitution +Level)

Wounded
When the character reaches 0 or less hit points they become wounded. Wounded characters receive disadvantage on all attacks and saving throws until they heal back up to 1 hit point or more. This allows for a transitory stage between healthy and dying, without having to mess around with impairment rules while the character still has hit points left.

Incapacitated
Characters begin dying when they reach a negative amount of hit points equal to their Constitution score. At which point, they must make a DC 10 Constitution saving throw on each of their following turns (the disadvantage from being wounded does not apply for these saving throws).

If successful, the character remains dying, but their condition does not worsen.

If the saving throw fails, another DC 10 Constitution saving throw must be made. If that one fails, the character succumbs to their wounds and dies. If successful, the character stabilizes and is no longer dying.

Finally, if a dying character receives first aid or healing at any point, they immediately stabilize.

Dead
Characters will die if they reach a negative amount of hit points equal to their Constitution, plus their current level. Thus, if an 8th level character with a Constitution score of 12 is down to 4 hit points then takes 24 points of damage (reducing their hit points to -20) the attack kills them outright.

I speculate that dice pool mechanics would work well with a lot of features and a lot of classes.

But there can only be one finely wrapped present under the tree it seems.

"The Apollo moon landing is off topic for this thread and this forum. Let's get back on topic." Crazy Monkey

Just a little premise (part 1/3):
I'm not saying ED should be everyone's cup of tea or that it should be core, this is pure brainstorming, and as Miladoon said, I'd love to make it an option, or a module, and with some work it could esily be plugged or unplugged in a campaign.
I also disagree on the "you're stealing things from the warrior, they will all look the same, it will be OPowered!". If for one second you put apart cantrips, what's left to wizard and clerics in terms of flexibility?. White space. It's not even 1 feat every 5 levels, it's... tradition. 1 class feature and a rechargeable slot. Boring.

The Metamagic feats I presented were a bit rough, I know, I wrote them on the fly, they were just a starting point for further brainstorming.

I think part of the fun of playing a caster was being able to shape magic. You "feel" in charge. Magic shouldn't be a static power like in 4.0.

Sooner or later we'll be getting a monk, a psion, a barbarian, and eventually a psionic fighter.
I believe they're going to use the same maneuver mechanic/ED as well.
Call it Ki, Focus, Rage, all of them are probably going to get maneuvers and ED. So, why not the casters?
I can't believe I'm saying that... I perceived 4.0 classes to be pretty dull and flat, and now I'm kind of reducing the class uniqueness Sealed...maybe. At least fighters don't have daily powers anymore :P

Applying metamagic on the fly is/was actually a sorcererous thing. But now I see At will spells, rechargeable spells and so on, so I believe I'm not crossing the line so much. I expect the Sorcerer to use a mechanic like this to shape spells... and better.
I believe giving a sorcerer and a wizard the same ED metamagic wouldn't make them more similar than before. Sorcerers will still be able to cast the same spell over and over again, just differently, and this won't be so evident for the wizard.

Now, part 2/3, answering a few posts here and there

I have to agree with the sect of players who believe that expertise dice being the new bread and butter is a bad idea. It is a good conceptual idea, and people want to turn a nice unique mechanic into a staple for all (taking away the feel of uniqueness for classes).

On the other hand it is D&D tradition, whenever the fighter gets a nice new toy the other classes get newer better ones. 


Well, what if I call Expertise Dice like MetaMartial Maneuvers? It's the fighter that has been granted a new degree of freedom. And personally I like what they did. What I don't like, is that they took stuff away from the casters "for speed and simplicity's sake".

First lets have combat maneuvers for all with a decent share of ranged maneuvers. I'm on the fence with expertise as an all encompassing mechanic. I like metamagic so build a system and lets see.


I agree, a player in my party is playing an archer and feels a bit short with options. That's why he's pushing me a bit to build up an Arcane Archer based on ED ;)
If you've got some ideas, I'd happily brainstorm with them

ED for metamagic and staff/dart maneuvers is banging in theory. I'm just concerned with two things. By my estimation as atwill spells cantrips are already OP. With fewer vancian slots it will make the Wizard awfully predictable in their metamagic use. A good solution is to just make cantrips 0 level spells and force the Wizard to burn ED to make one atwill. You have to balance them else it will be ray of cold spam until lvl 5 or 6.


You're right. I think I'll just say that cantrips are just spells that you've mastered.
The cantrip's execution is perfect. This means you can't cast them any better, that's why they all look the same.
So, no metamagic on 0 level spells, with maybe an exception for Quicken Spell, you have to use a slot to use your ED on it. 0 level spells are at-will because they're easy to cast and the gestures are always the same. If you want to cast a 0 level spell with ED, you're NOT doing the same gestures, you're putting effort, and it vanishes from the mind as all prepared spells.

I used the PT2 Fighter's mechanic for my psion class: right here.


That's pure awesomeness, well written, and it'll be a source of inspiration for me, just let me study it a bit. I may also consider to let one of my players use it, "feels" core
I like how we ended up with similar ideas implemented in similar ways, it's promising

@BhaelFire: that's really a neat variant of the Channel Divinity feature, love it! Anyway, I think it should be better to use the default dice progression (it would defeat my intent of unificating the 4 classes with a single progression). Also, I think that letting the cleric choose which undead is effected first is somehow less dramatic, I'm more for the "weak fall first, than focus on the big ones".

Now, part 3/3:

NEW IDEAS and TWEAKS:

* A wizard recovers all Concentration Dice every 10 minutes or after a short rest.
A sorcerer recovers it at the start of each round as usual.

* Do you want to build a Wild mage? Remove the spell DC increase column of the wizard, and let the player use one of its ED to set the spell's DC. Do you want it to be higher? Roll more dice, use the highest. Smile

* Do you want to start building a Monk? Ki Dice's the answer Wink feel free to propose an approach to the class.Here's an idea:

Flurry of blows [Ki Focus]
Your unarmed technique allows you to land a blow and slip another attack against the same target or another.
Effect: When you hit a creature with an unarmed attack, you can spend Ki Dice to make an extra attack against a target in reach. Use the same attack roll, but the damage you inflict is the sum of the Ki Dice used against that target. You may use 1 die per target, or all your Ki Dice on a single one, or split them at your choice.

* How should I call the dice for the wizard(and cleric)? greatfrito did a great job on the psion and called it "Focus Dice", that powers "Augmentations" that are dictated by "Paths/Disciplines"
So, what should power "Metamagic"? "Concentration Dice"? even "Spell Focus" is ambiguous
How should I name the Metamagic paths? 
Ideas: Tactician Caster, Close Combat Caster, Artillery Caster, Elemental Specialist, Wild Caster, Sword Enchanter, Bow Enchanter.

* Oh, maybe I've found the core of the class. The Fighter's got Deadly Strike. Wizard has got:

Steady Spell [Concentration]
You can use your spell mastery to avoid being distracted.
When you need to make a check to avoid a spell to be disrupted, roll all the Concentration dice you spend. Add the highest die to the result.

Mindstorming and ideas on how to tweak the Wizard class (hp, AC, class features):
[And so, you chose to be a wizard...]


I also disagree on the "you're stealing things from the warrior, they will all look the same, it will be OPowered!". If for one second you put apart cantrips, what's left to wizard and clerics in terms of flexibility?.

Vancian casting is tremendously flexible.  A wizard can be virtually an entirely different build, optimized to tackle the expected challenge of the coming day, just be preparing a different slate of spells.


 

 

Oops, looks like this request tried to create an infinite loop. We do not allow such things here. We are a professional website!


I also disagree on the "you're stealing things from the warrior, they will all look the same, it will be OPowered!". If for one second you put apart cantrips, what's left to wizard and clerics in terms of flexibility?.

Vancian casting is tremendously flexible.  A wizard can be virtually an entirely different build, optimized to tackle the expected challenge of the coming day, just be preparing a different slate of spells.


I agree, but somehow I feel that even after the last packet (that tuned up the casters a bit), the casters are still missing that glimpse of freedom that made them interesting. Or maybe it's just me that like classes that are a little bit more complex.

Anyway, saying that everyday a wizard can be totally different sounds to me like having a fighter with lots of shiny magic weapons to choose from every morning. You pick one, then you push the attack button repeatedly.

Making such comparisons is a bit hard and is a bit forced, but I'd like to stress out the fact that a warrior doesn't always pick up a different weapon everyday, yet they can use the same weapon in lots of ways thanks to their ability and maneuver repertoire.

On the other side, while a piece of metal has so many uses, specialists of "the Art" every morning pick up their 1shot-per-day mental wands and press the fire button just hoping they're going to be useful.
Where's the "Art" in all this?
I don't feel the wizard/sorcerer/cleric have any control on the spells. Once they choose the visuals (if the DM allows it) it's all fixed and static.

There's no more mistery or magic behind spellcasters, even their party members know all their spells, and they always have the same effects.
"Oh, the wiz's dead. Pick another! - What? You don't have THAT spell? You should study it!"

This is why I'd like to have a few more options for them. Maybe not with ED, but since WoTC gave it to Rogues, can't possibly give it to other melee combatants like the monk or the barbarian?
I think that's the direction they're going to take, so I believe some mindstorming about that can't hurt Wink


I'm dropping a few lines on the Wizard module as I write,
what about calling Wizard's Fighting Style feature:


  • Arcane Style

  • Arcane Mastery

  • Arcane Agenda

  • Arcane Curriculum

  • Arcane Studies

  • Modus Operandi

  • Arcane Specialization


and his maneuvers


  • Arcane Feats

  • Specializations

  • Researches

  • Subjects

  • Powers

  • Techniques?


You should be able to use it in a sentence like:
"At 1st level you choose your [Casting Style]. Every 3 levels you may choose a [Arcane Feat] among those offered by your [Casting Style]."


I'm also thinking about:


  • Giving 1 arcane feat every 3 levels, maybe every 2 for the sorcerer.

  • The wizard will get all his expertise dice every 1 minute after first use. At the beginning of the round for the sorcerer.

  • No spell DC increase table: you automatically use unexpended expertise dice with the Spell Potency power you receive at 1st level to raise your spell's DC by 1 for each unexpended die.
    Thus, if you use expertise dice, you're lowering your spell's DC accordingly. 

  • At level 1 you have to choose your Casting Style among: Tactician CasterClose Combat CasterArtillery CasterElemental SpecialistWild CasterSword EnchanterBow Enchanter.



Concept for the Armored Casting Arcane Feat:


Armored Casting [Arcane Feat]
You learn how to adapt your gestures into even more intricate ones to compensate mobility limitations imposed by your armor.
Effect: Depending on which kind of armor you don, you constantly reserve one or more expertise dice to cast your spells. You constantly use 1 die to cast while donning light armors, 2 for medium and 3 for heavy armors. You recover these reserved dice as normal only after undonning the armor. You have to be proficient in the use of the armor you're wearing.

Granted automatically at 1st level, replaces the DC increase column:

Spell Potency [Arcane Feat]
You constantly employ your mathematical mind to empower your spells when you cast them in their canonical form.
Effect: Whenever you cast a spell, its DC is increased by the current number of unspent expertise die. 

Mindstorming and ideas on how to tweak the Wizard class (hp, AC, class features):
[And so, you chose to be a wizard...]

Anyone know if there is a group out there discussing XD for other classes?  Maybe we can start one.

"The Apollo moon landing is off topic for this thread and this forum. Let's get back on topic." Crazy Monkey

Anyone know if there is a group out there discussing XD for other classes?  Maybe we can start one.


I don't know, this is why I opened a topic, it would be a nice idea.



I decided to put some order, and here's my first complete playable draft of the XD Wizard. 

MODULE LINK: Wizard (Expertise Dice Module) v0.15 by Drahiricomadus 

Feel free to leave a comment on the document or here
(also on suggesting better names/errors, better wording, etc.)

It has been plugged on the Wizard class, but can easily be adapted on the Sorcerer and the Cleric.

For example, the Sorcerer could have a faster recharging (every round instead of every minute), and a slower Arcane Feats progression.


Now, it's the Monk turn.

I'll start with the "core" maneuver:

Flurry of blows
Your unarmed technique allows you to land a blow and chain another attack against the same target or another.
Effect: When you hit a creature with an unarmed attack, you can spend expertise dice to make an extra unarmed attack against a target in reach. Use the same attack roll, but you only inflict damage equal to the expertise die you spent against that target.
You can use this maneuver multiple times, against the same target or another, as long as you've got expertise dice to spend.

What do you think?

Mindstorming and ideas on how to tweak the Wizard class (hp, AC, class features):
[And so, you chose to be a wizard...]

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