The Length of a Turn

13 posts / 0 new
Last post
So, just thinking around about this. You can only take one standard action a turn, correct? Thus, a standard action must take up more than half of a turn. You can only take a maximum of two moves, thus, they must take up more than a third of a turn. You can only take three minors, thus they must take up more than a quarter of a turn. A quick addition turns out that each turn must take up at least 13/12 turns. And, if we add in immediate actions, which can only be used once per turn and must take up at least half a turn, then a turn takes up more than 19/12 turns. Des anyone see an error here, and how is this possible?
A round is about 6 seconds. A turn has no defined lenght.

Also there is no limit as to how many standard, move or minor actions you can take in a turn. You get one of each on your turn, but if you have ways to gain more of them (Action Points, Eldritch Speed, Urgent Aggression etc..) you can certainly take them with no usage limitation.

Also, Immediate actions can be used once per round, not once per turn.

Opportunity action 1/turn
Immediate action 1/round

A turn is 'however long it takes you to do your stuff'.  A round is 'however long it takes everybody to do their stuff'.
Another day, another three or four entries to my Ignore List.
It's also important to keep in mind that actions are abstractions used to both keep the game fair and running smoothly.  While we may resolve the game using turn-based mechanics, in the narrative, everyone is acting simultaneously with everyone else in any given round.  And all of those actions, more or less, flow into each other.

At the table, the player of the dragonborn fighter decides to move 5 squares to an orc (move), shield bash it (standard), and uses his dragonbreath (minor).  His movement triggers an opportunity attack from a kobold, but it misses.

In narrative, for example, this could happen in one fluid motion.  The dragonborn fighter is barreling down on his foe.  Before he even reaches his target, he's already raising his shield, both to slam into the orc and simultaneously deflect a stray attack from a kobold whose too preoccupied with a different target to take full advantage of the opportunity.  Immediately after his shield makes contact with the orc, before the orc's feet even return to the ground, he blasts the orc to cinders with a gout of lightning.

Though that's just one way the actions could be described.
Thinking about creating a race for 4e? Make things a lil' easier on yourself by reading my Race Mechanic Creation Guide first.
So, just thinking around about this. You can only take one standard action a turn, correct? Thus, a standard action must take up more than half of a turn. You can only take a maximum of two moves, thus, they must take up more than a third of a turn. You can only take three minors, thus they must take up more than a quarter of a turn. A quick addition turns out that each turn must take up at least 13/12 turns. And, if we add in immediate actions, which can only be used once per turn and must take up at least half a turn, then a turn takes up more than 19/12 turns. Des anyone see an error here, and how is this possible?



These don't have set time costs.  Whatever you do with your turn, it takes 6 seconds.
Its not a turn that takes 6 seconds, but a round.

If your turn would take 6 seconds, the duration of a round would be affected by the number of creature acting. A round always have about the same duration regardless of the number creatures taking turns.

RC 189 Round: A round represents about 6 seconds in the game world. In a round, every combatant takes a turn.

If your turn would take 6 seconds, the duration of a round would be affected by the number of creature acting. A round always have about the same duration regardless of the number creatures taking turns.

That's because all creatures are assumed to take their turn simultaneously, it's just for the benefit of us human players that we take the turns one creature at a time.

I dont know if your assumption is written anywhere.


Also there's some creatures able to take more than one turn during a round...(ex. Dolgrim Warrior. Ettin Berserker etc..)
I dont know if your assumption is written anywhere.


Also there's some creatures able to take more than one turn during a round...(ex. Dolgrim Warrior. Ettin Berserker etc..)

PHB.

The actions in a combat encounter happen almost
simultaneously in the game world, but to make combat
manageable, combatants take turns acting—like taking
turns in a board game
6 seconds per turn is one of those assumed rules that are a holdover from 3e.  It doesn't exist anywhere in 4e.
D&D Next = D&D: Quantum Edition
6 seconds per turn is one of those assumed rules that are a holdover from 3e.  It doesn't exist anywhere in 4e.


PHB  266

"Round: ... A round represents about 6 seconds in the game world."

 
I dont know if your assumption is written anywhere.


"The actions in a combat encounter happen almost simultaneously in the game world, but to make combat manageable, combatants take turns acting..."
Mand is correct, it is a holdover from 3e. The narrative idea is that everything happens at the same time, the mechanical idea is that you have turns. A "full-round action" wouldn't be one turn in 4e, it'd be your turn+immediates+opportunities+free actions you could have taken. And even that really isn't sufficient, because of the fluff ideas about you are constantly looking around (which is why facing doesn't matter), you are defending yourself, etc. 

A round being six seconds doesn't mean your turn is six seconds. You can do a lot of things in a round outside your turn.
 PHB.

The actions in a combat encounter happen almost
simultaneously in the game world, but to make combat
manageable, combatants take turns acting—like taking
turns in a board game



Ha Thanks Alcestis!  (Also found in RC 189)
Sign In to post comments