How encompassing is Magic Weapon enhancement?

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sorry it count like damage from an attack like the breath weapon of a dragon the RC never say that "Corrosive acid deals 1d6 points of damage per round of exposure" in her Throwing Splashing Weapon section, this are weapons and work like that in the damage.
Pepe pecas pica papas con un pico con un pico pepe pecas pica papas si pepe pecas pica papas con un pico donde esta el pico con que pepe pecas pica papas.
And that is precisely my point Oma, An Acid Flask is Acid Damage. So the rules under Acid Effects apply.

That the Splash exposure to acid deals 1d6 damage (ie a round of exposure) it means that it doesn't require a "full round of exposure" to deal the damage, it happens instantly.

The Flask of Acid is a Mundane item, it contains the same mundane acid described in your trap. Being splashed counts as a round of exposure.

Under your rules You could easily jump into a pool of acid, swim to the bottom and get back out in the same round without taking damage otherwise.  As I described you could even cross a large pool of acid this way without taking any damage.

You are basically saying that you could jump in, be totally immersed in acid and get out without taking any damage, but if someone threw a flask of the same acid on you you woudl take damage? 

Complete and utter Bull Oma     

you are the one to call that rule and is you take the damage per round of exposure then if a player is to fast maybe he can do it without take damage like a normal person that walk in the fire.
Pepe pecas pica papas con un pico con un pico pepe pecas pica papas si pepe pecas pica papas con un pico donde esta el pico con que pepe pecas pica papas.

again rule compendium have the last update of the rules.

Introduction
The book you hold in your hands is the definitive guide for
how to play the 3.5 revision of the DUNGEONS & DRAGONS
Roleplaying Game. Years in the making, it gathers resources
from a wide variety of supplements, rules errata, and rules
clarifications to provide an authoritative guide for playing
the D&D game. It updates and elucidates the rules, as well
as expanding on them in ways that make it more fun and
easier to play. When a preexisting core book or supplement
differs with the rules herein, Rules Compendium is
meant to take precedence. If you have a question on how
to play D&D at the table, this book is meant to answer
that question.
Rules Compendium isn’t just a compilation of the rules
you need to play D&D. It’s also a celebration of the 3rd
Edition of the world’s most popular roleplaying game.
Those who’ve worked on the game in past years have taken
the time to comment on the rules and share experiences
with you in these pages. You’ll find anecdotes, house
rules, history, and more in these asides and essays. If
the rules in this book don’t show you anything new, the
designers, developers, and editors who commented here
just might.


This sounds to me like:

Hey I know you already own all the books for this game but you REALLY need to buy this one as well.  Why?  Well because we've decided that we need you to buy this book and to make that happen we are going to make all kinds of little bitty changes that your rule lawyers are going to eventually find and beat you with.  Oh, and if there are somehow any errors in this book then you're just seeing things and don't worry because they'll now be a permanent part of the game as we move on to our next project which we expect you to buy everything in that as well.  Ha, ha, suckers.....

you are the one to call that rule and is you take the damage per round of exposure then if a player is to fast maybe he can do it without take damage like a normal person that walk in the fire.



More often than not, the fire-walkers are 'taking damage', just not showing it (ya know, mind over matter).  There are a few charlatans out there that are cheating (clear protection, etc), but more often than not, it's just a case of taking the pain.
you are the one to call that rule and is you take the damage per round of exposure then if a player is to fast maybe he can do it without take damage like a normal person that walk in the fire.



Fair enough Oma, but define "Too Fast" because yes I agree with you on that and go one further, because you can put your arm into a pot of molten steel and take it out again without being burnt if you A: make sure your arm is wet and B: go really fast.

So define "too Fast"

Swift Action? Free Action? maybe a Waterfall of acid that you duck under while running as fast as you can before jumping in a pool of water? Sure why not, but it's a house rule.

But that isn't what we are talking about is it, we are talking about, at the very least a move action to swim at one-quarter speed through the acid to the bottom, completely under, and then up to the surface and side, again swimming is at one-quarter speed to the side and pulling ourselves out bodily, all in heavy armor.

That really doesn't count as fast enough to not take damage now does it?
you are the one to call that rule and is you take the damage per round of exposure then if a player is to fast maybe he can do it without take damage like a normal person that walk in the fire.



More often than not, the fire-walkers are 'taking damage', just not showing it (ya know, mind over matter).  There are a few charlatans out there that are cheating (clear protection, etc), but more often than not, it's just a case of taking the pain.

pain like this ???


Mother Cyst


( Libris Mortis: The Book of the Dead, p. 28)

[General]


You gain the ability to cast necrotic cyst spells by growing a cyst of your own.


Prerequisite


Knowledge (religion) 2 ranks, Caster level 1st,


Benefit


You grow an internal cyst of undead fl esh called a mother cyst. The cyst may be noticeable as a discolored swelling on your skin, if desired. The mother cyst is slightly painful, but otherwise isn't harmful. The mother cyst grants you access to a selection of cyst-related spells listed below (and described in Chapter 4 of this book). You cast these spells like any other spell you can cast, once you host a mother cyst (if you are a caster who prepares spells, you can prepare all necrotic cyst spells without referring to a spellbook, as if you had the Spell Mastery feat for each such spell). Necrotic Cyst Spells: 1st--necrotic awareness; 2nd--necrotic cyst, necrotic scrying; 3rd--necrotic bloat; 4th--necrotic domination; 5th--necrotic burst; 6th--necrotic eruption; 7th--necrotic tumor; 8th--necrotic empowerment; 9th--necrotic termination.

Pepe pecas pica papas con un pico con un pico pepe pecas pica papas si pepe pecas pica papas con un pico donde esta el pico con que pepe pecas pica papas.
Fire walking probably isn't the best example.  Changing the fire to acid would mean laying down a thin layer of acid and certainly not the "pit" that you could fall into and take 10d6 damage from.

If asked to write-up a fire walking pit it probably is probably going to deal less then 1d6 fire damage per round and I'm most likely going to include a pretty easy save to cut that in half.  I'll also point out that due to the nature of hitpoints just because a person walks across hot coals "without taking damage" may in actuallity be taking hitpoint damage.  Remember that a 20th-level fighter with 150 hitpoints at maximum health is still fighting just as well when he is down to 1 hitpoint which may mean it is hard to see the "damage" done to the character.
 
you are the one to call that rule and is you take the damage per round of exposure then if a player is to fast maybe he can do it without take damage like a normal person that walk in the fire.



Fair enough Oma, but define "Too Fast" because yes I agree with you on that and go one further, because you can put your arm into a pot of molten steel and take it out again without being burnt if you A: make sure your arm is wet and B: go really fast.

So define "too Fast"

Swift Action? Free Action? maybe a Waterfall of acid that you duck under while running as fast as you can before jumping in a pool of water? Sure why not, but it's a house rule.

But that isn't what we are talking about is it, we are talking about, at the very least a move action to swim at one-quarter speed through the acid to the bottom, completely under, and then up to the surface and side, again swimming is at one-quarter speed to the side and pulling ourselves out bodily, all in heavy armor.

That really doesn't count as fast enough to not take damage now does it?

well the rules say that you take damage per round of exposure then if you can go in and get out before you round end this is sufficient because you going to take the damage in the same initiative count you entry to the acid

as example

if you fall in the acid you have a full round to get out until a round of exposure are done now in this case i agree that you waste your turn in fall from a trap but under the "per round of exposure" you take damage for first time at the start of your turn because one round of exposure as passed and you can do your full turn to get out until other round of Exposure was done

But if you dont waste your turn falling and you want to run in a single round for an acid waterfall maybe an acidfall non-magical in this case you can run and dont get any damage because you dont be exposure for one round.
Pepe pecas pica papas con un pico con un pico pepe pecas pica papas si pepe pecas pica papas con un pico donde esta el pico con que pepe pecas pica papas.
Except Oma, as explained already, You take damage from the Acid Instantly upon falling in, "per round" means it deals that damage "once" per round, not at the end of the round, and as I have also shown any exposure counts as a "round of exposure"

Being hit with a splash attack counts the same as a round of exposure.

You take the damage the instant you all into the acid, you can't move out fast because A: you fell in and don't get a Swim check to avoid sinking/hitting the bottom, and B:you can only move one-quarter speed while swimming, and C: you are in armor with all Your gear.

BTW, I was using a ploy to draw you out mentioning the waterfall, because it is identicle to a Black Dragon Breath Weapon as a Line of Acid, and Moving fast to avoid damage would be a Reflex Save for half (or no damage in the case of Evasion) 

You don't get a reflex save or a chance to get out fast when you fall in a pit of acid. You don't get a swim check when you hit (see falling in water) You sink under the surface. You move at one Quarter speed, Half speed as a full Round action. That means if you fall into a pit of acid and need to swim 10 feet with a move of 20 (with Full Plate armor), it will take a Full Round Action just to swim to the edge and You can't climb out until Your next turn.

And Fire Walking? Guess what, Embers aren't good at conducting heat, the outerlayer is cooler, and insulates the foot from the hot centre. Embers are embers because they hold the heat, storing it in the glowing hot core, if they conducted the heat well they would burn out in seconds.  Walking over hot coals is nothing more then a cheap trick
Slagger the Chuul, The reason it is applied at the beginning of the turn is because in 3.5 you apply damage as soon as exposure occures.

That really depends on what constitutes exposure.  For example, if the exposure is described as the result of a full round of immersion, you're really only exposed to the damage at the end of that round.
When you are splashed with acid, you take damage, it is the same thing as starting a turn in acid, at the beginning of your turn you take acid damage because you are starting that turn in acid. You are being exposed to the acid at the start of your turn, so that is when you take the damage for the second round.

So acid damage is done once per round as soon as you are exposed, which is when you initially fell in, and at the start of each turn.

That isn't really consistent with the time of initial exposure, or the "damage per round", unless you initially fell in at the beginning of your turn, which is unlikely.  Even if you were to treat the character as having a turn outside of combat (which they don't), they'd be most likely have fallen in during the middle of a move, so the next dose of damage from the acid would apply exactly 1 round later, during the equivalent move action of their "first" turn in the encounter.  As a slight aside, the moment of their first exposure would also apply 1d6 damage because they're not totally immersed when they first contact the acid.

As I said, though, time overlaps in the standard turn-based system of encounters, so dealing damage from the acid is usually made whenever it is most convenient to track, even though that's not specifically stated in the rules.

And there will be logical inconsistencies in either case; for example, taking the full damage for a round of total immersion at the start of the turn makes no sense if the character's very first action on their first turn after beating everyone else on initiative is to teleport out of the acid (either by spell or item).

I like the Rules Compendium's Concentration entry on this, since it suggests a feasible way to stage things out a bit by applying half the continuous damage upon a single action (which is the minimum generally needed to get out), or the full damage if they spend more time immersed than a single action.
It would only happen once per round, meaning in their turn and between turns if the fighter is pulled out and falls back in (2 failed climb checks, rope breaks when others try to pull him out) he won't take any additional damage from that acid, he could be dipped in multiple times but he will only take damage once during that round (at the start of exposure), until the next round where he will only take damage once, as soon as he is exposed again (and starting in the acid this is right away)

Once per round doesn't automatically mean during their turn.  For example, if the fighter was pushed in by an opponent, the damage would really occur during that opponent's turn, though convenience suggests it could be moved.

The kraken stirs. And ten billion sushi dinners cry out for vengeance. - Good Omens

Co-Author of the Dreamfane, Euralden Eye, Gajuisan Crawler, Gruesome Lurker, Fulminating Crab, Ironglass Rose, Sheengrass Swarm, Spryjack, Usunag, and Warp Drifter, and author of the Magmal Horror from Force of Nature.

My most popular campaign item; for all your adventuring convenience.
Zauber's Mutable Rod: This rod has a number of useful functions that make it easier to live in the wilderness. It is made of polished wood, with five studlike buttons on one end. Each button produces a different effect when pressed. Unless otherwise noted, the rod’s functions have no limit on the number of times they can be employed. When button 1 is pressed, one end of the rod produces a small flame, equivalent to a candle. When button 2 is pressed, the rod unfolds into a two-person tent, complete with bedrolls and warm blankets. When button 3 is pressed, the rod becomes a one-handed hammer, suitable for pounding pitons into a wall. When button 4 is pressed, the rod becomes a sturdy iron spade. When button 5 is pressed, the rod becomes a wooden bucket able to hold 2 gallons of liquid. Once per day, it can be commanded to fill with fresh water. If the rod is seriously damaged or broken in any of its alternate forms (button 2, 3, 4, or 5), it reverts to its basic rod form and cannot be activated for 24 hours. Moderate conjuration; CL 9th; Craft Rod, minor creation; Price 375 gp; Weight 2 lb.
Slagger, that would make it possible to dive in and swim through the acid in your turn without taking any damage. damage is always applied emmediately upong exposure, and the second part of the description and the Flask of Acid, instant damage, makes it clear that Exposure for part of a round from a splash attack (flask of acid 1d6 damage) counts as a round of exposure (1d6 damage per round) refer to the DMG entry under Acid
  
Per round in this context means it does damage once per round, a full round of exposure isn't needed. Damage is done at the start of that exposure and then once a round thereafter at the start of the round.

There is no mechanic in D&D to time most attacks, making a single melee attack apparently takes 3 seconds (one move and one attack) but making 5 melee attacks can be done in 6 seconds (full attack and off hand weapon) So exactly how long does an individual action take?

The point is that after doing the first damage on falling in he gets a full round, until just before the start of his next turn, before he takes a second round of damage

On your second point, it doesn't automatically occur on the their turn. If they are pushed in (over run, trip attack, etc) on someone else's turn then they won't take the next round of damage until that same turn in the next initiative. 

For example, the fighter is bullrushed into the trap by a minotaur. He won't take a second round of damage until the start of the minotaur's next turn, during the fighter's turn he takes no further damage as he is still in the first round of damage.
Slagger, that would make it possible to dive in and swim through the acid in your turn without taking any damage. damage is always applied emmediately upong exposure, and the second part of the description and the Flask of Acid, instant damage, makes it clear that Exposure for part of a round from a splash attack (flask of acid 1d6 damage) counts as a round of exposure (1d6 damage per round) refer to the DMG entry under Acid
  
Per round in this context means it does damage once per round, a full round of exposure isn't needed. Damage is done at the start of that exposure and then once a round thereafter at the start of the round.

There is no mechanic in D&D to time most attacks, making a single melee attack apparently takes 3 seconds (one move and one attack) but making 5 melee attacks can be done in 6 seconds (full attack and off hand weapon) So exactly how long does an individual action take?

That's kind of the point; there isn't actually an official statement of when the damage should be applied for that kind of ongoing damage.  In the case of a splash weapon like the acid flask, it's obvious, since the damage only has one point at which it's possible for the damage to apply since there is no lingering effect.

In this case, it's particularly relevant since we're comparing a brief initial exposure (1d6 damage per round) and total immersion (10d6 per round).  Obviously, if they character takes damage as soon as they hit the acid, it can't be for total immersion, since they aren't totally immersed at first.  That does also raise the question of what counts as total immersion, which I think will have to be left up to the DM.

The overall issue becomes complicated simply because there's a difference between the regular timing outside of encounters and the overlapping timing of turns within encounters, which makes it harder to establish exactly when that 1 round has passed relative to the initial damage from falling in.  One of the main things I hold against applying the damage at the start of the character's next turn is that it (rather counterintuitively) causes the character to suffer more if they react quickly by getting a higher initiative than if their friends outpace them and take helpful measures before their turn. 

If the damage applies partially during their actions (as the Rules Compendium indicates it might by stating that half of the continuous damage is considered to take place while you're taking actions), with its full effect achieved by the end of their turn, it provides a much more plausible representation of the effect.
On your second point, it doesn't automatically occur on the their turn. If they are pushed in (over run, trip attack, etc) on someone else's turn then they won't take the next round of damage until that same turn in the next initiative. 

For example, the fighter is bullrushed into the trap by a minotaur. He won't take a second round of damage until the start of the minotaur's next turn, during the fighter's turn he takes no further damage as he is still in the first round of damage.

The way you state it previously appeared to indicate it specifically as applying on the character's turn, regardless of the initial timing.  But since we actually appear to agree, nothing more need be said on this point.

The kraken stirs. And ten billion sushi dinners cry out for vengeance. - Good Omens

Co-Author of the Dreamfane, Euralden Eye, Gajuisan Crawler, Gruesome Lurker, Fulminating Crab, Ironglass Rose, Sheengrass Swarm, Spryjack, Usunag, and Warp Drifter, and author of the Magmal Horror from Force of Nature.

My most popular campaign item; for all your adventuring convenience.
Zauber's Mutable Rod: This rod has a number of useful functions that make it easier to live in the wilderness. It is made of polished wood, with five studlike buttons on one end. Each button produces a different effect when pressed. Unless otherwise noted, the rod’s functions have no limit on the number of times they can be employed. When button 1 is pressed, one end of the rod produces a small flame, equivalent to a candle. When button 2 is pressed, the rod unfolds into a two-person tent, complete with bedrolls and warm blankets. When button 3 is pressed, the rod becomes a one-handed hammer, suitable for pounding pitons into a wall. When button 4 is pressed, the rod becomes a sturdy iron spade. When button 5 is pressed, the rod becomes a wooden bucket able to hold 2 gallons of liquid. Once per day, it can be commanded to fill with fresh water. If the rod is seriously damaged or broken in any of its alternate forms (button 2, 3, 4, or 5), it reverts to its basic rod form and cannot be activated for 24 hours. Moderate conjuration; CL 9th; Craft Rod, minor creation; Price 375 gp; Weight 2 lb.
Slagger, total Immersion is self evident, one is under water or mostly underwater, and the rules for falling also make this clear, also the description of being in a large vat of Acid makes it clear that neck deep (swiming) would count as total immersion. Or being soaked head to toe (a vat is dumped on a character.)

As for how long it takes to be fully immersed, the fall rules make this clear that this would occur on the action that they fell into the acid, ie walking and falling into the pit, so it would be resolved as part of the move action. Falling rules make it clear.

Most importantly, Damage is taken on the onset of exposure because this prevents exploits, if it was taken at the end of movement then you could freely move through dangerous invironmental hazards, like walking through fire, or swimming through a pool of acid, and take no damage.

Again, does it make any sense if I could dive in and swim across a pool of acid and get out at the other side and take no damage at all, but if someone splashes me with a flask of that same acid I take damage?  

As for how long does it take to be immersed? The same length of time it takes to fall, I think it is again self evident that if I jump into a pool, then I am immersed in that same move action. 

How long must one be exposed, the DMG also makes this clear that any exposure, and gives some examples, such as a Flask of acid, a monster's spittle, that short exposure counts as a round of exposure.

ie a 1d6 flask of acid standard action deal same damage as a full round of exposure of 1d6 per round acid.

And really it is always at the start, not at the end. Imagine if a spell gave you a bonus, like +1 attack, or +1 Save or 5 temp Hp for a round, if you only got the buff at the end of the round for a micro-second, it's always applied at the start. Otherwise they would use very specific language, such as (1d6 damage at the end of each round) In the cases where the effect happens at the end of a turn, it is clearly stated as such.

Taking damage at the onset of exposure, and the start of a turn is the only way to be consistant and non-exploitive.
  
Slagger, total Immersion is self evident, one is under water or mostly underwater, and the rules for falling also make this clear, also the description of being in a large vat of Acid makes it clear that neck deep (swiming) would count as total immersion. Or being soaked head to toe (a vat is dumped on a character.)

As for how long it takes to be fully immersed, the fall rules make this clear that this would occur on the action that they fell into the acid, ie walking and falling into the pit, so it would be resolved as part of the move action. Falling rules make it clear.

I would have to disagree that the falling rules indicate either one of those.

While you could certainly claim that you become fully immersed during the action that you enter the acid on the basis that a certain amount of water slows a fall, that is neither the first instant of exposure (which obviously occurs the very moment contact takes place), nor is it consistent with taking the damage at the start of a turn since, by definition, actions occur after the start of your turn.  That's a much better fit with the Rules Compendium's description of taking half the amount of continuous damage during a particular action.

Most importantly, Damage is taken on the onset of exposure because this prevents exploits, if it was taken at the end of movement then you could freely move through dangerous invironmental hazards, like walking through fire, or swimming through a pool of acid, and take no damage.

Again, does it make any sense if I could dive in and swim across a pool of acid and get out at the other side and take no damage at all, but if someone splashes me with a flask of that same acid I take damage?  

As for how long does it take to be immersed? The same length of time it takes to fall, I think it is again self evident that if I jump into a pool, then I am immersed in that same move action.

That's not really true; the speed of entering the pool varies depending on how far you dove to enter it.  As the most basic of falling rules show us, you're moving faster (and take more damage) the further you fall, up to a certain maximum, and a person tumbling into a pool at their very feet is clearly not entering as quickly as someone diving from 200 feet above.

As for the exposure being exploited, I would again turn to the Rules Compendium; the half exposure during a particular action is both a sensible compromise and compatible with the undefined application time of the damage.  If you've falling in with a single action, that's good for 5d6 of your 10d6 for total immersion (or just a flat half of the rolled result); if you've got the time for a second action, that would be long enough for the rest of the damage, which represents a very reasonable match between the time spent in the hazard and the available actions that could be used to escape it.

How long must one be exposed, the DMG also makes this clear that any exposure, and gives some examples, such as a Flask of acid, a monster's spittle, that short exposure counts as a round of exposure.

ie a 1d6 flask of acid standard action deal same damage as a full round of exposure of 1d6 per round acid.

The difference you have there is between immediate and continuous damage, as well as absolute and partial exposure.  Immersion in the acid tank differs both in that it applies over a period of time rather than being effectively instant, and in the degree of exposure (which similarly has two levels, and one of them arbitrary, rather than being a set amount).
And really it is always at the start, not at the end. Imagine if a spell gave you a bonus, like +1 attack, or +1 Save or 5 temp Hp for a round, if you only got the buff at the end of the round for a micro-second, it's always applied at the start. Otherwise they would use very specific language, such as (1d6 damage at the end of each round) In the cases where the effect happens at the end of a turn, it is clearly stated as such.

Taking damage at the onset of exposure, and the start of a turn is the only way to be consistant and non-exploitive.

The spell would be a bad example, since it's typically applied by a caster, who uses an action and grants the benefit at the end of that action (when the casting is complete).  It's almost never at the start of a turn unless the spell had a casting time of at least 1 full round (which is not true for the vast majority of spells).  For most spells, the duration will last from somewhere in the middle of the caster's turn until a later round at exactly the same point during their turn.  It's a significantly different circumstance to the one we're addressing, in which (we might assume) the initial effect is applied somewhere during the turn of the character who fell into the acid.

While it might seem exploitative, it really isn't if you're immediately applying full damage for them entering the acid (especially for total immersion), since they already suffer a full dose of damage before ever having the chance to respond.  There are certainly arguments to be made about how much damage they should initially take, but I'm not claiming that anyone should take a dip in acid and come up unharmed.

Constantly applying the damage at the start of the victim's turn also still runs into the illogical problems of initiative, where other characters can potentially save the victim before they suffer further harm.  If you think it's unreasonable for the victim to avoid harm (other than the initial exposure, of course) by escaping on their own turn, is it really more reasonable to allow their allies to save them in exactly the same way simply because they weren't quick enough to reach their own turn?  All that really means is that it makes sense for your resident trap-springer to have a low initiative so that they don't get hurt too quickly.

The kraken stirs. And ten billion sushi dinners cry out for vengeance. - Good Omens

Co-Author of the Dreamfane, Euralden Eye, Gajuisan Crawler, Gruesome Lurker, Fulminating Crab, Ironglass Rose, Sheengrass Swarm, Spryjack, Usunag, and Warp Drifter, and author of the Magmal Horror from Force of Nature.

My most popular campaign item; for all your adventuring convenience.
Zauber's Mutable Rod: This rod has a number of useful functions that make it easier to live in the wilderness. It is made of polished wood, with five studlike buttons on one end. Each button produces a different effect when pressed. Unless otherwise noted, the rod’s functions have no limit on the number of times they can be employed. When button 1 is pressed, one end of the rod produces a small flame, equivalent to a candle. When button 2 is pressed, the rod unfolds into a two-person tent, complete with bedrolls and warm blankets. When button 3 is pressed, the rod becomes a one-handed hammer, suitable for pounding pitons into a wall. When button 4 is pressed, the rod becomes a sturdy iron spade. When button 5 is pressed, the rod becomes a wooden bucket able to hold 2 gallons of liquid. Once per day, it can be commanded to fill with fresh water. If the rod is seriously damaged or broken in any of its alternate forms (button 2, 3, 4, or 5), it reverts to its basic rod form and cannot be activated for 24 hours. Moderate conjuration; CL 9th; Craft Rod, minor creation; Price 375 gp; Weight 2 lb.
I read this and about was saying Slagger_the_Chuulmaybe maybe you take 1d6 of damage the first turn (when falling) then you take 5d6 at the start of yout turn and if you done your turn still in the pool of acid you take other 5d6 then if a player try to swim in a pool of acid ina  single turn he take only 5 d 6 (because are doing in her own turn) whit this the trap can work as normal in a encounter and in local movement.
Pepe pecas pica papas con un pico con un pico pepe pecas pica papas si pepe pecas pica papas con un pico donde esta el pico con que pepe pecas pica papas.
Slagger, that ruleset in the compendium was refering to what exactly? Being interupted during spell casting from continuous damage?

Either way it amounts to the same thing: They take Acid damage on the turn that the fell into the acid pit, they take acid damage on the following turn for still being in the acid.

-Round one, Move, fall into acid trap and take damage.

It really doesn't matter if you make the damage roll right away or after their swim check, they take damage for this round and end their turn in the acid.

-Round 2, Start in acid, take damage,

On round 2 regardless of if they take an action or not, they will take the damage from being in the acid.

I don't want to nitpick, but it isn't consistant to take damage after you pull yorself out of the acid. Thats like taking damage for leaving the acid rather then for being in the acid. It makes even less sense if that damage kills them, because if the acid killed them, then how did they climb out? Consistancy says I resolve the damage while they are in the acid and not a round after they are out of it.

Sure they dive into a pool of acid and swim across, do the damage first, do the damage after they swam across, but do the damage while they are still in the acid. Don't have them hop out the other side with no damage.
Slagger, that ruleset in the compendium was refering to what exactly? Being interupted during spell casting from continuous damage?

Either way it amounts to the same thing: They take Acid damage on the turn that the fell into the acid pit, they take acid damage on the following turn for still being in the acid.

-Round one, Move, fall into acid trap and take damage.

It really doesn't matter if you make the damage roll right away or after their swim check, they take damage for this round and end their turn in the acid.

-Round 2, Start in acid, take damage,

On round 2 regardless of if they take an action or not, they will take the damage from being in the acid.

I don't want to nitpick, but it isn't consistant to take damage after you pull yorself out of the acid. Thats like taking damage for leaving the acid rather then for being in the acid. It makes even less sense if that damage kills them, because if the acid killed them, then how did they climb out? Consistancy says I resolve the damage while they are in the acid and not a round after they are out of it.

Sure they dive into a pool of acid and swim across, do the damage first, do the damage after they swam across, but do the damage while they are still in the acid. Don't have them hop out the other side with no damage.

Sorry but again if you want to read literally you only take damage PER ROUND of exposure then you dont take automatic damage, the update of the rules of the RC say that the acid splash is no longer a ACID effect is an Throwing Splashing Weapon and work like a weapon with the extra rules of Splashing then if you fall in a pool of mundane acid you only take damage if you take a Round of Exposure and what is a Round

round

A 6-second unit of game time used to manage combat. Every combatant may take at least one action every round.



6 Seconds IN COMBAT

the if you fall out of initiative you dont take damage you roll initiative and the in your turn you don't take damage because you not was stay in the Acid for 6 Seconds then if you go out you dont take any damage and in the Next ROUND you take Acid Damage at the Start Of your turn.


Take 1d6 first then 5d6 at the start of your turn and then if you done the turn in the acid take other 5d6 is more balanced that the literally rules.
Pepe pecas pica papas con un pico con un pico pepe pecas pica papas si pepe pecas pica papas con un pico donde esta el pico con que pepe pecas pica papas.
Oma, The Rules Compendium doesn't contain the list of weapons, armor and equipement from the PHB, The Acid (Flask) is in the PHB and deald 1d6 Acid damage, it is a mundane item.

Acid is "energy" damage, which is explained under the Energy section of the RC, that section says Acid does 1d6 Damage per round

So an attack from an Acid Flask (1d6 acid damage) is equal to a round of exposure to acid (1d6 per round)

The Rules Compendium doesn't remove any gear or items from the PHB.

As for the 6 seconds. again Read the rules on how a Round is measured. From the start of one turn until just before the start of the next turn in the same initiative order.

Also The Damage from falling is settled on the turn in which the damage was done. Seriously, stop being so dence, Initiative is the start of a New Round. The Damage from falling into the pit would be settled outside of initiative before you start a new round.
Oma, The Rules Compendium doesn't contain the list of weapons, armor and equipement from the PHB, The Acid (Flask) is in the PHB and deald 1d6 Acid damage, it is a mundane item.

Acid is "energy" damage, which is explained under the Energy section of the RC, that section says Acid does 1d6 Damage per round

So an attack from an Acid Flask (1d6 acid damage) is equal to a round of exposure to acid (1d6 per round)

The Rules Compendium doesn't remove any gear or items from the PHB.

As for the 6 seconds. again Read the rules on how a Round is measured. From the start of one turn until just before the start of the next turn in the same initiative order.

Also The Damage from falling is settled on the turn in which the damage was done. Seriously, stop being so dence, Initiative is the start of a New Round. The Damage from falling into the pit would be settled outside of initiative before you start a new round.

sorry but come in the section of Trhowing Splashing Weapon you can find that items in Player Handbook and the Rules of how work in RC

and the RC only say this

Acid Effects
Corrosive acid deals 1d6 points of damage per round of exposure. Total immersion in acid deals 10d6 points of damage per round.

Yes the RC don't remove gear only is a Update of the Rules of how to use because now the Acid Flask or the monster acid attack not are a Adic Effect are only an Acid attack or a Throwing Splashing Weapon

I read and i told you again the Round are for Combat then you Start the Round until you roll initiatives the acid damage of the Pool not are instant and you dont take damage for Falling you take damage under the rule of Acid Effect and it say "per round of exposure".
Pepe pecas pica papas con un pico con un pico pepe pecas pica papas si pepe pecas pica papas con un pico donde esta el pico con que pepe pecas pica papas.
Oma, an Acid (flask) deals 1d6 Acid Damage

The Rules Compendium does not change that at all. There is no "Acid Attack" entry in the Rules Compendium.

And are you saying that Protection from Energy:Acid doesn't protect you from the damage of an Acid (flask)?


You are literally making rules up. 
Oma, an Acid (flask) deals 1d6 Acid Damage

The Rules Compendium does not change that at all. There is no "Acid Attack" entry in the Rules Compendium.

And are you saying that Protection from Energy:Acid doesn't protect you from the damage of an Acid (flask)?


You are literally making rules up. 

yes are acid damage like a magic missile do force damage the only change from the RC is that the Acid from a flask and from monster attack are no longer acid effects


Protection from energy grants temporary immunity to the type of energy you specify when you cast it (acid, cold, electricity, fire, or sonic). When the spell absorbs 12 points per caster level of energy damage (to a maximum of 120 points at 10th level), it is discharged.


Note: Protection from energy overlaps (and does not stack with) resist energy. If a character is warded by protection from energy and resist energy, the protection spell absorbs damage until its power is exhausted.



Then Acid is a Energy and you can Absorbs Acid damage.
Pepe pecas pica papas con un pico con un pico pepe pecas pica papas si pepe pecas pica papas con un pico donde esta el pico con que pepe pecas pica papas.
Yes Oma and the flask of mundane acid does 1d6 Acid Energy damage, tha counts as a round of exposure, because a round of exposure to acid does 1d6 per round.

Notice how the flask does the same damage as a round of exposure? 

That pit of 10d6 Acid damage? Take a glass flask, dip it in. You now have an Acid (flask) that deals 1d6 Damage.

So being hit with a flask of Acid (instant effect) counts as a round of exposure to acid. QED     
Yes Oma and the flask of mundane acid does 1d6 Acid Energy damage, tha counts as a round of exposure, because a round of exposure to acid does 1d6 per round.

Notice how the flask does the same damage as a round of exposure? 

That pit of 10d6 Acid damage? Take a glass flask, dip it in. You now have an Acid (flask) that deals 1d6 Damage.

So being hit with a flask of Acid (instant effect) counts as a round of exposure to acid. QED     

sorry again under the rules this don't longer happen now are like any other attack and damage but with the Acid energy type.

Sorry the rules are the rules and work depending on the situation.

Again under the rule you take damage as any other kind of damage from attacks from weapons and from an acid effect you take damage as described per round of exposure not as an attack.
Pepe pecas pica papas con un pico con un pico pepe pecas pica papas si pepe pecas pica papas con un pico donde esta el pico con que pepe pecas pica papas.
What rule Oma, What Rule?

Quote the rule that states that Acid (flask) no longer deals Acid damage? 
What rule Oma, What Rule?

Quote the rule that states that Acid (flask) no longer deals Acid damage? 

the rule that states that Acid (flask) is not longer an Acid effect, that work in other way that a standard attack.
Pepe pecas pica papas con un pico con un pico pepe pecas pica papas si pepe pecas pica papas con un pico donde esta el pico con que pepe pecas pica papas.
Oh Ok, now could you quote that rule, because I don't seem to be able to find it in my copy of  the Rules Compendium.
And what type of damage does an Acid (flask) do now? it is attack damage? not sure how attack damage works. Is it Attack Energy? Can I cast Protection from Energy: Attack now?
Oh Ok, now could you quote that rule, because I don't seem to be able to find it in my copy of  the Rules Compendium.

OLD Entry


ACID EFFECTS

Corrosive acids deals 1d6 points of damage per round of exposure except in the case of total immersion (such as into a vat of acid), which deals 10d6 points of damage per round. An attack with acid, such as from a hurled vial or a monster’s spittle, counts as a round of exposure.


The fumes from most acids are inhaled poisons. Those who come close enough to a large body of acid to dunk a creature in it must make a DC 13 Fortitude save or take 1 point of Constitution damage. All such characters must make a second save 1 minute later or take another 1d4 points of Constitution damage.


Creatures immune to acid’s caustic properties might still drown in it if they are totally immersed (see Drowning).




New Entry

Acid Effects

Corrosive acid deals 1d6 points of damage per round of exposure. Total immersion in acid deals 10d6 points of damage per round.
The fumes from most acids are inhaled poisons. Those who come close enough to a large body of acid to dunk a creature in it are exposed to the fumes.
Such creatures must succeed on a DC 13 Fortitude save or take 1 point of Constitution damage.
If the first save fails, the creature must succeed on a second save 1 minute later or take another 1d4 points of Constitution damage.
Creatures immune to acid might still drown in it (see Suffocation, page 141) if they’re totally immersed.


Under the Rules Of 3.5 an acid attack is no longer a Acid Affect.
Pepe pecas pica papas con un pico con un pico pepe pecas pica papas si pepe pecas pica papas con un pico donde esta el pico con que pepe pecas pica papas.
OK, Oma, I don't see where it mentions Acid (flask) in that new entry, so I assume the Acid (flask) in the PHB works the same as before.

It says in the entry:

"Corrosive acid deals 1d6 points of damage per round of exposure"

It says under Acid (flask) in the PHB:

Acid

You can throw a flask of acid...A direct hit deals 1d6 points of acid damage.




So it is Acid, a flask of acid, which is described in the RC as you quoted, it deals 1d6 Acid Damage, which is Acid Energy as described in the RC, and it deals one round's worth of acid damage, 1d6 as described in the RC, as a melee touch attack
     

So when it calls it a flask of acid, are you saying that the RC has a rule saying it is no longer a flask of acid? it's a flash of Oma Bull now? That does 1d6 Oma Damage? 
OK, Oma, I don't see where it mentions Acid (flask) in that new entry, so I assume the Acid (flask) in the PHB works the same as before.

It says in the entry:

"Corrosive acid deals 1d6 points of damage per round of exposure"

It says under Acid (flask) in the PHB:

Acid

You can throw a flask of acid...A direct hit deals 1d6 points of acid damage.




So it is Acid, a flask of acid, which is described in the RC as you quoted, it deals 1d6 Acid Damage, which is Acid Energy as described in the RC, and it deals one round's worth of acid damage, 1d6 as described in the RC, as a melee touch attack
     

So when it calls it a flask of acid, are you saying that the RC has a rule saying it is no longer a flask of acid? it's a flash of Oma Bull now? That does 1d6 Oma Damage? 

Updated rules of Throwing Spashing Weapons and the standards definitions you have it a Acid Flask dont do damage per round of exposure it deal damage as a weapon.

MAKING A THROW
To attack with a splash weapon, make a ranged touch attack against the target. Thrown weapons require no weapon profi ciency, so you never take a –4 nonprofi ciency penalty. A hit deals DIRECT hit damage to the target and splash damage to all creatures within 5 feet of that target.
You can instead target a specifi c grid intersection, unless that intersection is part of a Large or larger creature’s space— in that case, you’re aiming at the creature.
If you can aim at the chosen grid intersection, make a ranged attack against AC 5. Creatures in all squares adjacent to the grid intersection are dealt the splash damage if you hit. Direct hit damage isn’t dealt to any creature.

Spashing Weapons

A ranged weapon that splashes on impact, dealing damage to creatures who are within 5 feet of the spot where it lands as well as to targets it actually hits. Attacks with splash weapons are ranged touch attacks.

Acid: You can throw a flask of acid as a splash WEAPON. Treat this attack as a ranged touch attack with a range increment of 10 feet. A direct hit deals 1d6 points of acid damage. Every creature within 5 feet of the point where the acid hits takes 1 point of acid damage from the splash.
Pepe pecas pica papas con un pico con un pico pepe pecas pica papas si pepe pecas pica papas con un pico donde esta el pico con que pepe pecas pica papas.
Those are the same as the old rules Oma, but I noticed you forgot to quote this part of it:

A splash weapon is a ranged weapon that breaks on impact, splashing or scattering its contents over its target as well as nearby creatures or objects. Most splash weapons consist of liquids, such as acid or holy water, in breakable vials


 
Now why would you leave that part out Oma?

Acid:
You can throw a flask of acid as a splash WEAPON. Treat this attack as a ranged touch attack with a range increment of 10 feet. A direct hit deals 1d6 points of acid damage. Every creature within 5 feet of the point where the acid hits takes 1 point of acid damage from the splash.



What is  in the flask?

Acid, see the entry under Acid Effects: "Corrosive acids deals 1d6 points of damage per round of exposure"

What happens when you throw a flask of acid at a target? it "splashes on impact" "splashing it's contents on the target"

So it deals it's damage by splashing Acid (see Acid Effects, 1d6 damage) on the target as a ranged touch attack, resolved instantly. So an attack with Acid counts as a round of exposure and deals 1d6 of damage.

If I took a flask and filled it with the acid from the pit of Acidd 10d6 damage, I would have an Acid Flask, 1d6 Acid effect, that works as above. And a Ranged Touch attack with it would count as a round of exposure. QED
        
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sorry but nop, are a type of energy damage like cold damage, fire damage, electricity damage, sonic damage and work like that as a type of damage, now the Acid effect are for other things like the environment

A Acid Flask is a Throwing Splashing Weapon that deal Acid damage and don't have to do with the Acid Effect Rule that have poison and drowning effects.

Again under the rules the Acid Flask is a Throwing Splashing Weapon and work like that

But if you can add the Acid Flask in the Acid effect like the last version well you can do it as a house rule.
Pepe pecas pica papas con un pico con un pico pepe pecas pica papas si pepe pecas pica papas con un pico donde esta el pico con que pepe pecas pica papas.
Oma, the rules for Acid Effect, that you quoted from the RC, is under the entry Energy.


Under the Damage types it stats

DAMAGE TYPES:
Energy:
Abilities and effects that employ one of the five energy types deal energy damage, which can be acid, cold, electricity, fire, or sonic.
  
So the Damage from the Flask of Acid is Energy

Under Energy in the Rules Compendium it states:

ENERGY:
Acid Effect:
Corrosive acid deals 1d6 points of damage per round of exposure

Again, walk up to this pit of 10d6 acid and fill a flask with it, and you have an Acid (flask) that deals a 1d6 acid effect as a ranged touch attack that counts as a round of exposure. QED

Yes but as described in Acid Effect the acid Flask are not longer under the rules of Acid Effects because are under the rules of Throwing Splashing Weapons that work in other form.
Pepe pecas pica papas con un pico con un pico pepe pecas pica papas si pepe pecas pica papas con un pico donde esta el pico con que pepe pecas pica papas.
No one ever said that exposure to a flask of acid's splash area would inflict any of the side effects of acid...especially since it's only a small amount (maybe 10 centilitres).
Slagger, that ruleset in the compendium was refering to what exactly? Being interupted during spell casting from continuous damage?

It's more useful that it establishes half of the continous damage as being applied during a particular action, which (for once) tells us more about when the damage is being applied.

There's no doubt that full immersion in acid for one round deals 10d6 points of acid damage, it's just about when the damage should apply since it's not a single immediate effect like a single flask of acid.  The Rules Compendium's reference while talking about Concentration and spells gives us a hint that is otherwise absent.

Either way it amounts to the same thing: They take Acid damage on the turn that the fell into the acid pit, they take acid damage on the following turn for still being in the acid.

I don't want to nitpick, but it isn't consistant to take damage after you pull yorself out of the acid. Thats like taking damage for leaving the acid rather then for being in the acid. It makes even less sense if that damage kills them, because if the acid killed them, then how did they climb out? Consistancy says I resolve the damage while they are in the acid and not a round after they are out of it.

Of course, but what they'd take damage for is the initial exposure, however much damage that should be (whether or not you achieve full immersion as your first exposure is really a separate question to when the later damage from immersion should apply), and each potential action thereafter towards the full 10d6 per round.  The Rules Compendium indicates that you could be taking half of that continuous damage per action, potentially allowing you to escape with only half damage if you manage to do it with your first action.
Sure they dive into a pool of acid and swim across, do the damage first, do the damage after they swam across, but do the damage while they are still in the acid. Don't have them hop out the other side with no damage.

This wouldn't occur after you'd left the acid, but while you're taking each action, since that's how the Rules Compendium describes it.  As the text states: "If you’re taking continuous damage, such as from a Melf’s acid arrow spell, half the damage is considered to take place while you’re taking your actions."

Since it does say "actions" rather than just "action", you could argue for just half of the damage applied across all actions, though even that wouldn't be completely unreasonable as a possibility if you're escaping before the end of your turn.

At no point, however, should you be dipping into the acid and escaping without harm, whether your Xd6 is a partial dip for 1d6 or full immersion for 10d6.  You get your Xd6 from initial exposure, at least half the Xd6 if you take one or more actions (or the equivalent if you can't take actions) within the acid, and obviously the full Xd6 if you're still in the acid at the end of your turn.  You might also have received the full Xd6 if you've taken more than one action while within the acid, though I'd leave the adjudication up to the DM.  For example, escaping with a single standard action or move action might only warrant applying the half damage, but escaping with a full-round action would probably be better with 10d6 damage.

The kraken stirs. And ten billion sushi dinners cry out for vengeance. - Good Omens

Co-Author of the Dreamfane, Euralden Eye, Gajuisan Crawler, Gruesome Lurker, Fulminating Crab, Ironglass Rose, Sheengrass Swarm, Spryjack, Usunag, and Warp Drifter, and author of the Magmal Horror from Force of Nature.

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It's more useful that it establishes half of the continous damage as being applied during a particular action, which (for once) tells us more about when the damage is being applied.



But  the "half Damage" isn't taken at that point, the caster has taken the full damage all ready, half of that damage is "considered" to effect the concentration check. The only way to determine what half the damage is to have already rolled the full damage.

there is also no mention of taking the second half of the damage later, which there would be. So the damge is front loaded in this case, half of which is used for the concentration check DC. 

In short I would not roll 5d6 at the halfway point. I would have rolled 10d6 already and applied damage. If I rolled 40, the wizard take damage and would roll a concentration check later against 20 damage. So this rule, if anything, shows that the damage has already been dealt.

It also says that if that was the last of the damage, then he doesn't have to make a concentration check as he is no longer effected. So with Acid Arrow (damage per round and asuming he stepped on a trap so is hit on his turn) he will take the damage at the beginning of the final round and then be uneffected for the remainder of the round.

And then there is the issue of if the second half the damage kills you, in which case the game would need very specific rules about which actions it interupts. The complete lack of rules here indicates the damage is front loaded.

Either way it amounts to the same thing: They take Acid damage on the turn that the fell into the acid pit, they take acid damage on the following turn for still being in the acid.

That was the main point I was aiming at, the damage would be taken twice either way.

This wouldn't occur after you'd left the acid, but while you're taking each action, since that's how the Rules Compendium describes it.  As the text states: "If you’re taking continuous damage, such as from a Melf’s acid arrow spell, half the damage is considered to take place while you’re taking your actions."



The word here is "considered" and it is applied specifically for what the Concentration DC would be. I am fine with giving a leeway, because I personaly dislike using instant kill traps. This would work for other things, but only if the Character would have survived the full damage.

If they wouldn't survive the full damage, then at what point are they killed by it? I do admit the drama of pulling oneself halfway out, gasping, before expiring and falling back in dead. But in functionality you are creating all sorts of issues. If this would have knocked the fighter below 0 hp (but he is still alive) where/when would he have passed out?

I think it is clear that the considered half damage here assumes that the caster making the concentration check survived the full damage, so the question of "when did he take the damage" is moot if he will survive it.
Oma, the Acid Flask is under the rules for Acid.

Mundane acid Acid deals 1d6 damage per round. The acid in the acid flask, is simply mundane acid. It's the same acid that is in your trap.

The rules for Throwing Splash Weapons is the same as before, it covers how the target is hit with the acid, not the damage type. A Throwing Splash Weapon doesn't do damage like Piercing, Blunt, etc. It does the damage of the effect of the splash, as is specified in the Throwing Splash Weapons rules:

"A splash weapon is a ranged weapon that breaks on impact, splashing or scattering its contents over its target as well as nearby creatures or objects. Most splash weapons consist of liquids, such as acid or holy water, in breakable vials"

At this point You are going to claim that a +2 Flaming Sword +1d6 Fire Damage, doesn't do a fire effect.   

  
Throwing Splash Weapons, is not a "damage type" a flask of Acid deals 1d6 Acid damage. which is found under the Damage Types entry of the RC, which refers to Energy.

 It is a flask of the same mundane acid that is in the trap.
But  the "half Damage" isn't taken at that point, the caster has taken the full damage all ready, half of that damage is "considered" to effect the concentration check. The only way to determine what half the damage is to have already rolled the full damage.

It's true that the only way to determine half damage is to have rolled full damage, but rolling it isn't the same as applying it if you've got a reason to spread out the effect (as we do in the case of continuous damage) and the potential for not all of that damage to apply. 
there is also no mention of taking the second half of the damage later, which there would be. So the damge is front loaded in this case, half of which is used for the concentration check DC.

There doesn't have to be a later statement for the second half if there's a way to take it, or it's valid to avoid it, since it's the representation of 1 round of exposure to the acid.  If you end up suffering the rest, you suffer it, if not, you avoid it in the same manner as someone making a Reflex save for half damage (the other half of the damage simply doesn't apply in that case).
In short I would not roll 5d6 at the halfway point. I would have rolled 10d6 already and applied damage. If I rolled 40, the wizard take damage and would roll a concentration check later against 20 damage. So this rule, if anything, shows that the damage has already been dealt.

It shows that the damage has been rolled, not that it has been dealt.  I agree, however, that it would be most appropriate to roll 10d6 and halve it, rather than rolling 5d6.
It also says that if that was the last of the damage, then he doesn't have to make a concentration check as he is no longer effected. So with Acid Arrow (damage per round and asuming he stepped on a trap so is hit on his turn) he will take the damage at the beginning of the final round and then be uneffected for the remainder of the round.

That's depends on the assumption that he's already taken the last amount of damage, and he wouldn't be taking the damage at the start of his turn if he was hit during his turn (which is after the start of the turn) since that wouldn't be a round later.  It would also be rather hard to determine in this case:

Consider, for example, if the character is trying to cast a spell to teleport out of the acid pit.  If they have taken the last dose of acid damage, they won't need a Concentration check and (assuming they can handle any other problems, like verbal components) will teleport freely out as they cast the spell.  But if they fail the Concentration check to cast the spell because they're still being continuously damaged by acid, they would fail to teleport out and it obviously wouldn't be the last amount of damage they would take.

That's kind of a problem with trying to always apply the damage at the start of their turn, since you don't know if it will be the last application of damage until you're resolving it.

And then there is the issue of if the second half the damage kills you, in which case the game would need very specific rules about which actions it interupts. The complete lack of rules here indicates the damage is front loaded.

I don't really see the problem there.  If the damage occurs during the action, it will interrupt that action.  If the damage that kills the character occurs during a later action it instead interrupts that later action.  It doesn't indicate front loading at all, nor do we have any rules basis for assuming that damage occurs at the start of a turn by default (so we can't assume it in the complete absence of more specific rules).

The word here is "considered" and it is applied specifically for what the Concentration DC would be. I am fine with giving a leeway, because I personaly dislike using instant kill traps. This would work for other things, but only if the Character would have survived the full damage.

If they wouldn't survive the full damage, then at what point are they killed by it? I do admit the drama of pulling oneself halfway out, gasping, before expiring and falling back in dead. But in functionality you are creating all sorts of issues. If this would have knocked the fighter below 0 hp (but he is still alive) where/when would he have passed out?

It breaks down fairly simply; they take half of the damage during their first action, and the other half during their second action.  If they escape the acid before taking the second action, they've avoided half of the damage that they would normally suffer for spending a round immersed in acid.
I think it is clear that the considered half damage here assumes that the caster making the concentration check survived the full damage, so the question of "when did he take the damage" is moot if he will survive it.

That is sort of true, but we're talking about a representation of continuous damage, so our answer to when he took the previous damage is "during the previous period of time" (usually a round).  The exact timing of that period is variable, however, since that last dose of damage may have started at any given time and proceeded to any given time.

Obviously, the character will have survived any damage they've already taken, but it's interesting to see the wording they've used, since they've actually stated it as damage dealt, rather than damage taken (the former being what is applied against you, and the latter being the amount you actually suffer after effects that can reduce it).  So while the DC is being set by the amount of continous damage that the acid has dealt, only half of the damage they actually take from that is suffered during their action(s).

It would be entirely consistent with the official use of both the "deal damage" and "take damage" terms for you to initially determine the full continuous damage dealt, but have the amount of that damage which the character actually takes spread out (and thus potentially reduced if they escape the effect quickly) through the subsequent round.

The kraken stirs. And ten billion sushi dinners cry out for vengeance. - Good Omens

Co-Author of the Dreamfane, Euralden Eye, Gajuisan Crawler, Gruesome Lurker, Fulminating Crab, Ironglass Rose, Sheengrass Swarm, Spryjack, Usunag, and Warp Drifter, and author of the Magmal Horror from Force of Nature.

My most popular campaign item; for all your adventuring convenience.
Zauber's Mutable Rod: This rod has a number of useful functions that make it easier to live in the wilderness. It is made of polished wood, with five studlike buttons on one end. Each button produces a different effect when pressed. Unless otherwise noted, the rod’s functions have no limit on the number of times they can be employed. When button 1 is pressed, one end of the rod produces a small flame, equivalent to a candle. When button 2 is pressed, the rod unfolds into a two-person tent, complete with bedrolls and warm blankets. When button 3 is pressed, the rod becomes a one-handed hammer, suitable for pounding pitons into a wall. When button 4 is pressed, the rod becomes a sturdy iron spade. When button 5 is pressed, the rod becomes a wooden bucket able to hold 2 gallons of liquid. Once per day, it can be commanded to fill with fresh water. If the rod is seriously damaged or broken in any of its alternate forms (button 2, 3, 4, or 5), it reverts to its basic rod form and cannot be activated for 24 hours. Moderate conjuration; CL 9th; Craft Rod, minor creation; Price 375 gp; Weight 2 lb.