Sage Atop The Mountain: Your Trap Issues Solved

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Just putting up another thread where I will readily help people resolve, to the best of my ability, issues they might be having in their game. Hopefully the thread can even act as a resource for others to peruse at their leisure.

As implied by the name, the topic of this thread is about traps. These can be traps of any kind that can exist in a game. I have been using traps in D&D for quite a while and have played with DMs that used traps quite well. I have a good grasp on them.

Just keep in mind, when I give an answer for how best to resolve something, for the sake of brevity, I might not necessarily include "why" it's the best way to resolve it. If you want to know, however, I'll be glad to give you the reasoning behind it.

Also this thread is not intended to be a trap generator so please don't ask me for trap ideas. I can point you in the direction of some good trap/trick websites and such, but me coming up with trap after trap is not within the scope of this threads intent.

Having a problem presenting a trap? Not sure how best to adjudicate one? Stuff like that I can gladly help with.

So...come at me, bro.

I'm on a journey of enlightenment, learning and self-improvement. A journey towards mastery. A journey that will never end. If you challenge me, prepare to be challenged. If you have something to offer as a fellow student, I will accept it. If you call yourself a master, prepare to be humbled. If you seek me, look to the path. I will be traveling it.

 

Proudly playing in many wrong ways. I'm not afraid of playing wrong according to the rules. Why are you?

 

100 Crack Reply of the Yagamifire. You are already wrong.

...Why did this need a second topic?
...Why did this need a second topic?



It had a first?

Seriously, I PRAY TO GOD, that this isn't a case of someone not reading something I wrote and putting a message with negative connotations based on their lack of reading in the very first reply on a thread. I pray that that is not the case even if it would be par for the course around here.

I'm on a journey of enlightenment, learning and self-improvement. A journey towards mastery. A journey that will never end. If you challenge me, prepare to be challenged. If you have something to offer as a fellow student, I will accept it. If you call yourself a master, prepare to be humbled. If you seek me, look to the path. I will be traveling it.

 

Proudly playing in many wrong ways. I'm not afraid of playing wrong according to the rules. Why are you?

 

100 Crack Reply of the Yagamifire. You are already wrong.

...Why did this need a second topic?



I haven't seen any trap threads even a coulpe pages back. I personally don't have any pressing trap issues but since there doesn't seem to be any place to discuss traps that is currently active, this thread seems like a good idea.
Are there traps on the path up the mountaintop on which the sage resides?

More seriously, I've been toying with the idea of some sort of creature which tries to trap adventurers by presenting what looks like a cave or chest full of treasure, then snapping shut when they get inside. Kind of like a venus fly trap. Any thoughts about effectively implementing such an idea?
I did a trap encounter a while back which went something like this:

The PCs enter a long corridor.  Some skeletons near the beginning of it give the hint that there are traps.  The rogue finds and disarms/avoids the first trap.  The rogue finds a second trap after passing the first one, and is in the process of determining what to do, when a monster who has been chasing the PCs for quite some time (and is way over their level), rounds the corner behind them.  Effectively, they now have a time limit to traverse the trapped corridor and escape the rampaging monster.

The encounter seemed brilliant in my head, but it played out very stale.  I think it was mostly due to which traps I used: some more creative traps may have made the encounter more dynamic.  Any suggestions on how to more effectively implement this?
Are there traps on the path up the mountaintop on which the sage resides?

More seriously, I've been toying with the idea of some sort of creature which tries to trap adventurers by presenting what looks like a cave or chest full of treasure, then snapping shut when they get inside. Kind of like a venus fly trap. Any thoughts about effectively implementing such an idea?



Haha! You fell into one of my traps! Take 3 damage!

So that's the answer to your first question...as for the second one...

What you are describing sounds kind of like the way a snapping turtle acts, yes? Wriggling its tongue with its mouth open to attract fish that think its tongue is a worm? Then closing on them when the fish goes for the bait? If so...cool monster. Sounds like a really big, old Mimic.

My general rule with traps is to treat them like a poker player in a movie...give them "tells". This is what shifts the dynamic from "gotcha!" to "wink wink nudge nudge" style.

Now, how the trap functions (trapping and digesting with acid, clamping down and mangling with teeth, swallowing, etc) is completely secondary to how you have to present it. For that you'll want to make sure you have a good idea of the traps tells. That is to say, make it suspicious. When something is suspicious, people will treat it suspiciously. In fact, that is one of my favorite rules to tell new players..."If something seems suspicious, treat it with suspicion"

Some examples might be making the chest WAY too inviting. "From the doorway you immediately see a huge, gold-trimmed chest resting in the middle of the room in plain view. The chest is open and is overflowing with coins, jewels and jewelry as if it were straight out of a misers fantasy."

Now, you don't want to necessarily have something you read verbatim, but that is okay depending on how comfortable you are with wording stuff. The important things to notice are the suspicious tells in the description. Telling a player they see it "from the doorway" and that it is "in plain view" will immediately ping in their brain as being weird. A treasure chest sitting where ANYONE can see it that just happens to walk by? The tells in the second sentence are similarly woven...it is "open" and "straight out of a miser's fantasy".

The important thing to keep in mind is that you aren't doing anything other than describing what the player sees. This is no different from what you do constantly...you are just picking your words to arouse suspicion without giving it all away. This is the core of good design for a trap like this. A player will almost immediately know that something is going on...that gives them pause...from there they can start working on figuring out WTF is up with this super inviting treasure chest.

It also makes it so that if someone just runs in and it springs the trap on them...well, honestly, it DID seem really suspicious didn't it? The design for the trap-monster you're proposing can't end there though. Now, keep in mind, the trap can be suspicious in other ways but it should be clear in your description. Off the top of my head here's some more...

"When you open the door you're hit with a wall of warm, slightly moist air. Beyond the threshold of the door is a particularly non-descript stone room with an exquisite treasure chest sitting directly in the middle of it."

See the tell in this one? Why was the air warm and moist? And why would something be described as "particularly" non-descript. These are curious things but they are both observable by a human being so they are fair game for how you describe it.

You have to consider how it will react to poking & proding as a trap (figuratively and maybe even literally!). This means being ready to answer questions as your players ask them. When they ask about the chest, make sure you know what "tells" the chest itself has. Perhaps it "rises out of the floor, the bottom of the chest flowing into the stone beneath it as if carved from one solid piece". Similarly, if the players ask about the room be prepared to give them a tell such as "the stones of the floor and walls are dirt free, as if freshly scrubbed of any detritus"

I hope that helps you. If you need more specifics or anything else, lemme know. I don't want to throw a huge wall of text at you because, frankly, you might not need a lot of it.

I'm on a journey of enlightenment, learning and self-improvement. A journey towards mastery. A journey that will never end. If you challenge me, prepare to be challenged. If you have something to offer as a fellow student, I will accept it. If you call yourself a master, prepare to be humbled. If you seek me, look to the path. I will be traveling it.

 

Proudly playing in many wrong ways. I'm not afraid of playing wrong according to the rules. Why are you?

 

100 Crack Reply of the Yagamifire. You are already wrong.

I did a trap encounter a while back which went something like this:

The PCs enter a long corridor.  Some skeletons near the beginning of it give the hint that there are traps.  The rogue finds and disarms/avoids the first trap.  The rogue finds a second trap after passing the first one, and is in the process of determining what to do, when a monster who has been chasing the PCs for quite some time (and is way over their level), rounds the corner behind them.  Effectively, they now have a time limit to traverse the trapped corridor and escape the rampaging monster.

The encounter seemed brilliant in my head, but it played out very stale.  I think it was mostly due to which traps I used: some more creative traps may have made the encounter more dynamic.  Any suggestions on how to more effectively implement this?



It's funny you should mention a situation like this because a situation like this came up in my game tonight. I apologize if this goes on a bit...I swear it has to do with your post.

My players had just ambushed and slew a very evil Orc witch that they managed to surprise in his home while his guard was down. Long story short, a series of events related to this lead to them being chased by a very angry Witchfire (a nasty undead Hag that is considerably powerful in relation to the group). The party had with them a series of 4 pikes that had on them talismans that could hedge out the Witchfire, making it incapable of traversing or attacking. Basically if you place the pikes in a way that would form a closed geometric shape (a triangle or square) the Witchfire couldn't trespass on them. The Orc witch had been using these to protect his home (atop a giant turtle) from the Witchfire by placing them at the 4 points around it.

So...the party got chased down by the Witchfire (that can fly faster than they can run) and it was clear combat was going to occur. The PCs REALLY didn't want to fight the Witchfire and they knew they could use the pikes to protect themselves by placing them around the party. It did get pointed out however that if they did this, they'd be trapped inside the circle stuck in a staring contest against an Undead that has no need to eat or sleep...while they DEFINITELY do. Basically it'd be a delay tactic at best. Perhaps still a viable solution...but not necessarily totally desirable. So the PCs flipped the switch...they decided to trap the Witchfire INSIDE the pikes instead of vice versa.

Well, through some quick maneuvering in combat they managed to do just that.

The actual "combat" played out in three rounds. The Witchfire was the only one that ever rolled to attack. The amount of time between the first and second round was about 15-20 minutes of real time. Why so long? Because that is how long it took the players to formulate their plan. That is pretty much the crux of my advice.

Time is fluid at the table...the time between a round can be stretched out however long is necessary. What this means is, when you are designing a trap or a "trap situation" like in your example, if it is clear that time is of the essence, there is nothing wrong at all with letting the players debate, scheme, plan and coordinate as much as they need to around the table. If they can resolve the whole thing with a series of precise actions within a round or two, that is okay..because it might take them 10 or more minutes to create that resolution out-of-character. This is typically much more fun than just seeing if someone can make X checks in Y rounds while the other players hope they can act as big enough HP sponges to buy time.

I will elaborate more if you like. It's just getting late for me and I don't know how digestible this first part is. Lemme know if this helps or what more you need.

I'm on a journey of enlightenment, learning and self-improvement. A journey towards mastery. A journey that will never end. If you challenge me, prepare to be challenged. If you have something to offer as a fellow student, I will accept it. If you call yourself a master, prepare to be humbled. If you seek me, look to the path. I will be traveling it.

 

Proudly playing in many wrong ways. I'm not afraid of playing wrong according to the rules. Why are you?

 

100 Crack Reply of the Yagamifire. You are already wrong.

Generally I enjoy contributing, but I haven't had a lot to say. Yagami's posts are especially enlightening in this thread.
Generally I enjoy contributing, but I haven't had a lot to say. Yagami's posts are especially enlightening in this thread.



Thank you. Feel free to contribute or even send any questions my way if anything piques your interest. I hope JTheta and acote follow up as well.

I'm on a journey of enlightenment, learning and self-improvement. A journey towards mastery. A journey that will never end. If you challenge me, prepare to be challenged. If you have something to offer as a fellow student, I will accept it. If you call yourself a master, prepare to be humbled. If you seek me, look to the path. I will be traveling it.

 

Proudly playing in many wrong ways. I'm not afraid of playing wrong according to the rules. Why are you?

 

100 Crack Reply of the Yagamifire. You are already wrong.

I have a lightning trap and it shoots all evil persons that pass by the door. The thief in the party is evil because he did some bad things but when I told him the trap shoots him with lightning he says he was good. I rolled really high to hit him too. He argued a lot that he was not evil when I know he was not good. There is treasure behind the door and that's why I think he wants to pretend he is good.
I have a lightning trap and it shoots all evil persons that pass by the door. The thief in the party is evil because he did some bad things but when I told him the trap shoots him with lightning he says he was good. I rolled really high to hit him too. He argued a lot that he was not evil when I know he was not good. There is treasure behind the door and that's why I think he wants to pretend he is good.



Sounds like you have a problem player. You may want to try talking to him and explain to him how the rules for your game and setting work. If that doesn't work, then you'll have to do the hard thing and let him go. Sometimes, when people are just being problems, the best thing to do is to just tell them to leave. Believe it or not, some people are such ****s that wherever people gather for the purpose of fun and learning new things, other people show up just to try and screw them up, because that is how they get their kicks. People like that should not be allowed to be around the communities they wish to infect. And personally, I'm not so much a fan of flashy lightning in my traps as I am vitriolic acid.
Yes! Acid is much better! I use acid now. I made that trap when I was 12. The trap with the lihtgning.
Yes! Acid is much better! I use acid now. I made that trap when I was 12. The trap with the lihtgning.



Check my post edit, I offer some good advice about problem players and problem people in general. Maybe its some advice you can use to make things better for you and your group.
I have a lightning trap and it shoots all evil persons that pass by the door. The thief in the party is evil because he did some bad things but when I told him the trap shoots him with lightning he says he was good. I rolled really high to hit him too. He argued a lot that he was not evil when I know he was not good. There is treasure behind the door and that's why I think he wants to pretend he is good.



An important thing to keep in mind is that a player might not be aware they were doing evil things...or they might be aware but they might not have been aware of the ramification on their alignment.

When a player whose alignment is not Evil is going to do an evil action, I make it a point to let them know "So you know, that's evil". Now, it's not that I care whether or not they do it because a player is free to do what they want with their character but it is important they are able to make fully informed decisions about their choices.

If you could elaborate on the "evil" things he did that would be helpful. Also, at the time of him committing those evil acts was it clear at the table those acts were evil? If not, that might be part of the disconnect.

I'm on a journey of enlightenment, learning and self-improvement. A journey towards mastery. A journey that will never end. If you challenge me, prepare to be challenged. If you have something to offer as a fellow student, I will accept it. If you call yourself a master, prepare to be humbled. If you seek me, look to the path. I will be traveling it.

 

Proudly playing in many wrong ways. I'm not afraid of playing wrong according to the rules. Why are you?

 

100 Crack Reply of the Yagamifire. You are already wrong.

He knows he was evil. He stole from the other players and killed some people. The character I mean LOL,,, Anyways he was a problem player back then before he turned 13 when we played with stuff like these kind of traps and alignment. 
He knows he was evil. He stole from the other players and killed some people. The character I mean LOL,,, Anyways he was a problem player back then before he turned 13 when we played with stuff like these kind of traps and alignment. 



I'll have to refer back to the fact that if the player was informed he was making evil decisions that it is reasonable that this would result in him being an evil person. However, this is really important to get across to a player though, otherwise it isn't fair to them because they would have been making uninformed decisions.

In other words, it is possible it was a failing of communication. If you were young, these things happen. The important thing, like everything else, is to learn from it. More important, however, is not to think the "stuff" is what is bad or wrong. Any system or tool can be implemented poorly. It is a poor craftsman that blames his tools and, unfortunately, MANY DMs are very fast to blame their tools rather than criticizing themselves. Don't fall into that trap (Ah the irony)

I'm on a journey of enlightenment, learning and self-improvement. A journey towards mastery. A journey that will never end. If you challenge me, prepare to be challenged. If you have something to offer as a fellow student, I will accept it. If you call yourself a master, prepare to be humbled. If you seek me, look to the path. I will be traveling it.

 

Proudly playing in many wrong ways. I'm not afraid of playing wrong according to the rules. Why are you?

 

100 Crack Reply of the Yagamifire. You are already wrong.

I did a trap encounter a while back which went something like this:

The PCs enter a long corridor.  Some skeletons near the beginning of it give the hint that there are traps.  The rogue finds and disarms/avoids the first trap.  The rogue finds a second trap after passing the first one, and is in the process of determining what to do, when a monster who has been chasing the PCs for quite some time (and is way over their level), rounds the corner behind them.  Effectively, they now have a time limit to traverse the trapped corridor and escape the rampaging monster.

The encounter seemed brilliant in my head, but it played out very stale.  I think it was mostly due to which traps I used: some more creative traps may have made the encounter more dynamic.  Any suggestions on how to more effectively implement this?



As mentioned this sounds like a mimc.  I love mimic encounters (though they can only be used very sparsely).  "Tells" I use with this kind of creature reinforce it's biological nature.  It appears to be made of wood and iron but only looks that way, with actual skin, maybe stray hairs or tiny scales visible upon close inspection.  Perhaps sores or scars, small tendrils poking out from the base of the chest or even minute signs of respiration.  Anything that fits the situation and whic could be tested  with a solid Perception check. 

If you wanted to trap or torment the party repeatedly, something like an ettercap may fit the bill.  They use webs and predatory intelligance to hunt even humanoids and sentient creatures.  They often utilize spiders or scorpions in a 'war dog' capacity, and they can easily fit into subterranean, mountainous, and forested or swampy terrains.
I like the idea of it being an advanced Mimic creature. Not sure if there'll be a good place to put such a thing in my upcoming campaign, but I'll watch out for a spot where it could fit.
Time is fluid at the table...the time between a round can be stretched out however long is necessary. What this means is, when you are designing a trap or a "trap situation" like in your example, if it is clear that time is of the essence, there is nothing wrong at all with letting the players debate, scheme, plan and coordinate as much as they need to around the table. If they can resolve the whole thing with a series of precise actions within a round or two, that is okay..because it might take them 10 or more minutes to create that resolution out-of-character. This is typically much more fun than just seeing if someone can make X checks in Y rounds while the other players hope they can act as big enough HP sponges to buy time.



Yeah, when I said time limit, I merely meant in the number of actions allowed of the party.  I have no problem letting them discuss their plans extensively, unless the other players are getting bored by said discussion.  The encounter came off as stale tho: rogue makes perception check, rogue makes thievery check (or the PCs figure out how to skirt around the trap), everyone moves forward, rinse repeat.  I'm hoping to figure out how to make this encounter as dynamic and exciting as it was in my head

..."window.parent.tinyMCE.get('post_content').onLoad.dispatch();" contenteditable="true" />Yeah, when I said time limit, I merely meant in the number of actions allowed of the party.  I have no problem letting them discuss their plans extensively, unless the other players are getting bored by said discussion.  The encounter came off as stale tho: rogue makes perception check, rogue makes thievery check (or the PCs figure out how to skirt around the trap), everyone moves forward, rinse repeat.  I'm hoping to figure out how to make this encounter as dynamic and exciting as it was in my head




Sorry for the delay in replying. Had limited internet access between work and power issues after the storm.

I can see better now what you were going for. The issue you will have using something like that is that there is no real mounting tension. Ideally what you want is a count down timer where the rogue cuts the right wire with 1 seconds left, but thanks to the randomness of dice and actions, there's no way to adequately set that up. Instead, the way to approach it is to use a situation that is on-going and fluid. Having pass/fail be entirely binary will not serve this purpose. Similarly, something like a skill challenge in 4E does not really accomplish this because the successes/fails system does not necessarily equate to tangible tension. Unless you make it, that is.

So, you have to give the trap/trick stepped successes/failures. Things that are directly tangible for as many people as possible. For instance, if you had a water trap you could determine what the trap needs to be by-passed if its tripped...this can either be something the players can actually figure out or some mechanical challenge that an appropriate skill like Disable Device can interact with. It's important with the latter that a logical explanation be provided for the mechanism so if the players DO want to figure out a way to help overcome it they can do so or be given an appropriate bonus to the roll.

An example I can give is something like a water trap where a room or hall is filling with water while the party has to fight some nasty monster. Perhaps the monster is aquatic and the rising water gives it advantanges while also giving disadvantages to the players (since water is hard to slosh around in and fight). So the rogue is trying to reverse the flow of water with a mechanical release (or what have you). He needs so many successes to make it happen. Every success slows water...every failure over a certain threshold (5 or 10 or so) makes water flow in faster (a botch). At certain points you have determined the water will reach increasing thresholds. Maybe after 4 rounds the water gives the players -1 to attack and -1 to AC as they have to slog in it which also cuts their move (and the monster gets +1/+1) then at 8 rounds its -2/-2 (and the monster is at +2/+2 and maybe regenerating now thanks to the water) and they have to make swim checks just to move. At 12 rounds the room is almost full and people have to start trying to keep their heads above water. That sorta stuff.

As the rogue works on the trap you can bet the players will be rooting for him to hurry up. If he fails by the appropriate amount, you push forward by 1 round the count you have going. so perhaps at round 3 he botches and it causes the -2/-2 penalty a full round earlier. The next time a botch occurs it pushes the counter forward by 2 rounds. When the rogue succeeds, he adds another round to the counter...when he succeeds enough times he stops the water all-together. Maybe he can even continue his work and get the water to filter out of the room to start eliminating the minuses to his team and the bonuses to their opponent.

In a nutshell, tach success or failure has to be tangible to the rogue and, hopefully, as many other players as possible. This will make it visceral for them and makes the rolls feel like they matter more.

I'm on a journey of enlightenment, learning and self-improvement. A journey towards mastery. A journey that will never end. If you challenge me, prepare to be challenged. If you have something to offer as a fellow student, I will accept it. If you call yourself a master, prepare to be humbled. If you seek me, look to the path. I will be traveling it.

 

Proudly playing in many wrong ways. I'm not afraid of playing wrong according to the rules. Why are you?

 

100 Crack Reply of the Yagamifire. You are already wrong.

Is it better to tell the players there is a trap and let them solve it or to make the trap attack them if they don't look for it? I like the first thing but them why does the characters have Perception checks?
Dear Sage,

I am going to be running my group through Dragon Mountain soon. Kobold traps are frequent and nasty. Interestingly, they may or may not have a rogue upon first entering - 2 more players will be returning to our group aftethawing their first baby, but their return date is obviously up in the air. I am looking at ways to keep traps (a) fresh throughout a big dungeon crawl, and (b) use traps to advance the story or create interesting complications...at least at first (saving the killer traps for once they've got a PC trained in Thievery).*

What advice can you offer a humble DM? 

Thanks!

* See this great article by Steve Winter (www.koboldquarterly.com/k/front-page1319...) for explanation of "Story" traps.
Dear Sage,

I am going to be running my group through Dragon Mountain soon. Kobold traps are frequent and nasty. Interestingly, they may or may not have a rogue upon first entering - 2 more players will be returning to our group aftethawing their first baby, but their return date is obviously up in the air. I am looking at ways to keep traps (a) fresh throughout a big dungeon crawl, and (b) use traps to advance the story or create interesting complications...at least at first (saving the killer traps for once they've got a PC trained in Thievery).*

What advice can you offer a humble DM? 

Thanks!

* See this great article by Steve Winter (www.koboldquarterly.com/k/front-page1319...) for explanation of "Story" traps.



That is a great article indeed. An important thing, however, is that I don't really believe any trap should be unavoidable. Not TOTALLY unavoidable that is. There should be some way to mitigate it even if it isn't likely. With that out of the way, however, I'll gladly answer your question...

The important thing with traps is to make sure they are presented with the initial information you give the players upon entering a trapped area. You do not reveal the trap, but you reveal that something is amiss.

For instance, when the PCs enter an area with a trap that is, for instance, a pressure plate trap linked to arrows (a classic), make sure to describe the floor to the players. Now, other non-trap floors should also be described to the players but here you will make sure to have a hook. Something for them to latch onto. "You enter a long hallway with an uneven roof, walls of cut stone with some poorly fitting bricks, and a floor of ornate tile work".

You have now mentioned a roof feature, two wall features and an evocative but non-defined floor feature. Wary players (and smart players should be wary) will ask questions. You want them to ask questions. You are the lens through which they see the world so they should expect to focus you in on details.

This is where you start to show your hand through the questions.

"Uneven roof?" "It's natural stone" "Ah okay." - Nothing more given. No more details to uncover unless the player wants to know the kind of stone. Keep in mind, as a DM ff the kind of stone was overly relevant, you should have mentioned a quality of the stone.

"Do the poorly fitted stones seem broken or something?" (maybe you ask for a roll) "Some stones are simply smaller than others, leading to some noticeable gaps between where the stones meet at intervals along the wall" This description begs more questions. Noticeable? At intervals? You are giving the players information and leaving room for curiosities to arise. Holes in the wall set at intervals? Well that seems curious doesn't it?

"What's the tile work look like?" "The designs are runic...[if someone knows the language]...you know they're kobold runes, So-and-So. [if you do not have it on hand, make sure not to ask 'Do you know language X?', instead ask what languages the person speaks. That way they will list them all] The design is set into a pattern on the floor" Again, you are giving information. Having ready information implies there is more to be uncovered. Kobold runes worked into the floor? Well that IS interesting, isn't it? Hmm.

Once you have sufficiently aroused curiosity in the players, they will start poking & proding, asking questions and using skills. (if you want advice on dealing with that, I can do assist with that too).

Keep in mind a trap can be potentially more interesting when it ISN'T sprung because it lets your players interact with something instead of just reacting to something.

I can go into longer-running "story" traps of the sort described as well, if you like, but I don't want to just throw too much at you without knowing if its helpful.

As a resource you might want to check out hackslashmaster.blogspot.com/search/labe... this blog. It's extremely good and this is a link to his trap series. He does a great job of showing how to "frame" traps to keep them fair, interesting and engaging.

I'm on a journey of enlightenment, learning and self-improvement. A journey towards mastery. A journey that will never end. If you challenge me, prepare to be challenged. If you have something to offer as a fellow student, I will accept it. If you call yourself a master, prepare to be humbled. If you seek me, look to the path. I will be traveling it.

 

Proudly playing in many wrong ways. I'm not afraid of playing wrong according to the rules. Why are you?

 

100 Crack Reply of the Yagamifire. You are already wrong.