Forging The Realms: The Player Pack

Forging The Realms 
The Player Pack

By Ed Greenwood

In the early 1990s, I ran several short "mini" Realms campaigns at the public library I worked at. Neither I nor the players wanted to waste a lot of time getting started, so I provided pregenerated player characters with backstories, and a starting direction for play in the form of a charter for the PC adventuring band. As the Company of the Dragon (or the Wyvern, Basilisk, Cockatrice, Falcon, or whatever) they began working together somewhere in Cormyr, with a small, simple mission they had to fulfill in return for that charter.

Talk about this column here.

Ends Are Sometimes Better Left Loose

Yan
Montréal, Canada
@Plaguescarred on twitter

Fun advice for minimizing session 0 and start playing. Something thats important when you have a group of players new to the game. Pregenerated characters can work as well if you dont want to bog them down with too much info at once.

Personally I enjoy session 0 very much to lose it. Sure I have some ideas and usually I make backgrounds for new players as well. But I want to see if my player gets excited when I tell them so I can get hints of how much I should use in further adventures. As for their characters yes I offer several suggestions but I like the new player to give me pointers or have some desicions/opinions made for his/her character. A personal touch if you will.

The other dreary part was art. I pretty much suck at drawing. I sketched a weird looking owlbear once as a magical experiment creature that run amok and destroyed their village. I didnt want to tell the type of the creature ofc since they had it only in their foggy childhood memories and I just handed them my sketch. They decided it must have been a panda or something and then made some other non complimentary comments about my drawing skills (yeah that bad). At least Im better with towns/vlillages and dungeons.

Thats why dnd art is important to me because I use it very often. From cities to villages, to monsters to cool and non cool characters/npcs.

Sorry for getting off topic, overall I liked it.
I like Ed's idea of a Player Pack containing personal PC notes, maps, goals, contacts etc..as a way to develop a D&D campaign and drop it directly in the player's hands, perhaps  as a collaborative work with their help.

Yan
Montréal, Canada
@Plaguescarred on twitter

I like Ed's idea of a Player Pack containing personal PC notes, maps, goals, contacts etc..as a way to develop a D&D campaign and drop it directly in the player's hands, perhaps  as a collaborative work with their help.

That's the part I took away most from it. I'm unsure how to incorporate that with D&D Next's "roll and play" character design. Perhaps just let players roll the dice privately at home, let them shoot me their build and then provide them with notes leading up to the first game?